Nicaraguan general election, 1957

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General elections were held in Nicaragua to elect a president and parliament on 3 February 1957.

Luis Somoza Debayle formalized his grip on the presidency through fraudulent elections in February 1957 which were boycotted by all the opposition except the puppet Conservative Nationalist Party (PNC). The Popular Social Christian Party (PPSC) was created in reaction to these elections and received support from younger Conservatives dissatisfied with their party’s inability to make any political impact on the dictatorship”.[1]

Presidential election results[2][edit]

Candidate Party/Alliance Votes %
Luis Anastasio Somoza Debayle Liberal Nationalist Party (PLN) 316,998 89.25%
Edmundo Amador Pineda Conservative Nationalist Party (PCN) 38,180 10.75%
Total valid votes 355,178 100%
Spoilt and invalid votes ?? ??
Total votes/Turnout ?? ??
Registered voters ??
Population 1,290,000

Legislative election [3][edit]

Parties and alliances Votes % Seats/ Senate Seats/ Chamber of Deputies
Liberal Nationalist Party (PLN) 316,998 89.25% 12 28
Conservative Nationalist Party (PCN) 38,180 10.75% 04+3* 14
Total valid votes 355,178 100% 16+3* 42
Spoilt and invalid votes ?? ??
Total votes/Turnout ?? ??
Registered voters ??
Population 1,290,000

(*) Plus the defeated Presidential candidate in 1957 (Conservative) and two life-time Senators (Conservatives) by virtue of their being ex-Presidents of the Republic.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bulmer-Thomas, Victor. “ Nicaragua since 1930.” Central America since independence. 1991. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Pp. 254.
  2. ^ Elections in the Americas : a data handbook / ed. by Dieter Nohlen, Vol. 1. [Oxford] [u.a.] : Oxford Univ. Press, 2005. Pp.501.
  3. ^ Elections in the Americas : a data handbook / ed. by Dieter Nohlen, Vol. 1. [Oxford] [u.a.] : Oxford Univ. Press, 2005. Pp.496.

Bibliography[edit]

  • Bulmer-Thomas, Victor. “ Nicaragua since 1930.” Central America since independence. 1991. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Elections in the Americas A Data Handbook Volume 1. North America, Central America, and the Caribbean. Edited by Dieter Nohlen. 2005.
  • Gambone, Michael D. Capturing the revolution: the United States, Central America, and Nicaragua, 1961-1972. Westport: Praeger. 2001.
  • González, Victoria . “Somocista women, right-wing politics, and feminism in Nicaragua, 1936-1979.” Radical women in Latin America: left and right. 2001. University Park: The Pennsylvania State University. Revised edition of González 1997.
  • Martz, John D. Central America, the crisis and the challenge. Chapel Hill: the University of North Carolina Press. 1959.
  • Metoyer, Cynthia Chavez. Women and the state in post-Sandinista Nicaragua. Boulder: Lynne Rienner Publishers, Inc. 2000.
  • Millett, Richard. Guardians of the dynasty: a history of the U.S. created Guardia Nacional de Nicaragua and the Somoza Family. Maryknoll: Orbis Books. 1977.
  • Parker, Franklin D. The Central American republics. Westport: Greenwood Press. Reprint of 1964 original. 1981.
  • Political handbook of the world 1958. New York, 1959.
  • Tenorio, Gloria Esther and Mercedes Ríos Rocha. La participación política de las mujeres en el proceso electoral 1996. Managua: Instituto de Investigaciones Mujer y Cambio.