Nihon SF Taikai

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The Nihon SF Taikai (日本SF大会 Japan SF Convention?) is an annual science fiction convention held in Japan. Each of these conventions is officially the Nth Nihon SF Taikai (第N回日本SF大会?), but they are more popularly known by the official nicknames given to them based on their locations, e.g. TOKON (when it is held in Tokyo) or DAICON (when it is held in Osaka).

Each year the Nihon SF Taikai attracts between 1,000 and 1,500 science fiction fans. Events at the convention include panel discussions, lectures, readings, screenings, parties, games, concerts, and a dealing room for the sale of rare books, magazines, and other items related to science fiction.

A number of prizes are awarded at the convention, most notably the Seiun Award for the best science fiction of the year as voted by attendees of the convention.

Outside of Japan, the Nihon SF Taikai is most famous for the animation for the opening ceremonies of DAICON IV, which was produced by the animators that later became Gainax. The DAICON IV opening video features a girl in a Playboy Bunny suit with cameos from many science fiction films and stories. The DAICON IV opening video is a hallmark of otaku culture and has appeared in many otaku-related artwork and TV shows, notably FLCL and Densha Otoko.

List of Taikai locations[edit]

  1. 1962 - Tokyo - MEG-CON
  2. 1963 - Tokyo - TOKON
  3. 1964 - Osaka - DAICON
  4. 1965 - Tokyo - TOKON 2
  5. 1966 - Nagoya - MEICON
  6. 1967 - Tokyo - TOKON 3
  7. 1968 - Tokyo - TOKON 4
  8. 1969 - Kumamoto-ken - KYUKON
  9. 1970 - Tokyo - TOKON 5
  10. 1971 - Osaka - DAICON 2
  11. 1972 - Nagoya - MEICON 2
  12. 1973 - Hokkaidō - EZOCON
  13. 1974 - Kyoto - MIYACON
  14. 1975 - Kobe - SHINCON
  15. 1975 - Tokyo - TOKON 6
  16. 1977 - Yokohama - HINCON
  17. 1978 - Kanagawa-ken - ASHINOCON
  18. 1979 - Nagoya - MEICON 3
  19. 1980 - Tokyo - TOKON 7
  20. 1981 - Osaka - DAICON 3
  21. 1982 - Tokyo - TOKON 8
  22. 1983 - Osaka - DAICON 4
  23. 1984 - Hokkaidō - EZOCON 2
  24. 1985 - Niigata-ken - GATACON Special Summer Fest
  25. 1986 - Osaka - DAICON 5
  26. 1987 - Ishikawa-ken - URACON '87
  27. 1988 - Gunma-ken - MiG-CON
  28. 1989 - Nagoya - DAINA CON EX
  29. 1990 - Tokyo - TOKON 9
  30. 1991 - Kanazawa - i-CON
  31. 1992 - KANAGAWA(Yokohama) - HAMACON
  32. 1993 - Osaka - DAICON 6
  33. 1994 - Okinawa - RYUCON
  34. 1995 - Shizuoka(Hamamatsu) - はまなこん (Hamanacon)
  35. 1996 - Kitakyushu - コクラノミコン (Kokuranomicon)
  36. 1997 - Hiroshima - あきこん (Akicon)
  37. 1998 - Nagoya (Mars) - CAPRICON 1
  38. 1999 - Nagano-ken - やねこん (Yanecon)
  39. 2000 - KANAGAWA(Yokohama) - Zero-CON
  40. 2001 - Chiba-ken(Makuhari) - SF2001 International Future Confererence (未来国際会議 Mirai Kokusai Kaigi?)
  41. 2002 - Shimane-ken - ゆ~こん (Yūcon)
  42. 2003 - Tochigi-ken (Shiobara Hot Springs Village) - T-3
  43. 2004 - Gifu - G-CON
  44. 2005 - KANAGAWA(Yokohama) - HAMACON 2
  45. 2006 - Matsushima - みちのくSF祭ずんこん (Michinoku SF Matsuri Zuncon)
  46. 2007 - KANAGAWA(Yokohama) - Nippon2007 65th World Science Fiction Convention
  47. 2008 - Osaka - DAICON 7
  48. 2009 - Tochigi-ken(Shiobara, Tochigi|Shiobara Hot Springs Village) - T-con 2009
  49. 2010 - Tokyo(edogawa-ku) - TOKON 10
  50. 2011 - shizuoka - DONBURACON
  51. 2012 - Hokkaidō(Yuubari) - VARICON
  52. 2013 - Hiroshima - KOICON

External links[edit]