Nintendo Entertainment Analysis & Development

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Nintendo
Entertainment Analysis & Development
Native name 任天堂 情報開発
Romanized name Nintendo Information Development
Type Division
Industry Video games
Predecessor(s) Nintendo R&D4 (1989)
Nintendo R&D1, R&D2 (2003)
Founded Kyoto, Japan
(1983 (1983), as Nintendo R&D4)
(1989 (1989), as Nintendo EAD)
Founder(s) Hiroshi Yamauchi
Headquarters Kyoto, Japan
Number of locations 2 (Kyoto and Tokyo, Japan)
Key people Shigeru Miyamoto (General Manager)
Takashi Tezuka (Executive Officer)
Hideki Konno (Group Manager)
Eiji Aonuma (Group Manager)
Yoshiaki Koizumi (Group Manager)
Koji Kondo (Composer)
Products List of games developed
Employees ~720[1] (EAD Kyoto)
Parent Nintendo
Divisions Kyoto Software Development
Tokyo Software Development
Technology Development

The Nintendo Entertainment Analysis & Development (Japanese: 任天堂 情報開発本部 Hepburn: Nintendō Jōhō Kaihatsu Honbu?, lit. Nintendo Information Development Division) (or Nintendo EAD) division, formerly Nintendo Research & Development 4 (or Nintendo R&D4), is the largest division inside Nintendo. It was preceded by the Creative Department (クリエイティブ課 Kurieitibu Ka?), a team of designers with an art background responsible for many different tasks, to which Shigeru Miyamoto and Takashi Tezuka originally belonged.[2][3] Both developers currently serve as managers of the EAD studios and are credited in each game developed by the division, with varying degrees of involvement. EAD is best known for its work on games in the Mario, The Legend of Zelda, Animal Crossing, F-Zero, Star Fox, and Pikmin franchises.

History[edit]

Background[edit]

During the 1970's, when Nintendo was still predominantly a toy company, the company decided to expand into the interactive entertainment and video game industry and hired several designers to work under the Creative Department, which at the time was then the only development department at Nintendo. Among these new designers was Makoto Kano, which went on to design various Game & Watch games, and Shigeru Miyamoto, which would create various Nintendo franchises in the future. In 1972, the department was renamed to Research & Development Department and was comprised of about 20 employees. The department was later consolidated into a division and separated into three departments, Nintendo R&D1, R&D2 and R&D3.

1983-1989: Creation as Research & Development 4[edit]

The success of Shigeru Miyamoto's Donkey Kong arcade game was a deciding factor in the creation of Nintendo R&D4.

After the success of Donkey Kong, a game designed by Shigeru Miyamoto, the then Nintendo president Hiroshi Yamauchi decided that in addition to the already existing research and development departments he would create a new development department focused around Miyamoto, who would later become one of the most recognized video game designers in the world. In 1983, the Nintendo Research & Development 4 (abbreviated to Nintendo R&D4) department was officially created, appointing Hiroshi Ikeda, former president of Toei Animation, as General Manager with Shigeru Miyamoto acting as chief producer. Nintendo also drafted a couple of key graphic designers to the department including Takashi Tezuka and Kenji Miki. With the arcade market dwindling, Nintendo R&D1's former focus, the department concentrated most of their software development resources on the emerging handheld video game console market, primarily thanks to the worldwide success of Nintendo's Game Boy. This catapulted the R&D4 department to become the lead software developer for Nintendo home video game consoles, developing a myriad of games for the Family Computer home console (abbreviated to Famicom, known as Nintendo Entertainment System in the North America, Europe and Australia).

Hiroshi Ikeda’s creative team had many video game design ideas, but was lacking the necessary programming power to make it all happen. Toshihiko Nakago and his small company Systems Research & Development (abbreviated to SRD) had its expertise in computer-aided design (CAD) tools and was very familiar with the Famicom chipset, and was originally hired to work with Masayuki Uemura’s Nintendo R&D2 to internally develop software development kits. When Nintendo R&D2 and SRD jointly began porting over R&D1 arcade games to the Famicom, Shigeru Miyamoto took the opportunity to lure Nakago away from R&D2, to help Miyamoto create his first Nintendo R&D4 video game, Excitebike. And so the original R&D4 department became comprised of Shigeru Miyamoto, Takashi Tezuka, Kenji Miki, and Minoru Maeda handling design; Koji Kondo, Akito Nakatsuka, and Hirokazu Tanaka handling sound and music; and Toshihiko Nakago and SRD became the technology and programming core.

One of the first games developed by the R&D4 department was Mario Bros., produced and directed by Miyamoto. The department was, however, unable to program the game with such an inexperienced team, and so counted with programming assistance from Gunpei Yokoi and the R&D1 department. One of the first completely self-developed games was Super Mario Bros., the sequel to Mario Bros. The game set standards to the platform genre and went on to be both a critical and commercial success. In 1986 R&D4 developed, among others, The Legend of Zelda for which Miyamoto again served as a director. The phenomenal sales of Super Mario Bros. and The Legend of Zelda fueled the expansion of the department with young game designers such as Hideki Konno, Katsuya Eguchi, Kensuke Tanabe, Takao Shimizu, who would later become producers themselves, as well as several other designers.

1990-2002: Renamed to Entertainment Analysis & Development[edit]

In 1989, during the Super Nintendo Entertainment System era, the Nintendo R&D4 department expanded and was renamed Nintendo Entertainment Analysis & Development (abbreviated to Nintendo EAD). The department spun-off its development duties in to two groups: the Software Development Group, which focused on video game development and was lead by Shigeru Miyamoto; and Technology Development Group, which focused on programming and developing tools and was lead by Takao Sawano. The technology group was born out of several R&D2 engineers that were assisting SRD with software libraries. The group later helped Argonaut Games develop the Super FX chip technology for the Super Nintendo Entertainment System, first used in Star Fox. This venture allowed the Technology Development Department to become more prominent in the 3D era, where they programmed and co-programmed several of Nintendo EAD’s 3D games with SRD.

In 1997, Miyamoto explained that about twenty to thirty employees were devoted to each Nintendo EAD title during the course of its development.[4] It was then that he also disclosed the existence of the SRD programming company within the division, formally Nintendo R&D2's software unit, which was composed of about 200 employees with proficiency in software programming.[4]

In 2002, Nintendo opened a Nintendo EAD studio in Tokyo, appointing Takao Shimizu as manager of the branch. The studio was created with the goal of bringing in fresh new talent from the capital of Japan who wouldn't be willing to travel hundreds of miles away to Kyoto. Their first project was to work on a new Donkey Kong Jungle Beat for the GameCube which made use of the DK Bongos, initially created for Donkey Konga.

2003-present: Restructure and new managers[edit]

The exterior of the Nintendo Central Office in Kyoto, Japan. Until 2014, it housed the Nintendo EAD Kyoto branch.

On September 30, 2003, as a result of a corporate restructure Nintendo was undergoing, in which several members of the Nintendo R&D1 and R&D2 were reassigned under Nintendo EAD, the department was consolidated into a division and began welcoming a new class of managers and producers.[5] Hideki Konno, Katsuya Eguchi, Eiji Aonuma, Hiroyuki Kimura, and Tadashi Sugiyama were appointed project managers of their own groups within the Kyoto Software Development Department; Takao Shimizu was appointed project manager of the Tokyo Software Development Department; and Keizo Ota and Yasunari Nishida were appointed project managers of their own groups in the Technology Development Department.

In 2013, Katsuya Eguchi was promoted Department Manager of both Software Development Departments in Kyoto and Tokyo. As such, he abandoned his role as Group Manager of the Kyoto Software Development Group No. 2 and was replaced by Hisashi Nogami.

On June 18, 2014, the EAD Kyoto branch was moved from the Nintendo Central Office (Nintendo's corporate headquarters) to the new Nintendo Development Center in Kyoto, Japan. The building is seven floors high and has a one floor basement, and currently houses more than 1100 developers from all of Nintendo's internal research and development divisions, which include the Nintendo EAD, SPD, IRD and SDD divisions.

Chronology[edit]

  • 1983 - The creative department was created and named Nintendo Research & Development 4, and Shigeru Miyamoto was assigned manager and producer.
  • 1989 - The department was renamed to Nintendo Entertainment Analysis & Development.
  • 2002 - The Nintendo EAD Tokyo branch was created.
  • 2004 - The department was consolidated into a division and several development groups were created, each with its own manager.
  • 2007 - A second development group in the EAD Tokyo branch was created, assigning Yoshiaki Koizumi as Group Manager.
  • 2013 - Katsuya Eguchi was promoted Department Manager of both Software Development Departments.
  • 2014 - The EAD Kyoto branch was moved from the Nintendo Central Office to the Nintendo Development Center.

Structural hierarchy[edit]

The General Manager of the Nintendo Entertainment Analysis & Development Division is Shigeru Miyamoto, assisted by both Keizo Kato, the Assistant Manager and Takashi Tezuka, the Executive Officer. The division is split into three different departments: the Kyoto Software Development Department, which is split into five separate groups, and the Tokyo Software Development Department, which is split into two separate groups, both supervised by Deputy Manager Katsuya Eguchi; and the Technology Development Department which is split into two separate teams in Kyoto, supervised by Deputy Manager Takao Sawano. All of these groups work concurrently on different projects.[6] Collectively these officers are responsible for green lighting software titles and hardware peripherals, managing prototypes, allocating development resources, and managing budgets.

Below is a schematic overview of the internal structure of the Nintendo EAD division after the restructuring process made on September 30, 2003.


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Entertainment Analysis & Development Division
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Comprehensive Development Group
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Technology Development Department
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Kyoto Software Development Department
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
TDG
 
DEG
 
SRD Co., Ltd
 
 
 
Tokyo Software Development Department
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
SDG No. 1
 
SDG No. 2
 
SDG No. 3
 
SDG No. 4
 
SDG No. 5
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
SDG No. 1
 
SDG No. 2
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Technical Support Group
 
 
 
 
Sound Production Group
 
 
 
 

Comprehensive Development Group[edit]

Group Manager: Shigeru Miyamoto, Takashi Tezuka

The Nintendo EAD Comprehensive Development Group is the managerial group that Shigeru Miyamoto and Takashi Tezuka, two Nintendo veteran developers, manage. The group is primarily focused on managing staffs, budgets, concepts and prototypes throughout all of Nintendo EAD. The group is rarely involved with the primary development of a game, but it has done so from time to time, such as in 2004 with Super Mario 64 DS for the Nintendo DS, and most recently for the Wii U with Star Fox and other projects.

List of software developed by Nintendo EAD Comprehensive Development Group
Title Genre(s) Platform(s) Year Producer(s) Director(s) Composer(s)
Stage Debut GameCube Cancelled Shigeru Miyamoto Takao Sawano Unknown
Pokémon Box: Ruby and Sapphire Pokémon manager GameCube 2003 Shigeru Miyamoto
Kenji Miki
Hiroaki Tsuru
Tatsuya Hishida
Kenta Usui
Junichi Masuda
Kenta Nagata
Toru Asakawa
Mario Kart: Double Dash! Racing GameCube 2003 Shigeru Miyamoto Kiyoshi Mizuki Shinobu Tanaka
Kenta Nagata
Pacman Vs. Maze GameCube 2003 Shigeru Miyamoto
Super Mario 64 DS Platform Nintendo DS 2004 Shigeru Miyamoto Shinichi Ikematsu Koji Kondo
Kenta Nagata
Project Giant Robot (tentative title) Vehicle simulation, fighting Wii U 2015 Shigeru Miyamoto Unknown Unknown
Project Guard (tentative title) Real-time strategy Wii U 2015 Shigeru Miyamoto Yugo Hayashi Unknown
Star Fox[7] (tentative title)[note 1] Shoot 'em up Wii U 2015 Shigeru Miyamoto Unknown Unknown
Notes
  1. ^ Nintendo is currently looking for a development partner for Star Fox.[7]

Project leaders[edit]

Kyoto Software Development Department[edit]

Katsuya Eguchi, Deputy Manager of the Nintendo EAD division.

Deputy Manager: Katsuya Eguchi

The Nintendo EAD Kyoto Software Development Department is the largest and also one of the oldest research and development departments within Nintendo, housing more than 700 video game developers. It is located in Kyoto, Japan, formerly in the Nintendo Central Office, but on June 28, 2014 it was relocated to the new Nintendo Development Center, which houses all of Nintendo's internal research and development divisions.

The development department consists of five different groups: the Software Development Group No. 1, which is managed by Hideki Konno and responsible for developing and maintaining the Nintendogs series and Mario Kart series; the Software Development Group No. 2, which is managed by Hisashi Nogami and responsible for developing most Wii series and maintaining the Animal Crossing series; the Software Development Group No. 3, which is managed by Eiji Aonuma and responsible for developing and maintaining The Legend of Zelda series; the Software Development Group No. 4, which is managed by Hiroyuki Kimura and responsible for developing and maintaining the Big Brain Academy series, the New Super Mario Bros. series and the Pikmin series; and the Software Development Group No. 5, which is managed by Tadashi Sugiyama and responsible for developing and maintaining the Wii Fit series and co-producing the Steel Diver series.

As of 2013, the department is managed by Nintendo veteran game developer Katsuya Eguchi, which also oversees development operations in the Tokyo Software Development Department. As such, he abandoned his role as Group Manager of the Kyoto Software Development Group No. 2 and was replaced by Hisashi Nogami.

Software Development Group No. 1[edit]

Group Manager: Hideki Konno

The group is primarily responsible for developing titles from the Nintendogs series and Mario Kart series.

List of software developed by Nintendo EAD Software Development Group No. 1
Title Genre(s) Platform(s) Year Producer(s) Director(s) Composer(s)
Nintendogs Simulation, digital pet Nintendo DS 2005 Hideki Konno Kiyoshi Mizuki Hajime Wakai
Mario Kart DS Racing Nintendo DS 2005 Hideki Konno Makoto Wada
Yasuyuki Oyagi
Shinobu Tanaka
Mario Kart Wii Racing Wii 2008 Hideki Konno Yasuyuki Oyagi Asuka Ohta
Ryo Nagamatsu
Nintendo DSi Sound Audio player Nintendo DSi 2008 Hideki Konno Yusuke Akifusa N/A
Nintendogs + Cats[8] Simulation, digital pet Nintendo 3DS 2011 Hideki Konno Yasuyuki Oyagi Asuka Hayazaki
Mario Kart 7[co-developed 1] Racing Nintendo 3DS 2011 Hideki Konno Kosuke Yabuki Kenta Nagata
Satomi Terui
Mario Kart 8 Racing Wii U 2014 Hideki Konno Kosuke Yabuki Shiho Fujii
Atsuko Asahi
Ryo Nagamatsu
Yasuaki Iwata
Notes
  1. ^ Co-developed with Retro Studios.

Software Development Group No. 2[edit]

Group Manager: Hisashi Nogami

The group is primarily responsible for developing most Wii series games and titles from the Animal Crossing series. In 2013, Hisashi Nogami became the Group Manager, effectively taking Katsuya Eguchi's place as he was promoted to Department Manager.[citation needed]

List of software developed by Nintendo EAD Software Development Group No. 2
Title Genre(s) Platform(s) Year Producer(s) Director(s) Composer(s)
Animal Crossing: Wild World Social simulation Nintendo DS 2005 Katsuya Eguchi Hisashi Nogami Kazumi Totaka
Asuka Ohta
Star Fox Command[co-developed 1] Scrolling shooter Nintendo DS 2006 Takaya Imamura
(supervised by Katsuya Eguchi)
Dylan Cuthbert Hajime Wakai
Wii Sports Sports Wii 2006 Katsuya Eguchi Keizo Ohta
Takayuki Shimamura
Yoshikazu Yamashita
Kazumi Totaka
Wii Play Party Wii 2006 Katsuya Eguchi Motoi Okamoto Shinobu Tanaka
Ryo Nagamatsu
Wii Music Music Wii 2008 Takashi Tezuka
Katsuya Eguchi
Kazumi Totaka Kenta Nagata
Toru Minegishi
Mahito Yokota
Animal Crossing: City Folk Social simulation Wii 2008 Katsuya Eguchi Hisashi Nogami Manaka Tominaga
Shiho Fujii
Wii Sports Resort Sports Wii 2009 Katsuya Eguchi Takayuki Shimamura
Yoshikazu Yamashita
Ryo Nagamatsu
Animal Crossing: New Leaf[co-developed 2] Social simulation Nintendo 3DS 2012 Katsuya Eguchi Isao Moro
Aya Kyogoku
Manaka Kataoka
Atsuko Asahi
WaraWara Plaza Operating system (Miiverse) Wii U 2012 Katsuya Eguchi
Kiyoshi Mizuki
Kouichi Kawamoto
Hisashi Nogami Toru Minegishi
Nintendo Land Party Wii U 2012 Katsuya Eguchi Takayuki Shimamura
Yoshikazu Yamashita
Ryo Nagamatsu
Animal Crossing Plaza Application (Miiverse) Wii U 2013 Hisashi Nogami Unknown Unknown
Wii Sports Club[co-developed 3] Sports Wii U 2013 Katsuya Eguchi Takayuki Shimamura Kazumi Totaka
Splatoon Third-person shooter Wii U 2015 Hisashi Nogami Yusuke Amano
Tsubasa Sakaguchi
Unknown
Notes
  1. ^ Development co-operation for Q-Games.
  2. ^ Development assistance by Monolith Soft.
  3. ^ Co-developed by Namco Bandai Studios.

Software Development Group No. 3[edit]

Group Manager: Eiji Aonuma

The group is responsible for developing titles from The Legend of Zelda series.

List of software developed by Nintendo EAD Software Development Group No. 3
Title Genre(s) Platform(s) Year Producer(s) Director(s) Composer(s)
The Legend of Zelda: Collector's Edition[co-developed 1] Action-adventure GameCube 2003 Shigeru Miyamoto
Takashi Tezuka
Eiji Aonuma
N/A Kenta Nagata
The Legend of Zelda: Four Swords Adventures Action-adventure GameCube 2004 Shigeru Miyamoto
Eiji Aonuma
Toshiaki Suzuki Koji Kondo
Asuka Ohta
The Legend of Zelda: Tetra's Trackers[9] Action-adventure GameCube Cancelled Eiji Aonuma Yoshinori Tsuchiyama Yuichi Ozaki
The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess Action-adventure GameCube
Wii
2006 Shigeru Miyamoto Eiji Aonuma Toru Minegishi
Asuka Ohta
The Legend of Zelda: Phantom Hourglass Action-adventure Nintendo DS 2007 Eiji Aonuma Daiki Iwamoto Kenta Nagata
Toru Minegishi
Link's Crossbow Training First-person shooter Wii 2007 Eiji Aonuma Makoto Miyanaga Kenta Nagata
The Legend of Zelda: Spirit Tracks Action-adventure Nintendo DS 2009 Eiji Aonuma Daiki Iwamoto Toru Minegishi
Asuka Ohta
Manaka Tominaga
The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword[co-developed 2] Action-adventure Wii 2011 Eiji Aonuma Hidemaro Fujibayashi Hajime Wakai
Shiho Fujii
Mahito Yokota
Takeshi Hama
The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker HD Action-adventure Wii U 2013 Eiji Aonuma Daiki Iwamoto Kenta Nagata
Asuka Hayazaki
The Legend of Zelda: A Link Between Worlds[co-developed 2] Action-adventure Nintendo 3DS 2013 Eiji Aonuma Hiromasa Shikata Ryo Nagamatsu
The Legend of Zelda (tentative title) Action-adventure, open world Wii U 2015 Eiji Aonuma Unknown Unknown
Notes
  1. ^ Co-developed by Nintendo Software Technology.
  2. ^ a b Development assistance by Monolith Soft.

Software Development Group No. 4[edit]

Group Manager: Hiroyuki Kimura

The group is primarily responsible for developing titles from the Big Brain Academy series, the New Super Mario Bros. series and the Pikmin series.

List of software developed by Nintendo EAD Software Development Group No. 4
Title Genre(s) Platform(s) Year Producer(s) Director(s) Composer(s)
Yoshi Touch & Go Platform, puzzle Nintendo DS 2005 Takashi Tezuka Hiroyuki Kimura Toru Minegishi
Asuka Ohta
Kazumi Totaka
Big Brain Academy Puzzle, educational Nintendo DS 2005 Hiroyuki Kimura Tomoaki Yoshinobu Kenta Nagata
New Super Mario Bros. Platform Nintendo DS 2006 Hiroyuki Kimura Shigeyuki Asuke Asuka Ohta
Hajime Wakai
Koji Kondo
Big Brain Academy: Wii Degree[10] Puzzle, educational Wii 2007 Hiroyuki Kimura Tomoaki Yoshinobu Ryo Nagamatsu
New Play Control! Pikmin[11] Real-time strategy Wii 2008 Hiroyuki Kimura Shigefumi Hino Hajime Wakai
New Play Control! Pikmin 2[12] Real-time strategy Wii 2009 Hiroyuki Kimura Shigefumi Hino Hajime Wakai
New Super Mario Bros. Wii[co-developed 1][13] Platform Wii 2009 Takashi Tezuka
Hiroyuki Kimura
Shigeyuki Asuke Kenta Nagata
Shiho Fujii
Ryo Nagamatsu
New Super Mario Bros. 2[co-developed 1][14] Platform Nintendo 3DS 2012 Takashi Tezuka
Hiroyuki Kimura
Yusuke Amano Kenta Nagata
New Super Mario Bros. U[co-developed 1][15] Platform Wii U 2012 Takashi Tezuka
Hiroyuki Kimura
Masataka Takemoto Shiho Fujii
Mahito Yokota
New Super Luigi U[co-developed 1][16] Platform Wii U 2013 Takashi Tezuka
Hiroyuki Kimura
Masataka Takemoto Shiho Fujii
Mahito Yokota
Pikmin 3[co-developed 2][17] Real-time strategy Wii U 2013 Hiroyuki Kimura Shigefumi Hino
Yuki Kando
Asuka Hayazaki
Atsuko Asahi
Hajime Wakai
Mario Maker Wii U 2015 Takashi Tezuka
Hiroyuki Kimura
Yosuke Oshino
Notes
  1. ^ a b c d Co-programmed by Systems Research & Development (SRD).
  2. ^ Development assistance by Monolith Soft.

Software Development Group No. 5[edit]

Group Manager: Tadashi Sugiyama

The group is primarily responsible for developing title from the Wii Fit series and overseeing the Steel Diver series.

List of software developed by Nintendo EAD Software Development Group No. 5
Title Genre(s) Platform(s) Year Producer(s) Director(s) Composer(s)
Wii Fit[co-developed 1][18] Exergaming Wii 2007 Tadashi Sugiyama Hiroshi Matsunaga Toru Minegishi
Manaka Tominaga
Shiho Fujii
Wii Fit Plus[co-developed 1][19] Exergaming Wii 2009 Tadashi Sugiyama Hiroshi Matsunaga Asuka Ohta
Steel Diver[co-developed 2][20] Simulation Nintendo 3DS 2011 Tadashi Sugiyama Takaya Imamura Atsuko Asahi
Toru Minegishi
Star Fox 64 3D[co-developed 3] Shoot 'em up Nintendo 3DS 2011 Tadashi Sugiyama Dylan Cuthbert Satomi Terui
Wii Fit U[co-developed 4] Exergaming Wii U 2013 Tadashi Sugiyama
Chikako Yamakura
Hiroshi Matsunaga
Hirofumi Irie
Takayuki Kobara
Steel Diver: Sub Wars[co-developed 2][21] Simulation Nintendo 3DS 2014 Tadashi Sugiyama Takaya Imamura Kenta Nagata
Atsuko Asahi
Toru Minegishi
Notes
  1. ^ a b Co-programmed by Systems Research & Development (SRD).
  2. ^ a b Co-developed by Vitei.
  3. ^ Development co-operation for Q-Games.
  4. ^ Co-developed by Ganbarion.

Tokyo Software Development Department[edit]

The exterior of the Nintendo Tokyo Office in Tokyo, Japan, home of the Nintendo EAD Tokyo.

Deputy Manager: Katsuya Eguchi

The Nintendo EAD Tokyo Software Development Department was created in 2002 with the goal of bringing in fresh new talent from the capital of Japan who wouldn't be willing to travel hundreds of miles away to Kyoto. It is located in Tokyo, Japan, in the Nintendo Tokyo Office.

The development department consists of two different groups: the Software Development Group No. 1, which is managed by Takao Shimizu and responsible for developing Donkey Kong Jungle Beat, the original Super Mario Galaxy and maintaining the Nintendo DS Guide series of virtual guides, as well as co-producing The Legend of Zelda remakes with Grezzo; the Software Development Group No. 2, which was created in 2007 and is managed by Yoshiaki Koizumi, is responsible for developing an maintaining the Flipnote Studio series and the Super Mario 3D series.

As of 2014, the department is managed by Nintendo veteran game developer Katsuya Eguchi, which also oversees development operations in the Kyoto Software Development Department.

Software Development Group No. 1[edit]

Group Manager: Takao Shimizu

Responsible for developing titles from the Super Mario Galaxy series and overseeing The Legend of Zelda remakes.

List of software developed by Nintendo EAD Tokyo Software Development Group No. 1
Title Genre(s) Platform(s) Year Producer(s) Director(s) Composer(s)
Donkey Kong Jungle Beat Platform GameCube 2004 Takao Shimizu Yoshiaki Koizumi Mahito Yokota
Super Mario Galaxy Platform Wii 2007 Shigeru Miyamoto
Takao Shimizu
Yoshiaki Koizumi Mahito Yokota
Koji Kondo
Nintendo DS Guide: Ikspiari[co-developed 1] Tour guide Nintendo DS 2009 Takao Shimizu
Takao Sawano
N/A N/A
Nintendo DS Guide: Kyoto Municipal Museum of Art[co-developed 1] Tour guide Nintendo DS 2009 Takao Shimizu
Takao Sawano
N/A N/A
Nintendo DS Guide: Osaka Aquarium Kaiyukan[co-developed 1] Tour guide Nintendo DS 2009 Takao Shimizu
Takao Sawano
N/A N/A
Nintendo DS Guide: Make It Yourself![co-developed 1] Tour guide Nintendo DSi
(DSiWare)
2010 Takao Shimizu
Takao Sawano
N/A N/A
The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time 3D[co-developed 2] Action-adventure Nintendo 3DS 2011 Takao Shimizu
Eiji Aonuma
Koich Ishii (Grezzo)
Shun Moriya
Mikiharu Ooiwa
Hiroyuki Kuwata
Mahito Yokota
Takeshi Hama
The Legend of Zelda: Four Swords Anniversary Edition[co-developed 2] Action-adventure Nintendo DSi
(DSiWare)
2011 Takao Shimizu
Eiji Aonuma
Koich Ishii (Grezzo)
Hidetomo Saito Yoshitaka Fujita (Grezzo)
Photos with Mario Augmented reality Nintendo 3DS 2013 Takao Shimizu N/A N/A
Wii U Panorama View Panorama viewer Wii U 2013 Takao Shimizu N/A N/A
Nintendo 3DS Guide: Louvre[co-developed 3][co-developed 1] Tour guide Nintendo 3DS 2013 Takao Shimizu Unknown Unknown
Notes
  1. ^ a b c d e Co-developed by the Nintendo EAD Technology Development Department.
  2. ^ a b Co-developed by Grezzo.
  3. ^ Co-developed by indieszero.

Software Development Group No. 2[edit]

Group Manager: Yoshiaki Koizumi

Responsible for developing titles from the Flipnote Studio series and the Super Mario 3D series.

List of software developed by Nintendo EAD Tokyo Software Development Group No. 2
Title Genre(s) Platform(s) Year Producer(s) Director(s) Composer(s)
New Play Control: Donkey Kong Jungle Beat Platform Wii 2008 Yoshiaki Koizumi Futoshi Shirai Mahito Yokota
Flipnote Studio Animation Nintendo DSi
(DSiWare)
2008 Yoshiaki Koizumi Hideaki Shimizu N/A
Super Mario Galaxy 2 Platform Wii 2010 Yoshiaki Koizumi
Takashi Tezuka
Koichi Hayashida Mahito Yokota
Ryo Nagamatsu
Koji Kondo
Super Mario 3D Land Platform Nintendo 3DS 2011 Yoshiaki Koizumi Koichi Hayashida Asuka Hayazaki
Takeshi Hama
Mahito Yokota
Flipnote Studio 3D Animation Nintendo 3DS
(Nintendo eShop)
2013 Yoshiaki Koizumi Hideaki Shimizu
Yasuhiko Matsuzaki
N/A
Super Mario 3D World Platform Wii U 2013 Yoshiaki Koizumi Koichi Hayashida
Kenta Motokura
Mahito Yokota
Toru Minegishi
Yasuaki Iwata
Koji Kondo
NES Remix[co-developed 1] Compilation Wii U 2013 Yoshiaki Koizumi
Masanobu Suzui (Indieszero)
Koichi Hayashida
Hirotaka Watanabe (Indieszero)
Toshiyuki Sudo
NES Remix 2[co-developed 1] Compilation Wii U 2014 Yoshiaki Koizumi
Masanobu Suzui (Indieszero)
Koichi Hayashida
Hirotaka Watanabe (Indieszero)
Toshiyuki Sudo
Captain Toad: Treasure Tracker Platform, puzzle Wii U 2014 Yoshiaki Koizumi Unknown Unknown
Untitled Super Mario game[22] Platform Unknown Unknown Yoshiaki Koizumi Unknown Unknown
Notes
  1. ^ a b Co-developed by indieszero.

Technology Development Department[edit]

Deputy Manager: Takao Sawano

A separate department that provides prototype engines, tool programs, and library environments throughout the development of several EAD software projects. Programmers may also be dispensed to the EAD Software Development Departments for specific game projects. The technological forefront from Nintendo usually stems from the experimentation and research derived by this group of software engineers.

Technology Design Group[edit]

Group Manager: Keizo Ota

Responsible for developing Software Development Kits (SDK's) and their respective development tools for Nintendo home and handheld consoles.

List of products developed
  • GameEye (2003)
  • Shigureden Navi (2006)
  • Wii Fit Balance Board (2007)

Development Environment Group[edit]

Group Manager: Yasunari Nishida

List of game engines developed
Title Platform Released
Mario Artist: Polygon Studio 64DD 2000
Mario Artist: Talent Studio 64DD 2000
Super Mario 128 Demonstration GC 2000
Super Mario Sunshine GC 2002
Donkey Kong: Jungle Beat GC 2004
Super Mario Galaxy Wii 2007
Super Hint Guide Wii 2008
Wii Motion Plus Wii 2008
Jibun de Tsukuru Nintendo DS Guide DSiWare 2010
AR Games 3DS 2011

Systems Research & Development [edit]

President: Toshihiko Nakago; Deputy Manager: Kazuaki Morita

Systems Research & Development (officially abbreviated as SRD) is a Japanese company that specializes in software programming and the development of computer-aided design tools (CAD). Established in 1979, the company is based in Osaka. However, the Kyoto branch is housed inside Nintendo's headquarters, under the Technology Development Department in the Nintendo EAD division. The President of SRD is Toshihiko Nakago, one of the co-founders of the company, and the manager of the Kyoto branch is Kazuaki Morita, both veteran programmers of Nintendo games.

In 1982, the SRD began working with the Nintendo Research & Development 2 department, which at the time was responsible for hardware development. The company was responsible for programming ports of arcade games to the Nintendo Entertainment System (Family Computer in Japan). One of the first games the company was responsible for was Shigeru Miyamoto's Donkey Kong. It was then that Miyamoto became aware of the SRD's potential and instructed the comapny to work with him in Excitebike. While Miyamoto developed Excitebike in co--operation with Toshihiko Nakago and the rest of the SRD team, he worked simultaneously withTakashi Tezuka on Devil World, Nintendo R&D4's first game. The next project of the department was Super Mario Bros., which marked the first time that Miyamoto, Tezuka and Nakago worked together. SRD also co-programmed The Legend of Zelda. Since then, Miyamoto and his R&D4 team have worked very closely with SRD and Nakago.

The cooperation between SRD and R&D4, now Nintendo EAD, is still present today. SRD has been responsible, among other things, for the programming of the other Super Mario and The Legend of Zelda titles in co-operation with Software Development Group No. 4 and Software Development Group No. 3, respectively. Because of the longstanding cooperation Miyamoto, Tezuka and Nakago are considered the golden triangle.

Sound Group[edit]

Group Manager: Koji Kondo
The group is primarily responsible for creating music and sound effects for the various projects of Nintendo EAD and its many departments.

List of composers and sound designers:

Technical Support Group[edit]

Group Manager: Hironobu Kakui

Software developed[edit]

Reception[edit]

Most of their games have been above-average according to numerous review sites, like IGN and Metacritic. Some people (and critics) have also hailed Nintendo EAD to have some of the greatest video game designers ever.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "任天堂の新開発棟が始動 ゲーム機、ソフト生む拠点". http://www.kyoto-np.co.jp/ (in Japanese). Kyoto NP. Retrieved 22 June 2014. 
  2. ^ "Using the D-pad to Jump". Iwata Asks: Super Mario Bros. 25th Anniversary Vol. 5: Original Super Mario Developers. Nintendo. 1 February 2011. Retrieved 1 February 2011. 
  3. ^ "I'd Never Heard Of Pac-Man". Iwata Asks: New Super Mario Bros. Wii Vol. 2. Nintendo. 11 December 2009. Retrieved 1 February 2011. 
  4. ^ a b Takao Imamura, Shigeru Miyamoto (1997). Nintendo Power August, 1997 - Pak Watch E3 Report "The Game Masters". Nintendo. pp. 104–105. 
  5. ^ N-Sider. Nintendo Revolution FAQ
  6. ^ Cassidy, Kevin. NCL Team Structure work in progress. June 7, 2006. Retrieved October 26, 2007.
  7. ^ a b Totilo, Stephen. "We Played Shigeru Miyamoto's New Star Fox Game". http://kotaku.com/. Kotaku. Retrieved 10 July 2014. "Confusingly, though, [Shigeru Miyamoto] also said that Nintendo is seeking development partners on it, making it sound like the game is far, far from done." 
  8. ^ Nintendo EAD Group No. 1 (2011-02-26). Nintendogs + Cats. Nintendo 3DS. Nintendo. Scene: Staff credits. "Producer: Hideki Konno / Director: Yasuyuki Oyagi [...] Music Composition: Asuka Hayazaki" 
  9. ^ "Four Swords + 10 Answers". http://uk.ign.com/. IGN. Retrieved 1 July 2014. "While NOA has yet to announce the feature set of the US version of Four Swords, it's safe to assume that Tetra's Trackers, which was shown as a standalone title at E3, is no longer slated for release." 
  10. ^ Nintendo EAD Group No. 4 (2007-04-26). Big Brain Academy: Wii Degree. Wii. Nintendo. Scene: Staff credits. "Producer: Hiroyuki Kimura / Director: Tomoaki Yoshinobu [...] Music Composition: Ryo Nagamatsu" 
  11. ^ Nintendo EAD Group No. 4 (2008-12-25). New Play Control! Pikmin. Wii. Nintendo. Scene: Staff credits. "Producer: Hiroyuki Kimura / Director: Shigefumi Hino [...] Music Composition: Hajime Wakai" 
  12. ^ Nintendo EAD Group No. 4 (2008-12-25). New Play Control! Pikmin 2. Wii. Nintendo. Scene: Staff credits. "Producer: Hiroyuki Kimura / Director: Shigefumi Hino [...] Music Composition: Hajime Wakai" 
  13. ^ Nintendo EAD Group No. 4 (2009-11-11). New Super Mario Bros. Wii. Wii. Nintendo. Scene: Staff credits. "Producer: Takashi Tezuka, Hiroyuki Kimura (Nintendo) / Director: Shigeyuki Asuke (Nintendo) [...] Program Director: Makoto Sasaki (SRD) [...] Music Composition: Shiho Fujii, Ryo Nagamatsu (Nintendo)" 
  14. ^ Nintendo EAD Group No. 4 (2012-07-28). New Super Mario Bros. 2. Nintendo 3DS. Nintendo. Scene: Staff credits. "Producer: Takashi Tezuka, Hiroyuki Kimura (Nintendo) / Director: Yusuke Amano (Nintendo) [...] Program Director: Kenji Higashiyama (SRD) [...] Sound Director: Kenta Nagata (Nintendo)" 
  15. ^ Nintendo EAD Group No. 4 (2012-11-18). New Super Mario Bros. U. Wii U. Nintendo. Scene: Staff credits. "Producer: Takashi Tezuka, Hiroyuki Kimura (Nintendo) / Director: Masataka Takemoto (Nintendo) [...] Player Program: Keigo Nakanishi (SRD) [...] Music Composition: Shiho Fujii, Mahito Yokota (Nintendo)" 
  16. ^ Nintendo EAD Group No. 4 (2013-06-19). New Super Luigi U. Wii U. Nintendo. Scene: Staff credits. "Producer: Takashi Tezuka, Hiroyuki Kimura (Nintendo) / Director: Masataka Takemoto (Nintendo) [...] Player Program: Keigo Nakanishi (SRD) [...] Music Composition: Shiho Fujii, Mahito Yokota (Nintendo)" 
  17. ^ Nintendo EAD Group No. 4 (2013-07-13). Pikmin 3. Wii U. Nintendo. Scene: Staff credits. "Producer: Hiroyuki Kimura (Nintendo) / Director: Shigefumi Hino, Yuji Kando (Nintendo) [...] Music Composition: Asuka Hayazaki, Atsuko Asahi, Hajime Wakai (Nintendo) [...] Monolith Soft Inc." 
  18. ^ Nintendo EAD Group No. 5 (2007-12-01). Wii Fit. Wii. Nintendo. Scene: Staff credits. "Producer: Tadashi Sugiyama (Nintendo) / Director: Hiroshi Matsunaga (Nintendo) / Hardware Producer: Takao Sawano / Hardware Director: Takeshi Nagareda [...] Main Program: Shigehiro Kasamatsu (SRD) [...] Music Composition: Toru Minegishi, Manaka Tominaga, Shiho-Fujii (Nintendo)" 
  19. ^ Nintendo EAD Group No. 5 (2009-10-01). Wii Fit Plus. Wii. Nintendo. Scene: Staff credits. "Producer: Tadashi Sugiyama (Nintendo) / Director: Hiroshi Matsunaga (Nintendo) [...] Program Chief: Nobuhiro Sumiyoshi (SRD) [...] Music Composition: Asuka Ohta (Nintendo)" 
  20. ^ Vitei, Nintendo EAD Group No. 5 (2011-05-12). Steel Diver. Nintendo 3DS. Nintendo. Scene: Staff credits. "Producer: Tadashi Sugiyama (Nintendo) / Director: Takaya Imamura (Nintendo) [...] Design Director: Takao Kurebayashi (Vitei) [...] Music Composition: Atsuko Asahi, Toru Minegishi (Nintendo)" 
  21. ^ Vitei, Nintendo EAD Group No. 5 (2014-02-13). Steel Diver: Sub Wars. Nintendo 3DS. Nintendo. Scene: Staff credits. "Producer: Tadashi Sugiyama (Nintendo) / Director: Takaya Imamura (Nintendo) [...] Design Director: Takao Kurebayashi (Vitei) [...] Music Composition: Kenta Nagata, Atsuko Asahi, Toru Minegishi (Nintendo)" 
  22. ^ Makuch, Eddie. "Nintendo confirms work has begun on the next core Mario game, but won't say if it's for Wii U or 3DS". http://www.gamespot.com/. GameSpot. Retrieved 9 July 2014.