Nimlot C

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Nimlot C
High Priest of Amun in Thebes
Relief Osorkon B Lepsius.jpg
Osorkon B, grandson of Nimlot C, at Karnak; Nimlot is mentioned in the inscription above him
Predecessor ?
Successor Takelot F
Dynasty 22nd Dynasty
Pharaoh Osorkon II
Father Osorkon II
Mother Djedmutesankh
Children Takelot II, Karomama II, Djedptahefankh, Shepensopdet A

Nimlot C was a High Priest of Amun at Thebes during the reign of pharaoh Osorkon II of the 22nd Dynasty.

Biography[edit]

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Nimlot[1]
in hieroglyphs

From the stela of Pasenhor it is known that Nimlot C was a son of pharaoh Osorkon II and his queen Djedmutesankh (her name is also found written "Mut-udj-ankhes").[2]

Even before becoming High Priest of Amun he already held various positions such as Count, Governor of Upper Egypt, General and army leader, High Priest of Heryshaf, Chief of Pi-sekhemkheperre and of Herakleopolis, as shown on the Cairo Museum stele JdE 45327 dating to Year 16 of Osorkon II.[3] After this date he received the office of High Priest of Amun in Thebes,[4] leaving the government of Herakleopolis to one of his son.[5]

There is no record about his mandate, hence it possibly was quite brief.[6] He died before the end of his father's reign since his son Takelot F (the future king Takelot II) succeeded him in office as High Priest of Amun towards the end of Osorkon II's reign.[7] This is established from the reliefs of Temple J at Karnak which depicts the High Priest Takelot F as the dedicant at a religious ceremony and mentions the ruling king of Egypt as pharaoh Osorkon II.[8] Temple J has been dated to the final years of Osorkon II's reign.

Family[edit]

Sitting statue of Shepensopdet A. Cairo Museum CG42228

His family relationships are attested on several monuments. He was married to Tentsepeh C, and was the father of several children:[9]

  • Takelot F, his successor as High Priest of Amun and later pharaoh Takelot II;
  • Karomama II, later Great Royal Wife of her brother Takelot II;
  • Djedptahefankh (also written Ptahudjankhef), his successor as governor of Herakleopolis;
  • Shepensopdet A, another daughter.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Nicolas Grimal, A History of Ancient Egypt, Oxford, Blackwell Books, 1992, appendix.
  2. ^ Kitchen, op. cit., § 85.
  3. ^ Kitchen, op. cit., § 86.
  4. ^ Kitchen, op. cit., § 157.
  5. ^ Kitchen, op. cit., § 300.
  6. ^ Kitchen, op. cit., § 162.
  7. ^ David Aston, "Takelot II, A King of the 'Theban Twenty-Third Dynasty?'", JEA 75 (1989), p.147
  8. ^ Donald Redford in Orientalia 55 (1986), p.14 n.89
  9. ^ Kitchen, op. cit., §§ 70, 85, 86, t10.

Bibliography[edit]