Nikon D100

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Nikon D100
Nikon D100.jpg
Type dSLR
Sensor Nikon DX format 23.7 mm × 15.6 mm CCD
Maximum resolution 3,008 × 2,000 (6.0 megapixels)
Lens Interchangeable, Nikon F-mount
Shutter vertical-travel focal-plane shutter
Shutter speed range 30 to 1/4000s, bulb mode
Exposure metering 10 segment
Focus modes CAM 900, standard Nikon AF
Continuous shooting 3 frame/s (6 frame buffer)
Viewfinder 95% frame coverage, 0.8× magnification, Optical pentaprism
ASA/ISO range 200-1600 ISO in 1/3EV steps, 6400 special mode
Rear LCD monitor 1.8-inch (46 mm) 118,000 pixel TFT
Storage CompactFlash (Type I or Type II) or Hitachi Microdrive
Weight approx. 700 g
Made in Japan

The Nikon D100 is a discontinued 6-megapixel digital single-lens reflex camera designed for professionals and advanced hobbyists. It was introduced on February 21, 2002 at the PMA Annual Convention and Trade Show as a direct competitor to the Canon EOS D60. With a price of $1,999 for the body only in the US, it was the second 6-megapixel DSLR to break the $2000 barrier, after the EOS D60.

Although the name D100 suggested that it was a digital version of the Nikon F100, the camera design more closely resembles the Nikon F80 (also known as Nikon N80 in U.S.), which is a much more consumer-oriented camera than the professional F100. The price of the camera dropped over time to $1699 in May 2003, and $1499 in December 2003. In the Spring of 2004 Nikon released the D70, which offered similar features to the D100 at a lower price of $999. However, Nikon continued to produce the D100 until 2005 when a more advanced and professional-oriented successor, the Nikon D200, was released.

Features[edit]

  • 6.0 effective megapixels rendering 3,008 x 2,000-pixel images[1][2]
  • CCD sensor with ISO 200-6400
  • Raw (Nikon NEF - compressed or uncompressed), JPEG (specifically JFIF), or TIFF
  • 3D Matrix Metering - 10 sensor matrix meter
  • Custom / Preset, Fixed or Auto White Balance options
  • Built-in Speedlight with D-TTL flash control - 18 GN [at ISO 200]
  • Three color modes (sRGB I, Adobe RGB, and sRGB III, (wider gamut of greens and blues)
  • Five-Area Autofocus with CAM-900 chip
  • Top shutter speed of 1/4,000s and flash sync speed up to 1/180s.
  • Has a self-timer, allowing times of 2, 5, 10 and 20s
  • USB 1.1 interface
  • Compatible with CompactFlash cards Type I and Type II including IBM (and Hitachi's) MicroDrive hard drives up to 4 GB. Firmware v2.0 is required for body to recognize cards/drives larger than 2 GB, and cards/drives must be initially formatted as FAT32 in a computer. (Early v1.x firmware supported FAT16 only, so without the firmware upgrade the D100 will only be able to use or "see" 2 GB of available memory on larger cards.)
  • Optional Multi Function Battery Pack MB-D100 accepts six 1.5 V LR6 (AA-size alkaline) batteries or one or two Li-Ion EN-EL3 batteries for extended shooting capability. Features voice memo recording/playback function, vertical shutter release button, Command and Sub Command Dials, AF start button and a 10-pin remote terminal.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Nikon USA: D100 Specifications
  2. ^ DPReview: Nikon D100 Specifications

External links[edit]

 
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