Nickel Belt

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For the provincial electoral district, see Nickel Belt (provincial electoral district).
Nickel Belt
Flag of Ontario.svg Ontario electoral district
Nickel Belt.png
Nickel Belt in relation to other Ontario electoral districts
Federal electoral district
Legislature House of Commons
MP
 
 
 
Claude Gravelle
New Democratic
District created 1952
First contested 1953
Last contested 2011
District webpage profile, map
Demographics
Population (2011)[1] 92,391
Electors (2011) 71,107
Area (km²)[2] 30,200.65
Pop. density (per km²) 3.1
Census divisions Greater Sudbury, Sudbury District plus small portions of Timiskaming, Manitoulin, Nipissing and Parry Sound
Census subdivisions Biscotasing, Cartier, French River, Gogama, Greater Sudbury, Killarney, Markstay-Warren, St. Charles, West Nipissing, Whitefish Lake

Nickel Belt is one of two federal electoral districts serving the City of Greater Sudbury.

Nickel Belt has been represented in the House of Commons of Canada since 1953.

It consists of:

  • the part of the Territorial District of Timiskaming lying west of the townships of Fallon and Cleaver;
  • the Territorial District of Sudbury, excluding:
    • the part lying west of and including the townships of Shenango, Lemoine, Carty, Pinogami, Biggs, Rollo, Swayze, Cunningham, Blamey, Shipley, Singapore, Burr and Edighoffer;
    • the part lying south and west of a line and including the townships of Acheson, Venturi and Ermatinger and Totten, west of and excluding the City of Greater Sudbury, and west of and including the Township of Roosevelt;
  • the northeast part of the City of Greater Sudbury;
  • the Town of Killarney (in the territorial district of Manitoulin and Parry Sound);
  • the unorganized territory lying on the north shore of Georgian Bay and east of the town of Killarney in the Territorial District of Manitoulin; and
  • the Municipality of West Nipissing (in the Territorial District of Nipissing).

Nickel Belt that has the highest percentage of people claiming French ethnic origin (45.1%, 2006 Census).[3]

History[edit]

The riding of Nickel Belt was created in 1952 from parts of Algoma East, Algoma—Manitoulin, Nipissing, Parry Sound—Muskoka, Sudbury and Timiskaming—Cochrane ridings. It has traditionally included much of the Sudbury District and small parts of the Algoma, Nipissing and Timiskaming Districts, along with all but the urban core of Greater Sudbury.

It consisted initially of parts of the territorial districts of Sudbury and Algoma, and excluding the city of Sudbury, town of Copper Cliff, and the township of McKim. In 1966, it was redefined to consist of parts of the territorial districts of Sudbury excluding the City of Sudbury and the Town of Copper Cliff, and the northeast part of the territorial district of Manitoulin.

In 1976, it was redefined to consist of the southern part of Regional Municipality of Sudbury, the southeast part of the Territorial District of Sudbury, and the part of the Territorial District of Manitoulin including and lying east of the Townships of Killarney, and Rutherford and George Island.

In 1987, it was redefined to consist of the southern part of the Regional Municipality of Sudbury; the geographic townships of Cartier, Cascaden, Foy, Hart, Harty, Hess and Moncrieff and that part of the geographic Township of Trill not within the Town of Walden in the Territorial District of Sudbury; Wahnapitei Indian Reserve No. 11; and Whitefish Lake Indian Reserve No. 6.

In 1996, it was redefined to consist of:

  • the part of the Territorial District of Timiskaming lying west of the eastern limit of the geographic townships of Douglas and Geikie;
  • the Territorial District of Sudbury excluding:
    • the part lying west of the eastern boundary of the townships of Shenango, Lemoine, Carty, Pinogami, Biggs, Rollo, Swayze, Cunningham, Blamey, Shipley, Singapore, Burr and Edighoffer;
    • the part lying south and west of and including the townships of Acheson, Venturi, Ermatinger, Totten and west of but excluding the Regional Municipality of Sudbury, and west of but including the Townships of Foster and Curtin.
    • the part lying east of a line and including the Townships of Stull, Valin, Cotton, Beresford and Creelman, east of and excluding the Regional Municipality of Sudbury and the Township of Hawley, east of and excluding the Townships of Hendrie and Hoskin, east of and excluding the Townships of Cosby, Mason and Martland;
  • the part of Regional Municipality of Sudbury south of a line drawn from east to west along Highway 69, south along Long Lake Road, and west along the north boundary of the Township of Broder.

In 2003, it was given its current boundaries as described above.

Members of Parliament[edit]

This riding has elected the following Members of Parliament:

Parliament Years Member Party
Nickel Belt
Riding created from Algoma East, Algoma—Manitoulin, Nipissing,
Parry Sound—Muskoka, Sudbury and Timiskaming—Cochrane
22nd  1953 − 1957     Léoda Gauthier Liberal
23rd  1957 − 1958
24th  1958 − 1962     Osias Godin Liberal
25th  1962 − 1963
26th  1963 − 1965
27th  1965 − 1968     Norman Fawcett New Democratic
28th  1968 − 1972     Gaetan Serré Liberal
29th  1972 − 1974     John Rodriguez New Democratic
30th  1974 − 1979
31st  1979 − 1980
32nd  1980 − 1984     Judy Erola Liberal
33rd  1984 − 1988     John Rodriguez New Democratic
34th  1988 − 1993
35th  1993 − 1997     Raymond Bonin Liberal
36th  1997 − 2000
37th  2000 − 2004
38th  2004 − 2006
39th  2006 − 2008
40th  2008 − 2011     Claude Gravelle New Democratic
41st  2011 − Present

Election results[edit]

Canadian federal election, 2011
Party Candidate Votes % ∆% Expenditures
New Democratic Claude Gravelle 24,566 54.97 +8.43
Conservative Lynne Reynolds 12,503 27.98 +6.28
Liberal Joe Cormier 6,382 14.28 -12.02
Green Christine Guillot 1,252 2.80 -2.23
Marxist–Leninist Steve Rutchinski 59 0.13 -0.03
Total valid votes/Expense limit 44,688 100.00
Total rejected ballots 171 0.38 -0.09
Turnout 44,859 62.60
Eligible voters 71,659
Canadian federal election, 2008
Party Candidate Votes % ∆% Expenditures
New Democratic Claude Gravelle 19,021 46.54 +7.94 $63,497
Liberal Louise Portelance 10,748 26.30 -16.90 $61,589
Conservative Ian McCracken 8,869 21.70 +9.00
Green Fred Twilley 2,056 5.03 +2.93 $2,065
Independent Yves Villeneuve 112 0.27
Marxist–Leninist Steve Rutchinski 66 0.16 +0.06
Total valid votes/Expense limit 40,872 100.00 $94,270
Total rejected ballots 193 0.47
Turnout 41,065
     New Democratic Party gain from Liberal Swing +12.42
Canadian federal election, 2006
Party Candidate Votes % ∆% Expenditures
Liberal Ray Bonin 19,775 43.20 +0.79 $64,036
New Democratic Claude Gravelle 17,668 38.60 +4.10 $75,188
Conservative Margaret Schwartzentruber 5,822 12.70 -6.12 $10,196
Progressive Canadian Mathieu Péron 1,044 2.30
Green Mark McAllister 975 2.10 -0.44
Marijuana Michel D. Ethier 421 0.90 -0.16
Marxist–Leninist Steve Rutchinski 42 0.10 -0.03 $68
Total valid votes/Expense limit 45,747 100.00 $87,252
Canadian federal election, 2004
Party Candidate Votes % ∆% Expenditures
Liberal Ray Bonin 17,188 42.41 -13.16 $44,339
New Democratic Claude Gravelle 13,980 34.50 +13.34 $32,073
Conservative Mike Dupont 7,628 18.82 -4.45 $59,250
Green Steve Lafleur 1,031 2.54
Marijuana Michel D. Ethier 430 1.06
Independent Don Lavallee 217 0.54 $2,875
Marxist–Leninist Steve Rutchinski 51 0.13 $435
Total valid votes/Expense limit 40,525 100.00 $84,953

Note: Conservative vote is compared to the total of the Canadian Alliance vote and Progressive Conservative vote in 2000 election.

Canadian federal election, 2000
Party Candidate Votes % ∆% Expenditures
Liberal Ray Bonin 19,187 55.57 +6.72 $42,569
New Democratic Sandy Bass 7,304 21.16 -12.32 $61,722
Alliance Neil Martin 6,369 18.45 6.49 $13,072
Progressive Conservative Reg Couldridge 1,665 4.82 0.40 $2,739
Total valid votes/Expense limit 34,525 100.00 $68,755

Note: Canadian Alliance vote is compared to the Reform vote in 1997 election.

Canadian federal election, 1997
Party Candidate Votes % ∆% Expenditures
Liberal Ray Bonin 19,489 48.85 -8.34 $43,205
New Democratic Elie Martel 13,355 33.48 +10.37 $62,794
Reform Neil Martin 4,771 11.96 -0.74 $13,794
Progressive Conservative Reg Couldridge 1,763 4.42 -1.01 $5,596
Canadian Action Don Scott 369 0.92 $1,181
Natural Law Mitchell Hibbs 145 0.36 -0.03
Total valid votes/Expense limit 39,892 100.00 $65,400


Canadian federal election, 1993
Party Candidate Votes % ∆% Expenditures
Liberal Ray Bonin 25,237 57.19 +33.62 $42,807
     New Democratic Party John Rodriguez 10,197 23.11 -21.62 $52,551
     Reform Janice Weitzel 5,604 12.70 $4,156
     Progressive Conservative Ian Munro 2,395 5.43 -15.32 $4,808
     National Brian Woods 346 0.78 $0
     Natural Law Daniel Jolicoeur 173 0.39 $533
     Non-Affiliated Ernie Ashick 122 0.27 $571
     Abolitionist Cindy A. Burton 53 0.12 $0
Total valid votes 44,127 100.00
Total rejected ballots 329
Turnout 44,456 70.71 -5.47
Electors on the lists 62,869
Source: Thirty-fifth General Election, 1993: Official Voting Results, Published by the Chief Electoral Officer of Canada. Financial figures taken from official contributions and expenses provided by Elections Canada.


Canadian federal election, 1988
Party Candidate Votes % ∆% Expenditures
     New Democratic Party John Rodriguez 17,418 44.73 +6.13 $39,240
Liberal Pierre Legros 9,178 23.57 -5.98 $36,271
     Progressive Conservative Richard Berthiaume 8,080 20.75 -10.45 $35,830
     Confederation of Regions Billie Christiansen 4,066 10.44 $9,695
Rhinoceros Keith J. Claven 202 0.52 -0.13 $330
Total valid votes 38,944 100.00
Total rejected ballots 147
Turnout 39,091 76.18
Electors on the lists 51,312
Note: Percentage change numbers are not factored for redistribution.


Canadian federal election, 1984
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
     New Democratic Party John Rodriguez 17,141 38.60 -3.46
     Progressive Conservative Gord Slade 13,857 31.20 +21.00
Liberal Judy Erola 13,124 29.55 -17.97
Rhinoceros Derek Aardvark Orford 288 0.65
Total valid votes 44,410 100.00
Total rejected ballots 250 0.01
Turnout 44,660 79.55 +4.37
Electors on the lists 56,139


Canadian federal election, 1980
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Liberal Judy Erola 19,805 47.52 +8.97
     New Democratic Party John Rodriguez 17,529 42.06 -1.31
     Progressive Conservative Dennis Tappenden 4,250 10.20 -7.63
Marxist–Leninist David Starbuck 89 0.21 -0.04
Total valid votes 41,673 100.00
Total rejected ballots 119
Turnout 41,792 75.18 -1.90
Electors on the lists 55,587


Canadian federal election, 1979
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
     New Democratic Party John Rodriguez 17,772 43.37 -6.41
Liberal Judy Erola 15,799 38.55 +0.65
     Progressive Conservative Harwood Nesbitt 7,308 17.83 +5.51
Marxist–Leninist David Starbuck 103 0.25
Total valid votes 40,982 100.00
Total rejected ballots 115
Turnout 41,097 77.08 -0.28
Electors on the lists 53,320
Note: Percentage change numbers are not factored for redistribution.


Canadian federal election, 1974
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
     New Democratic Party John Rodriguez 17,668 49.78 +3.75
Liberal Gil Mayer 13,451 37.90 -1.79
     Progressive Conservative Ralph Connor 4,371 12.32 -0.20
Total valid votes 35,490 100.00
Total rejected ballots 97
Turnout 35,587 77.36 -1.65
Electors on the lists 46,001


Canadian federal election, 1972
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
     New Democratic Party John Rodriguez 14,033 46.03 +8.46
Liberal Gaetan Serré 12,101 39.69 -5.41
     Progressive Conservative Bernie White 3,817 12.52 -4.81
     Social Credit Donat Breault 534 1.75
Total valid votes 30,485 100.00
Total rejected ballots 4,718
Turnout 35,203 79.01
Electors on the lists 44,556
Note: The number of rejected ballots is not a misprint. Gaetan Serré initially called for these ballots to be reviewed, but withdrew his request on November 14, 1972 after viewing a sample. Source: "Review cancelled", Globe and Mail, 14 November 1972, 8. Source for results: Official Voting Results, Office of the Chief Electoral Officer (Canada), 1972.
Canadian federal election, 1968
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Liberal Gaetan Serré 11,551 45.10 +5.64
New Democratic Norman Fawcett 9,621 37.57 -3.75
Progressive Conservative Cecil Fielding 4,439 17.33 +19.23
Total valid votes 25,611 100.00
Canadian federal election, 1965
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
New Democratic Norman Fawcett 10,863 41.32 +22.84
Liberal Osias Godin 10,374 39.46 -5.72
Progressive Conservative Roger Landry 5,055 19.23 -5.25
Total valid votes 26,292 100.00
Canadian federal election, 1963
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Liberal Osias Godin 13,414 45.18 -11.74
Progressive Conservative John MacLean 7,268 24.48 -4.54
New Democratic Carl Maitland Griffith 5,486 18.48 +7.80
Social Credit Oscar Degarie 3,524 11.87 +8.48
Total valid votes 29,692 100.00
Canadian federal election, 1962
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Liberal Osias Godin 16,440 56.92 +9.82
Progressive Conservative Don Gillis 8,381 29.02 -4.94
New Democratic Philippe Deaken 3,085 10.68 -8.26
Social Credit Oscar Degarie 978 3.39
Total valid votes 28,884 100.00

Note: NDP vote is compared to CCF vote in 1958 election.

Canadian federal election, 1958
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Liberal Osias Godin 11,866 47.10 +4.50
Progressive Conservative Anthony Falzetta 8,556 33.96 -2.22
Co-operative Commonwealth Harold Prescott 4,772 18.94 -2.29
Total valid votes 25,194 100.00
Canadian federal election, 1957
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Liberal Léoda Gauthier 8,819 42.60 -15.97
Progressive Conservative Anthony Falzetta 7,490 36.18 +15.30
Co-operative Commonwealth Harold A. Prescott 4,395 21.23 +5.23
Total valid votes 20,704 100.00
Canadian federal election, 1953
Party Candidate Votes %
Liberal Léoda Gauthier 8,821 58.56
Progressive Conservative Alistair MacLean 3,144 20.87
Co-operative Commonwealth Gilles Lefebvre 2,410 16.00
Labor–Progressive Harold Arthur Proctor 687 4.56
Total valid votes 15,062 100.00

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Notes[edit]