Nigel Williamson

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Nigel Williamson (born 1954) is a British journalist.

Biography[edit]

Educated at University College London, Williamson worked as a reporter on Tribune (1982–84) and was then briefly its literary editor (1984) before becoming editor (1984–87) as successor to Chris Mullin. Just before the 1987 general election he was hired as the editor of the Labour Party's members' magazine Labour Party News (1987–89), to which he added the editorship of the party's monthly New Socialist (1987–89) replacing Stuart Weir. He also served as a press officer to Labour leader Neil Kinnock during the 1987 general election.

In 1989 Williamson joined The Times as a reporter, becoming diary editor (1990–92), then home news editor (1992–95) and Whitehall correspondent (1995–96). He writes on pop and world music for a variety of publications, including the magazines Uncut and Songlines. He has also written books, including Journey Through The Past: The Stories Behind The Classic Songs Of Neil Young, The Rough Guide to Bob Dylan, The Rough Guide to Led Zeppelin, The Rough Guide to The Best Music You've Never Heard and The Rough Guide to the Blues.[1]

Williamson is also a member of Kent County Cricket Club. Recently he expressed his concern over Kent's logo rebrand in 2010, calling it "banal and meaningless".[2] In 2011, Williamson and fellow member Graham Holland started a campaign for more open and accountable management of Kent County Cricket Club and for the club's first contested committee election since 2008.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Nigel Williamson". Rough Guides. Retrieved 9 September 2010. 
  2. ^ "Kent County Cricket Club launch new logo". Kentonline.co.uk. 2010-11-08. Retrieved 2011-08-14. 
  3. ^ "Angry Kent members seek election". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 2011-08-14. 
Preceded by
Chris Mullin
Editor of Tribune
1984–1987
Succeeded by
Phil Kelly