Nick Taylor (golfer)

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Nick Taylor
— Golfer —
Personal information
Full name Nick Taylor
Born (1988-04-17) April 17, 1988 (age 26)
Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
Height 5 ft 10 in (1.78 m)
Nationality  Canada
Career
College University of Washington
Turned professional 2010
Current tour(s) Web.com Tour
Best results in Major Championships
Masters Tournament DNP
U.S. Open T36: 2009
The Open Championship DNP
PGA Championship DNP
Achievements and awards
Mark H. McCormack Medal 2009
Ben Hogan Award 2010

Nick Taylor (born April 17, 1988) is a Canadian professional golfer. He graduated from the University of Washington, and he won the 2007 Canadian Amateur Championship.

Taylor was born in Winnipeg, Manitoba and grew up in Abbotsford, British Columbia. His home golf course is Ledgeview Golf and Country Club.

In 2008, Taylor qualified for the U.S. Open, in which he missed the cut by three strokes.[1][2] He also finished T53 at the 2008 RBC Canadian Open. He qualified for the 2009 U.S. Open at Bethpage Black, where he did make the cut, carding a 65 in the second round, the record for lowest by an amateur in major's history.[3] He finished tied for 36th, being the lowest amateur of the championship. He also became the number one world amateur golfer according to the R&A World Amateur Golf Ranking. In September 2009, he won the Mark H. McCormack Medal for being on top of the World Amateur Golf Ranking after the U.S. Amateur.

Taylor turned professional in late 2010.[4] He will play on the Web.com Tour in 2014 after earning his tour card through qualifying school.

Amateur wins (3)[edit]

Other accomplishments[edit]

Results in major championships[edit]

Tournament 2008 2009
Masters Tournament DNP DNP
U.S. Open CUT T36 LA
The Open Championship DNP DNP
PGA Championship DNP DNP

LA = Low Amateur
DNP = Did not play
CUT = missed the half-way cut
"T" = tied
Yellow background for top-10.

Team appearances[edit]

Amateur

  • Eisenhower Trophy (representing Canada): 2008
  • Four Nations Cup (representing Canada): 2009 (winners)[6]

References[edit]

External links[edit]