Nicole Eisenman

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Nicole Eisenman (born 1965 in Verdun, France) is an American artist who is known primarily for her paintings. Eisenman was a professor at Bard College in Annandale-on-Hudson from 2003–2009.[1] She has been awarded the Guggenheim fellowship (1996), the Carnegie Prize (2013), and has twice been included in the Whitney Biennial (1995, 2012).[2] Eisenman currently lives and works in Brooklyn.[3][4]

Early life[edit]

Nicole Eisenman was born in 1965 in Verdun, France[5] where her father was stationed as an Army psychiatrist. She grew up in Scarsdale, New York[6][7] and graduated from the Rhode Island School of Design in 1987.[8] She is the niece of architect Peter Eisenman.[citation needed]

Work[edit]

Eisenman's figural oil paintings often toy with themes of sexuality, comedy, and caricature.[9] Though she is known for her paintings, the artist also creates installations, drawings, prints, and sculptures.[9] With A.L. Steiner, she is the co-founder of the queer/feminist curatorial initiative Ridykeulous.[10]

Eisenman is represented by the Leo Koenig Gallery[11] in New York City and Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects in Los Angeles.

Partial Exhibition History[edit]

Solo exhibitions[edit]

Group exhibitions[edit]


Recognition[edit]

Eisenman has been awarded numerous grants and prizes including the Guggenheim Fellowship (1996),[18] the Carnegie Prize,[19] the Anonymous Was a Woman Award (2014) and the Louis Comfort Tiffany Grant (1995).[2]

Collections[edit]

The artist's work can be found in a number of institutions, including:

Bibliography[edit]

  • Nicole Eisenman: Behavior (Rice Gallery, 1998)
  • Nicole Eisenman: Selected works 1993-2003 (Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art, 2003)
  • Nicole Eisenman: Selected Works 1994-2004 ed. Victor Mathieu (Walther König, 2008)
  • Nicole Eisenman: The Way We Weren't (Frances Young Tang Teaching Museum and Art Gallery, 2010)
  • Nicole Eisenman ed. Beatrix Ruf (JRP-Ringier, 2011)
  • Parkett no. 91 (Parkett Verlag, 2012)
  • Nicole Eisenman: Dear Nemesis, 1993-2013 (Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis/Walther König, 2014)

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Nicole Eisenman", 2013 Carnegie International, Retrieved 11 August 2014.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g "Nicole Eisenman CV", Koening & CLinton, Retrieved 7 September 2014.
  3. ^ http://whitney.org/Exhibitions/2012Biennial/NicoleEisenman
  4. ^ Kotz, Liz (October 1993). "Nicole Eisenman". Artforum International  – via Questia (subscription required). Retrieved 25 November 2013. 
  5. ^ "Koenig & Clinton - Nicole Eisenman", Koenig and Clinton, Retrieved 10 August 2014.
  6. ^ "Even the Art Museums Can't Escape Her Barbs", New York Times, Retrieved 7 September 2014
  7. ^ "BUTT JOHNSON INTERVIEWS NICOLE EISENMAN", ReReveal, Retrieved 7 September 2014
  8. ^ http://www.vielmetter.com/artists/nicole-eisenman/biography.html
  9. ^ a b c "Eisenmann", Kunsthalle Zurich, 11 August 2014.
  10. ^ "Readykeulous by Ridykeulous: This is What Liberation Feels Like™", CAM, Retrieved 13 September 2014
  11. ^ Burton, Johanna (July 2004). "Nicole Eisenman". Artforum International  – via HighBeam Research (subscription required). Retrieved 25 November 2013. 
  12. ^ "Dear Nemesis, Nicole Eisenman 1993-2013",Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis, January 2014-April 2014. Retrieved 17 February 2015.
  13. ^ "Dear Nemesis: Nicole Eisenman 1993-2013", ICA Philadelphia, Retrieved 11 August 2014.
  14. ^ Inde, Vilis (1998). Art in the Courtroom. Praeger  – via Questia (subscription required). p. 40. 
  15. ^ Herbert, Martin (November 2012). "London Round-up". Art Monthly  – via Questia (subscription required). Retrieved 25 November 2013. 
  16. ^ "Artists - Manifesta10", Manifesta, Retrieved 11 August 2014.
  17. ^ "MoMa | The Forever Now: Contemporary Painting in an Atemporal World", MoMA, Retrieved 6 March, 2015.
  18. ^ "Nicole Eisenman - John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation", John Simon Guggenheim Foundation, Retrieved 11 August 2014.
  19. ^ , the Carnegie Prize (2013) "Wielding a New Medium, Nicole Eisenman Wins the Carnegie Prize". , ArtInfo, Retrieved 10 August 2014.
  20. ^ "Eisenman, Nicole", Art Institute of Chicago, Retrieved 11 August 2014.

External links[edit]