Nicholas Cook

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Nicholas Cook (born 5 June 1950[1]) is a British musicologist and writer born in Athens, Greece. In 2009 he became the 1684 Professor of Music at the University of Cambridge, where he is a Fellow of Darwin College. Previously, he was professorial research fellow at Royal Holloway, University of London, where he directed the Arts and Humanities Research Council Research Centre for the History and Analysis of Recorded Music (CHARM). He has also taught at the University of Hong Kong, University of Sydney, and University of Southampton, where he served as dean of arts.

He is a former editor of the Journal of the Royal Musical Association and was elected a Fellow of the British Academy in 2001.

Books[edit]

  • (Co-edited with Eric Clarke, Daniel Leech-Wilkinson, and John Rink) The Cambridge Companion to Recorded Music. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009.
  • The Schenker Project: Culture, Race, and Music Theory in Fin-de-siècle Vienna. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007.
  • Music, Performance, Meaning: Selected Essays. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2007.
  • (Co-edited with Anthony Pople) The Cambridge History of Twentieth-Century Music. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004.
  • (Co-edited with Eric Clarke) Empirical Musicology: Aims, Methods, Prospects. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004.
  • (Co-edited with Mark Everist) Rethinking Music. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1999.
  • Music: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1998.
  • Analysing Musical Multimedia. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1998.
  • Beethoven: Symphony No. 9. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998.
  • Music, Imagination, and Culture. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1990.
  • Musical Analysis and the Listener. New York: Garland, 1989.
  • A Guide to Musical Analysis. London: Dent, 1987.

References[edit]

  1. ^ COOK, Prof. Nicholas (John)’, Who's Who 2012, A & C Black, 2012; online edn, Oxford University Press, Dec 2011 ; online edn, Nov 2011 accessed 9 April 2012

External links[edit]