Nicola Bombacci

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Nicola Bombacci
Nicola Bombacci.jpg
Deputy in the Italian Parliament
In office
1 December 1919 – 25 January 1925
Personal details
Born (1879-10-24)24 October 1879
Civitella di Romagna, Forlì
Kingdom of Italy
Died 28 April 1945(1945-04-28) (aged 65)
Dongo, Como
Kingdom of Italy
Nationality Italian
Political party Italian Socialist Party
(1911–1921)
Communist Party of Italy
(1921–1927)
Republican Fascist Party
(1943–1945)
Spouse(s) Erissene Focaccia (m. 1905–45); his death
Children Raoul (1906–?)
Raoul (1914–?)
Wladimiro (1922–2005)
Annamaria Bombacci (19??–?)
Profession Politician, journalist, revolutionary, labour unionist
Religion None (Atheism)

Nicola Bombacci (24 October 1879 – 28 April 1945), born at Civitella di Romagna, was an Italian Marxist socialist who was a member of the Italian Socialist Party in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and who later became an Italian Fascist. Initially a friend and disciple of Lenin, in 1921 he became one of the founding fathers of the Italian Communist Party.[1] Bombacci was a friend of future Italian Fascist dictator Benito Mussolini. Later in life, although he was not an official card-carrying member of the Fascist Party, Bombacci tried to help Mussolini legitimize the Italian Social Republic and relegitimize Italian Fascism after Mussolini was ousted as Prime Minister of the Kingdom of Italy.[2]

He was the author of the economic theory of socialization in 1943.

Bombacci was shot on 28 April 1945 at Dongo (CO) where he had been captured along with Mussolini by Italian communist partisans. After his death, he was hung upside down at Piazzale Loreto in a public display, along with Mussolini, Clara Petacci, the head of the Republican Fascist Party Alessandro Pavolini, and others.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Mack Smith, Denis (1994). Mussolini. London: Phoenix. p. 312. ISBN 1-85799-240-7. 
  2. ^ Smith, Denis Mack (1983). Vintage. p. 317. ISBN 0-394-71658-2.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  3. ^ Steve Cole (August 5, 2009). "The Execution of Mussolini".