Nimloth

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In the fantasy world of J. R. R. Tolkien, Nimloth, Sindarin for "white blossom",[1] was the name of the White Tree of Númenor. Nimloth was a seedling of Celeborn, which was a seedling of Galathilion, which was created by Yavanna in the image of Telperion, one of the Two Trees of Valinor.

When the Númenóreans came under the influence of Sauron, they cut down Nimloth as a sacrifice to Melkor. Isildur saved one of the fruits of the tree and from it came the white trees of Gondor.

Nimloth was also the name of the daughter of Galathil, son of Galadhon, son of Elmo. Elmo is the brother of Olwë and Elwë. Nimloth later married Dior the Beautiful, her second cousin once removed. Her children were Eluréd, Elurín and Elwing. She was known also as Lady Lindis.

She was later slain in the Kinslaying of Menegroth.

For more on this character see the article entitled "Dior Eluchíl"

The Line of Nimloth[edit]

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Melian
 
Thingol
 
Elmo
 
Olwë
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Beren
 
Lúthien
 
 
 
Galadhon
 
Eärwen
 
Finarfin
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Galathil
 
 
 
Celeborn
 
Galadriel
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Dior
 
Nimloth
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Eluréd
Elurín
 
Elwing
 
Eärendil
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Elros
 
Elrond
 
Celebrían
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Kings of Númenor
Lords of Andúnië
Kings of Arnor
Kings of Arthedain
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Aragorn
 
Arwen
 
Elladan
Elrohir
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Eldarion

Colour key:
     Elves
     Men
     Maiar
     Half-elven
     Half-elven who chose the fate of elves
     Half-elven who chose the fate of mortal men

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Source: Robert Foster, The Complete Guide to Middle-earth.