Niccolò Gaddi

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Niccolò Gaddi
Coat of arms of Cardinal Niccolò Gaddi

Niccolò Gaddi (1499–1552) was an Italian Roman Catholic cardinal.

Biography[edit]

Niccolò Gaddi was born in Florence in 1499, the son of Taddeo Gaddi and Antonia Altoviti.[1] He was a direct descendant of medieval painter Taddeo Gaddi.[1] He was the uncle of Cardinal Taddeo Gaddi and a relative of Catherine de' Medici.[1]

He began his career in Rome as a cleric in the Apostolic Camera. He then became an abbreviator of Apostolic Letters.[1]

On October 16, 1521, he was elected Bishop of Fermo.[1] He was never consecrated as a bishop and he resigned the administration of the see sometime before December 5, 1544.[1]

Pope Clement VII made him a cardinal deacon in the consistory of May 3, 1527.[1] He received the red hat and the deaconry of San Teodoro on the same day.[1]

During the Sack of Rome (1527), he was assigned as a hostage for Pope Clement VII.[1] Imperial troops held him prisoner in the fortress in Naples for a long time.[1]

He was the administrator of the metropolitan see of Cosenza from January 31, 1528 until June 21, 1535.[1] In 1533, he was named cardinal protector of the Kingdom of France.[1] He was administrator of the see of Sarlat from December 12, 1533 until July 3, 1545.[1]

He participated in the papal conclave of 1534 that elected Pope Paul III.[1] On January 9, 1545, he opted for the deaconry of Santi Vito, Modesto e Crescenzia.[1] He participated in the papal conclave of 1549-50 that elected Pope Julius III.[1] On February 28, 1550, he opted for the deaconry of Santa Maria in Domnica and on June 27, 1550 for the deaconry of Santa Maria in Via Lata.[1] At this time, he became cardinal protodeacon.[1] On November 20, 1551, he opted for the order of cardinal priests and his deaconry was raised pro illa vice to titulus.[1]

He died in Florence on January 16, 1552.[1] He is buried in the Basilica of Santa Maria Novella.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u Biography from the Biographical Dictionary of the Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church