Ninety-Nine Nights II

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N3II: Ninety-Nine Nights
N3IIcoverNTSC.jpg
North American cover art
Developer(s) feelplus
Q Entertainment
Publisher(s) Konami
Director(s) Kenichiro Tsukuda
Producer(s) Tak Fujii
Writer(s) Matsuzo Machida
Platform(s) Xbox 360
Release date(s)
  • NA June 29, 2010
  • JP July 22, 2010
  • AUS September 9, 2010
  • EU September 10, 2010
Genre(s) Hack and slash, RPG
Mode(s) Single-player, Multiplayer
Distribution Optical disc

N3II: Ninety-Nine Nights, (or Ninety-Nine Nights II) is a role-playing video game with hack and slash game mechanics set in a high fantasy game universe, based around the concept of a rising demon army with one million troops. It is a sequel to the video game Ninety-Nine Nights. The game was announced a the TGS 2008 conference - a demo for the game was released on the Xbox Live marketplace on May 27, 2010, and the game release between June and September in North America, Japan, and European regions.

Gameplay[edit]

There are multiple story modes; the main story of the game focuses on the character Galen. Combat is hack and slash with similarities to Koei's Dynasty and Samurai warriors series.

In addition to a single player mode there are co-op modes, online modes.

Plot[edit]

Development[edit]

The game was officially unveiled at Microsoft Game Studios's TGS 2008 press conference, exclusively for Xbox 360.[1]

Developed by feelplus, the game's art style is noticeably darker than its predecessor.

At the Konami E3 (2010) press conference, the lead producer of the series, Tak Fujii noted that the sequel has been vastly improved technically, allowing millions of troops to be present on screen in one shot. Some of the main changes the sequel introduces include an online co-op mode, leaderboards and brand new difficulty levels which make the game even harder.[2]

After the press conference Tak Fujii was also interviewed by G4TV[3] and GameSpot.[4]

Reception[edit]

The game received poor reviews, with a Metacritic score of 45 out of 100 based on 43 reviews.[5] Both IGN and Gamespot reviews criticised the gameplay, plot, as well as poor lip-syncing, noting an absence of challenge in core gameplay as well as frustrating boss fights.[6][7]

References[edit]

External links[edit]