Nicholas Kulish

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Nicholas M. Kulish
Born July, 1975
Washington, D.C.
Occupation journalist, author
Notable credit(s) The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal

Nicholas Kulish (born July 1975) is an author and journalist who reports for The New York Times. Since June 2013 he has served as the paper's East Africa correspondent. He is the author of two books, the satirical novel Last One In and the nonfiction book The Eternal Nazi.

Life and Work[edit]

Born in Washington, D.C., Kulish was educated at Columbia University, graduating in 1997. He worked a series of writing and Internet jobs in Hong Kong and New York City before becoming first a news assistant, then a reporter, at The Wall Street Journal. As a correspondent in the paper's Washington bureau he covered the Florida election recount in 2000 and the September 11 attacks at the Pentagon.[1] In 2003, he was sent to report on the invasion of Iraq for The Wall Street Journal. This influenced the writing of his first novel Last One In (2007).

Kulish joined the Times as a member of the editorial board in September 2005. There he wrote editorials about business, culture, Hurricane Katrina and the rebuilding of New Orleans.[2][3]

From August 2007 to May 2013 he was the newspaper's Berlin bureau chief, covering Central and Eastern Europe. While Kulish was based in Berlin he and his colleague Souad Mekhennet uncovered the hiding place of most-wanted Nazi fugitive Aribert Heim in Cairo.[4] He and Mekhennet, his co-author for The Eternal Nazi (2014), were later detained by the Egyptian secret police while covering the uprising there in 2011.[5]

In East Africa he covers South Sudan,[6] the Democratic Republic of Congo[7] and beyond.

Personal[edit]

Kulish grew up in Alexandria, Virginia and Arlington, Virginia.

He is fluent in German and was a Fulbright Scholar in Berlin.

Bibliography[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Nicholas Kulish's web site: Biography
  2. ^ Meanwhile: Picking and choosing history in Berlin. Nytimes.com. February 27, 2006. Retrieved on 2011-10-08.
  3. ^ Nicholas Kulish ’97 Covers the Iraq Invasion His Way. college.columbia.edu. November–December 2007
  4. ^ Uncovering Lost Path of the Most Wanted Nazi. Nytimes.com. February 4, 2009. Retrieved on 2014-03-19.
  5. ^ Two Detained Reporters Saw Police’s Methods. Nytimes.com. February 4, 2011. Retrieved on 2014-03-19.
  6. ^ Old Rivalries Reignited a Fuse in South Sudan. Nytimes.com. December 31, 2013. Retrieved on 2014-03-19.
  7. ^ A Reason for Hope in Congo’s Perpetual War. Nytimes.com. October 26, 2013. Retrieved on 2014-03-19.

External links[edit]