Nicklas Kulti

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Nicklas Kulti
Country  Sweden
Residence Stockholm, Sweden
Born (1971-04-22) April 22, 1971 (age 43)
Stockholm, Sweden
Height 1.90 m (6 ft 3 in)
Turned pro 1989
Retired 2000
Plays Right-handed (two-handed backhand)
Prize money $3,186,946
Singles
Career record 154–182
Career titles 3
Highest ranking No. 32 (May 3, 1993)
Grand Slam Singles results
Australian Open 3R (1989, 1994, 1996)
French Open QF (1992)
Wimbledon 2R (1992, 1997)
US Open 2R (1993, 1994)
Doubles
Career record 238–145
Career titles 13
Highest ranking No. 11 (September 29, 1997)
Grand Slam Doubles results
Australian Open 3R (1997, 1999, 2000)
French Open F (1995)
Wimbledon SF (2000)
US Open F (1997)
Last updated on: April 24, 2012.

Nicklas Kulti (born 22 April 1971) is a former professional tennis player from Sweden. He was born in Stockholm.

Tennis career[edit]

Juniors[edit]

Kulti was ranked No. 1 in the junior world singles rankings in 1989 after winning the Australian Open and Wimbledon junior titles, and finishing runner-up at the US Open.

Tournament 1988 1989
Junior Grand Slam Tournaments
Australian Open A W
French Open 2R QF
Wimbledon 2R W
US Open F F

Pro tour[edit]

In 1990, Kulti won his first top-level singles title at Adelaide. He won a total of three tour singles titles during his professional career. He also won 13 top-level doubles titles, including the Monte Carlo Masters in 1994 (partnering Magnus Larsson) and the Paris Masters in 2000 (partnering Max Mirnyi). Kulti was a men's doubles runner-up at the French Open in 1995 (with Larsson) and the US Open in 1997 (with Jonas Björkman). Kulti's best singles performance at a Grand Slam event came at the 1992 French Open, where he reached the quarter-finals before being knocked-out by Henri Leconte.[1]

Kulti was a member of the Swedish teams which won the Davis Cup in both 1997 and 1998 (partnering Björkman to win doubles rubbers in the final on both occasions). He was also on the team which finished runners-up in the Davis Cup in 1996. In the fifth and deciding match against Frenchman Arnaud Boetsch, Kulti was a late replacement for the injured Stefan Edberg. In a 4 hour and 46 minute thriller, Boetsch saved three matchpoints and finally overcame Kulti, 7–6, 2–6, 4–6, 7–6, 10–8.[2]

Kulti's career-high rankings were World No. 32 in singles (in 1993), and World No. 11 in doubles (in 1997). His career prize-money totalled $3,186,946. He retired from the professional tour in 2000. He runs the Good to Great Tennis Academy together with Magnus Norman and Mikael Tillström.

Doubles finals (25)[edit]

Outcome No. Date Tournament Surface Partner Opponents Score
Winner 1. 1992 Copenhagen, Denmark Carpet Sweden Magnus Larsson Netherlands Hendrik Jan Davids
Belgium Libor Pimek
6–3, 6–4
Winner 2. 1992 San Marino Clay Sweden Mikael Tillström Italy Cristian Brandi
Italy Federico Mordegan
6–2, 6–2
Winner 3. 1994 Monte Carlo, Monaco Clay Sweden Magnus Larsson Russia Yevgeny Kafelnikov
Czech Republic Daniel Vacek
3–6, 7–6, 6–4
Runner-up 1. 1994 Båstad, Sweden Clay Sweden Mikael Tillström Sweden Jan Apell
Sweden Jonas Björkman
2–6, 3–6
Runner-up 2. 1994 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Hard Sweden Lars-Anders Wahlgren Netherlands Jacco Eltingh
Netherlands Paul Haarhuis
0–6, 5–7
Runner-up 3. 1995 French Open, Paris Clay Sweden Magnus Larsson Netherlands Jacco Eltingh
Netherlands Paul Haarhuis
7–6, 4–6, 1–6
Winner 4. 1996 Antwerp, Belgium Carpet Sweden Jonas Björkman Russia Yevgeny Kafelnikov
Netherlands Menno Oosting
6–4, 6–4
Runner-up 4. 1996 St. Petersburg, Russia Carpet Sweden Peter Nyborg Russia Yevgeny Kafelnikov
Russia Andrei Olhovskiy
3–6, 4–6
Winner 5. 1996 New Delhi, India Hard Sweden Jonas Björkman Zimbabwe Byron Black
Australia Sandon Stolle
4–6, 6–4, 6–4
Runner-up 5. 1996 Monte Carlo, Monaco Clay Sweden Jonas Björkman South Africa Ellis Ferreira
Netherlands Jan Siemerink
6–3, 3–6, 2–6
Runner-up 6. 1996 Los Angeles, U.S. Hard Sweden Jonas Björkman South Africa Marius Barnard
South Africa Piet Norval
5–7, 2–6
Runner-up 7. 1996 New Haven, U.S. Hard Sweden Jonas Björkman Zimbabwe Byron Black
Canada Grant Connell
4–6, 4–6
Winner 6. 1997 Atlanta, U.S. Clay Sweden Jonas Björkman United States Scott Davis
United States Kelly Jones
6–2, 7–6
Winner 7. 1997 Båstad, Sweden Clay Sweden Mikael Tillström Sweden Magnus Gustafsson
Sweden Magnus Larsson
6–0, 6–3
Runner-up 8. 1997 Indianapolis, U.S. Hard Sweden Jonas Björkman Australia Michael Tebbutt
Sweden Mikael Tillström
3–6, 2–6
Runner-up 9. 1997 U.S. Open, New York Hard Sweden Jonas Björkman Russia Yevgeny Kafelnikov
Czech Republic Daniel Vacek
6–7, 3–6
Winner 8. 1998 St. Petersburg, Russia Carpet Sweden Mikael Tillström South Africa Marius Barnard
South Africa Brent Haygarth
3–6, 6–3, 7–6
Runner-up 10. 1998 Prague, Czech Republic Clay Sweden Fredrik Bergh Australia Wayne Arthurs
Australia Andrew Kratzmann
1–6, 1–6
Winner 9. 1998 Stockholm, Sweden Hard (i) Sweden Mikael Tillström South Africa Chris Haggard
Sweden Peter Nyborg
7–5, 3–6, 7–5
Runner-up 11. 1999 Båstad, Sweden Clay Sweden Mikael Tillström South Africa David Adams
United States Jeff Tarango
6–7, 4–6
Runner-up 12. 1999 Bournemouth, England Clay Germany Michael Kohlmann South Africa David Adams
United States Jeff Tarango
3–6, 7–6, 6–7
Winner 10. 2000 Barcelona, Spain Clay Sweden Mikael Tillström Netherlands Paul Haarhuis
Australia Sandon Stolle
6–2, 6–7, 7–6
Winner 11. 2000 Halle, Germany Grass Sweden Mikael Tillström India Mahesh Bhupathi
Germany David Prinosil
7–6, 7–6
Winner 12. 2000 Båstad, Sweden Clay Sweden Mikael Tillström Italy Andrea Gaudenzi
Italy Diego Nargiso
4–6, 6–2, 6–3
Winner 13. 2000 Paris Indoor, France Carpet Belarus Max Mirnyi Netherlands Paul Haarhuis
Canada Daniel Nestor
6–4, 7–5

Doubles performance timeline[edit]

Tournament 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 Career SR Career Win-Loss
Grand Slams
Australian Open A A A A A A A 1R 1R 3R 1R 3R 3R 2R 0 / 7 7–7
French Open A A A 1R A A 2R F QF 2R 1R SF 3R QF 0 / 9 19–9
Wimbledon A A A A A A 2R A QF QF QF 1R SF A 0 / 6 14–6
U.S. Open A A A A A A SF 3R 2R F 3R 1R 3R A 0 / 7 15–7
Grand Slam SR 0 / 0 0 / 0 0 / 0 0 / 1 0 / 0 0 / 0 0 / 3 0 / 3 0 / 4 0 / 4 0 / 4 0 / 4 0 / 4 0 / 2 0 / 29 N/A
Annual Win-Loss 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–1 0–0 0–0 6–3 7–3 6–4 11–4 5–4 6–4 10–4 4–2 N/A 55–29
ATP Masters Series
Indian Wells NME A A A A A 2R A QF A A A A 0 / 2 3–2
Miami NME A A A A A 2R A 3R A SF A 3R 0 / 4 6–4
Monte Carlo NME A A A A W 2R F SF 1R A QF A 1 / 6 13–5
Rome NME A A A A A A A A 2R A 2R A 0 / 2 2–2
Hamburg NME A A A A QF A A A A A A A 0 / 1 2–1
Canada NME A A A A A A SF A A A A A 0 / 1 3–1
Cincinnati NME A A A A 1R A QF A A A A A 0 / 2 2–2
Stuttgart (Stockholm) NME A A 1R 1R QF A A A 1R 1R 1R A 0 / 6 2–6
Paris NME A A A A 2R A 1R 2R QF A W A 1 / 5 6–4
Masters Series SR N/A 0 / 0 0 / 0 0 / 1 0 / 1 1 / 5 0 / 3 0 / 4 0 / 4 0 / 4 0 / 2 1 / 4 0 / 1 2 / 29 N/A
Annual Win-Loss N/A 0–0 0–0 0–1 0–1 10–4 1–3 8–4 6–4 3–4 4–2 5–3 1–1 N/A 39–27
Year End Ranking 484 271 206 592 213 489 23 50 16 16 38 37 15 155 N/A

A = did not attend tournament

References[edit]

  1. ^ Sally Jenkins (June 15, 1992). "Down And Dirty". SI.com. Retrieved 29 March 2012. 
  2. ^ "Tennis: Boetsch thrills France". The Independent. 2 December 1996. Retrieved 29 March 2012. 

External links[edit]