Nigel Finch

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Nigel Lucius Graeme Finch (1 August 1949 – 14 February 1995) was an English film director and filmmaker whose career influenced the growth of British gay cinema.[1]

Biography[edit]

Nigel Finch was born in Tenterden, Kent, the son of Graham and Tibby Finch, and raised in Bromley, south east London. He studied art history at the University of Sussex.[2]

Finch began working as co-editor for the BBC television documentary series Arena in the early 1970s.[2] He produced and directed many notable programs including My Way (1978), and The Private Life of the Ford Cortina (1982). He rose to prominence with the documentary Chelsea Hotel (1981), which profiled the famed New York hotel and its legacy of famous gay guests, including Oscar Wilde, Tennessee Williams, William S. Burroughs, Quentin Crisp and Andy Warhol. His documentary subjects include artist Robert Mapplethorpe (1988), filmmaker Kenneth Anger (1991),[1] and artist Louise Bourgeois (1994). Finch went on to direct films such as the BAFTA-nominated drama The Lost Language of Cranes, and the musical soap opera The Vampyr.

Finch died from AIDS-related illness in London in 1995 during post-production of his first full-length feature film Stonewall, a docudrama loosely based on events leading up to the 1969 Stonewall riots in New York City.[3][2]

Filmography[edit]

Year Title Role Notes
1978 Fear and Loathing in Gonzovision director; producer Omnibus series TV documentary; also known as Fear and Loathing on the Road to Hollywood
1978 My Way director Arena series TV documentary
1980 The Errand director short film
1981 Did You Miss Me? director Arena series TV documentary
1981 Chelsea Hotel director Arena series TV documentary of the Hotel Chelsea in New York City
1982 The Private Life of the Ford Cortina director Arena series TV documentary
1983 Kurt Vonnegut , Jr: "Deadeye Dick" director Arena series TV documentary
1984 The Caravaggio Conspiracy director
1985 Ligmalion: A Musical for the 80s director; producer TV film
1986 Raspberry Ripple director TV film
1986 Shergar director Screen Two TV series episode (Season 2, Episode 11)
1988 Robert Mapplethorpe director Arena series TV documentary featuring Robert Mapplethorpe
1988 Whatever Lola Wants director Bergerac TV series episode
1989 25x5: The Continuing Adventures of the Rolling Stones director TV documentary
1991 Kenneth Anger director documentary about film-maker Kenneth Anger
1991 The Lost Language of Cranes director TV film; also 1992 Screen Two TV series episode (Season 8, Episode 4)
1992–1993 The Vampyr: A Soap Opera director TV film
1993 Tales of Rock 'N' Roll: Peggy Sue director Arena series TV documentary on the Buddy Holly song "Peggy Sue"
1994 Louise Bourgeois: No Trespassing director
1995 Stonewall director

Accolades[edit]

Year Award Category Nominated work Result
1988 BAFTA TV Award Best Factual Series Arena TV series Nominated
1989 BAFTA TV Award Best Factual Series Arena TV series Won
1990 BAFTA TV Award Best Factual Series Arena TV series Nominated
1991 BAFTA TV Award Best Factual Series Arena TV series Nominated
1992 BAFTA TV Award Best Factual Series Arena TV series Nominated
1981 Chicago International Film Festival Gold Hugo Best Short Film The Errand Nominated
1995 BFI London Film Festival Audience Award Stonewall Won
1996 Frameline Film Festival Audience Award Stonewall Won

Nigel Finch's death was commemorated in the ending title of the opera-film "Dido and Aeneas" (1995) directed by Peter Maniura (conducted by Richard Hickox. See the corresponding entry in Dido and Aeneas discography).

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Forde, John (2006). Routledge International Encyclopedia of Queer Culture. London: Routledge. p. 217. 
  2. ^ a b c Williams, Nigel (17 February 1995). "Obituary: Nigel Finch". The Independent. Retrieved 26 September 2012. 
  3. ^ Levy, Emanuel (July 23, 1996). "Riot Girls". The Advocate (Liberation Publications Inc.): 51–53. 

External links[edit]