Nils Bielke

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For other members of Bielke family, see Bielke.
Nils Bielke by David Richter the Younger.

Count Nils Bielke (7 February 1644, Stockholm – 26 November 1716) was a member of the High Council of Sweden, military and politician.

Born the eldest son of Baron Ture Nilsson Bielke, who died in 1648, Queen Christina granted the young boy the barony of Korpo in the archipelago of Finland Proper in 1649.[1] He married countess Eva Horn, one of the heiresses of the sonless field marshal Count Gustav Horn af Björneborg.[1]

Nils Bielke entered the service of the Swedish Army and the Royal Court in the 1660s. He was appointed Lieutenant General in 1678, Governor-General of Swedish Estonia in 1687 and Swedish Pomerania (1687–98). He became Field Marshal in 1690.

During the Scanian War (1675–1679), he made important contributions both as a troop organizer and as an officer on the field. He especially distinguished himself at the Battle of Lund in 1676 as the commander of the Royal Cavalry Guard (Livregementet till häst).

He was Sweden's ambassador in France from 1679–1682 and 1684–1687, he took part in Emperor Leopold I's Great Turkish War. He was created Reichsgraf in the Holy Roman Empire. Charles XI of Sweden later allowed him comital rank in Sweden.

Nils Bielke was dissatisfied with Charles XI's despotic policy towards the old aristocracy. As the governor of Swedish Pomerania it was only reluctantly that he took part in the reduction of property belonging to the nobility. In addition to this, he undertook private negotiations in order to push Sweden towards a pro-French policy against the wishes of the Swedish government.

As a result of this, he lost his position in 1698 and after a long legal process, he was sentenced to death in 1705. He was, however, pardoned and in 1715, he was redeemed.

Niiles Bielke (son of Tuure Bielke, see baronial family Bielke) born 7 February 1644 Stockholm, died 26 November 1716, Salsta castle, was

hero of the Battle of Lund, 1676 a Swedish Baron, later Count, military, royal council, diplomat, politician, lieutenant-general in 1678, Ambassador to France 1679-82, Governor General of Pomerania in 1687, Field Marshal 1690

1.Reichsgraf zu Torgelow, 1.Greve till Salsta, 2.Baron of Korppoo island, 5.Friherre af Kråkerum, lord of Tureholm and Geddeholm, Field Marshal, Governor-General of Pomerania

He started life as a baron, but when created a Count of the Holy Roman Empire, he received royal Swedish permission to receive that rank. He was a Swedish General-Fieldmarshal and was employed as Governor-General of Pomerania. From 1679 until 1682 he was the Swedish Ambassador in Paris. Wife with him. One of their children was born in Paris, France.

During the Scanian War (1675–1679), Bielke made important contributions both as a troop organizer and as an officer on the field. He especially distinguished himself at the Battle of Lund in 1676 as the commander of the Royal Cavalry Guard. As commander of the Mounted Life Regiment he participated in the Battle of Lund 1676. There, he distinguished himself by taking command of the troops remained on the battlefield, then King, Charles XI chased after the fleeing Danish cavalry. Charles XI appreciated his courage, and said after the battle that "my crown hung on Bielke's sword / lance, and that "next to God, my brave Bielke and life regiment to thank for the victory" Charles XI is said to have commented after the victory: "next to God, I have to thank the brave Bielke and his regiment". Battle of Lund 1676. "Today the Swedish crown danced on the tip of Bielke's lance/ sword" is a familiar opinion that Karl XI dropped after the battle.

Field Marshal Niiles Bielke has entered also in Europe's military history. Helped the Holy Roman Emperor against the Turks in Hungary: 1684–1687, he took part in Emperor Leopold I's Great Turkish War. He was created Reichsgraf in the Holy Roman Empire.

Even as a child Niiles Bielke received in 1649 the barony of Korppoo island, a tiny fief in the Turku archipelago.

Bielke used already in mother-in-law's lifetime the Ervalla manor for horse breeding. Otherwise, delivered regularly from the farm grain, other farm products and game to Siiri Bielke's household in her house in Stockholm and at the farm Vik in Uppland.

Bielke went with count Klaus Tott, count of Kaarlepori, the 1661-62 on an embassy to France and devoted himself for some years to service in Royal court. At twenty-nine years of age, he was appointed Colonel of the Household Regiment of horse, distinguished himself in Carl XI's Danish campaign.

the regiment was still standing, and who saved the situation was the Life regiment, Household Regiment led by Bielke. The king later said that his crown literally just then hung on Bielke's lance because he had next to God "my brave Bielke and Life regiment" to thank for the victory. The famous sword is still in the place of honor in the Bielke family possession.

hero of the Battle of Lund 1676, on the 4 December 1676 Charles XI said that "Swedish crown hung on Bielke's swordtip".

1678 Bielke was promoted to lieutenant general, sent the following year as ambassador to France.

in 1685 in the service of German Emperor. He was promoted to General and count in 1686 after the participated in several battles.

Once called home to his native country, he was named in a single year in 1687 to the royal council, Governor General of Pomerania, General of cavalry and infantry, and the rank of Count. Nevertheless, his position over Carl XI's last reign years was very shaky and he went finally to the utter disgrace.

Bielke was one of our country's most colorful figures in the Caroline autocracy time. As a friend of Charles XI appointed him Governor-General of the prestigious Pomerania. Karl XI's death changed everything. He was put under house arrest and accused of treason. The book by Ingvar Erikkson highlights was a talented and versatile Caroline bellwether with vision far beyond the ordinary.

Bielke was dissatisfied with Charles XI's despotic policy towards the old aristocracy. As the governor of Swedish Pomerania it was only reluctantly that he took part in the Great Reduction of property belonging to the nobility. In addition to this, he undertook private negotiations in order to push Sweden towards a pro-French policy against the wishes of the Swedish government.

As a result of this, he lost his position in 1698

After Charles XII's ascension to the throne, Bielke accused of numerous abuses of power, such as willfully violated the king's commandments and precepts, having addressed through coin deterioration, etc., for which all he Court of Appeal sentenced the life, honor and property. Life was given to him by the king's mercy; honor he kept - says a memorial sign - in many a man's mind, but all his movable property, which he acquired in the Hungarian campaign, was lost and of real estate he only got to keep Geddeholm and Salsta. The entire trial was considered to be the result of a court intrigue, for which Bielke suspected Kaarle Piper as the instigator.

On Salsta castle was a large library of books that belonged to members of the House Bielke for many generations. The library was together with the stables in a wooden building on the avenue leading up to the castle. Niiles Bielke self-designed the building with a library room surrounded by stables, barn chamber, armory and turning chambers. His wife Eeva Horn contributed to the library by bringing in a book collection she inherited from her mother Siiri Bielke.

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