Nintendo World Cup

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Nekketsu High School Dodgeball Club: Soccer
Nintendo World Cup
Nintendo World Cup Cover.jpg
North American Cover art
Developer(s) Technōs Japan
SPS (X68000)
Publisher(s)
Designer(s) Noriyuki Tomiyama, Hiroyuki Sekimoto, Mitsuhiro Yoshida
Composer(s) Kazuo Sawa
Platform(s) Family Computer/NES, X68000, Wii (Virtual Console)
Release date(s) Family Computer/NES
  • JP May 18, 1990
  • NA December 1990
  • EU June 27, 1991
X68000 Virtual Console
  • JP October 7, 2008 (Wii)
  • JP March 19, 2014 (Wii U)
Genre(s) Sports
Mode(s) Tournament (1–2 players against CPU), VS Match (2–4 players)
Distribution 2-megabit cartridge

Nintendo World Cup is a soccer video game for the Family Computer/NES and Game Boy, developed by Technōs Japan and released in 1990. It is a localization of Nekketsu High School Dodgeball Club: Soccer (熱血高校ドッジボール部サッカー編 Nekketsu Kōkō Dojjibōru Bu: Sakkā Hen?, lit. "Hot Blooded High School Dodge Ball Club: Soccer Edition"), the fourth Kunio-kun game released for the Family Computer. Ports for the PC Engine and Mega Drive were also released in Japan. A Game Boy version was released in Japan, North America and Europe.

Plot[edit]

Nekketsu High School Dodgeball Club: Soccer[edit]

Thirteen students known as Atsushi, Genei, Hiroyuki, Kunio, Masa, Masahiro, Susumu and Takashi compete in a soccer tournament against thirteeen other high schools.

Nintendo World Cup[edit]

Thirteen national teams compete in a world cup to become number 1.

Gameplay[edit]

Gameplay of Nintendo World Cup. The player-controlled U.S.A. team competes against Japan, led by Kunio.

At its core, the game follows the rules of soccer, but with noticeable differences. Each team has only six players (a goalkeeper, two defenders, a midfielder and two forwards). You control only one of them, but you can give commands (Pass/Shoot) to the others. Offsides are non-existent and fouls are not punished. Players can be knocked out by repeatedly sliding, tackling or shooting them, afterwards they will stay down for the rest of the half. Players can also use up to five "super shots" per half; these powerful, odd-looking shots are used whenever a player does a bicycle kick or a diving header,[1] or when he shoots after walking a certain number of steps.[2] The "super shots" differ from team to team. The playing fields also differ in respect to material, e.g. ice, which heavily impacts movement of both, players and the ball.

There are two game modes:[3]

  • Tournament mode, in which one or two players take control of one of the 13 available teams, in order to defeat their CPU-controlled opponents.
  • VS Match mode, which enables players to confront each other on sand, ice or dirt playing fields.[4] On the NES version, up to four players can compete using the NES Four Score[5] or the NES Satellite. For the Game Boy a link cable or Four Player Adapter would be used.

Graphically, the NES version game looks similar to the Famicom version and other games in the Kunio-kun series, particularly Downtown Nekketsu Story/River City Ransom, with its short-legged, big-headed characters with varied faces; in fact, some sprites, such as Kunio and the other members of the Japanese team, were reused from that game.

World Cup Teams[edit]

The national teams in Nintendo World Cup are as follows:

Some of the teams had naming issues:

  • The Soviet Union is denominated as Russia in the NES port of the game, but as U.S.S.R. in the Game Boy port
  • West Germany is denominated as W. Germany in the NES port, but as Germany in the Game Boy port
  • The Netherlands appears in both versions under the name Holland.The term Holland is frequently used as a pars pro toto to refer to the whole of the Netherlands, but this usage is disliked by part of the Dutch population, especially in the other parts of the Netherlands.[6]

Regional differences[edit]

The NES version of Nekketsu High School Dodge Ball Club: Soccer Edition, Nintendo World Cup, differs from its counterpart, in which instead of a soccer tournament set in Japan between thirteen high schools, the game centers around a World Cup. In the main Tournament Mode, the player takes control of the main team of Nekketsu High School team and competes against the twelve other teams. The Tournament Mode's opening intro and story sequences are removed in the NES version. In the Famicom version's "Vs. Match Mode", the player can only choose between the Nekketsu team and four other teams. Since the main Tournament Mode in the Famicom version only featured a single team, the NES localization allows the player to choose between the thirteen nationalities represented in the game by changing the palette of the player's team and their super shots. However, unlike the Famicom version, the NES version supports up to four players instead of two.

Ports[edit]

Game Boy[edit]

A port to the Game Boy was released as Nekketsu High School Soccer Club: World Cup (熱血高校サッカー部 ワールドカップ編 Nekketsu Kōkō Sakkā Bu: Wārudo Kappu Hen?, lit. "Hot Blooded High School Soccer Club: World Cup Edition") in Japan and was based on Nintendo World Cup. It was released in North America and Europe under the same name.

Players[edit]

  •  Argentina: Arturo, Diego, Fan, Hector, Jose, Jules, Nery, Oscar.
  •  Brazil: Alam, Bruno, Costa, Ellio, Janio, Joao, Silva, Thao.
  •  Cameroon: Akbar, Axson, Bwogi, Dabi, Kwame, Mwai, Taha, Yemi.
  •  England: Ardrew, Arthur, George, Henry, Jomes, Keith, Paul, Peter.
  •  France: Andre, Jan, Joel, Leon, Manuel, Michel, Pierru, Rone.
  •  Italy: Aldo, Andrea, Emilio, Enrico, Enzo, Giulio, Mauro, Petro.
  •  Japan: Genei, Kenji, Koji, Kunio, Makoto, Masao, Riki, Susumu.
  •  Mexico: Addfo, Chico, Jolio, Luis, Mavo, Miko, Niro, Rene.
  •  Netherlands: Jelle, Johan, Louis, Niels, Piet, Stefar, Victor, Willem.
  •  Soviet Union: Boris, Illia, Lvan, Pavel, Pyotr, Vagis, Volf, Yakov.
  •  Spain: Carlos, Frnco, Juan, Juan, Marco, Pablo, Toni, Tonto.
  •  United States: Brian, Chris, Dayv, Don, Fred, Mark, Phil, Tony.
  •  West Germany: Andi, Friesl, Hans, Jurgen, Lothar, Olaf, Rudi, Thomas.

PC Engine CD[edit]

The game was ported to PC Engine's Super CD-ROM² and retitled Nekketsu High School Dodgeball Club: CD Soccer (熱血高校ドッジボール部 CDサッカー編 Nekketsu Kōkō Dodgeball Bu: Shī Dī Sakkā Hen?, lit. "Hot Blooded High School Dodge Ball Club: CD Soccer Edition") and was released in December 20, 1991, was published by Naxat Soft.

This version includes five national teams (France, Brazil, Argentina, Italy and Germany) in Tournament mode which is after beating the final match.

PC Engine[edit]

A similar version for the PC Engine HuCard was released on April 13, 1992 under the title Nekketsu High School Dodgeball Club: PC Soccer (熱血高校ドッジボール部 PCサッカー編 Nekketsu Kōkō Dojjibōru Bu: Pī Shī Sakkā-hen?, lit. "Hot Blooded High School Dodge Ball Club: PC Soccer Edition"). Only differences between the two versions, the CD version has an arranged soundtrack and add voice acting for opening intro and cut scene, while the HuCard version has no voice acting, etc.

Mega Drive[edit]

A Mega Drive version of the game, titled Nekketsu High School Dodgeball Club: MD Soccer (熱血高校ドッジボール部 MDサッカー編 Nekketsu Kōkō Dojjibōru Bu: Mega Doraibu Sakkā-hen?, lit. "Hot Blooded High School Dodge Ball Club: MD Soccer Edition") was released by Palsoft in Japan on August 7, 1992. Unlike the Famicom/NES version and other Platforms, this version has all the teams playable in VS. Mode.

Game Boy Advance[edit]

The Famicom version of the game was ported to Game Boy Advance as the part of Kunio-kun Nekketsu Collection 2 (along with Downtown Nekketsu Kōshinkyoku: Soreyuke Daiundōkai), was released on October 27, 2005 in Japan.

Virtual Console[edit]

The original Famicom version of Nekketsu High School Dodgeball Club: Soccer Edition was re-released for Virtual Console in Japan on October 7, 2008 for the Wii and on March 19, 2014 for the Wii U. Nintendo World Cup, however, there is no plans for North America or PAL regions released. The PC Engine Super CD-ROM² version of the game was also re-released in Japan for the Wii on November 4, 2008.

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Instruction booklet, p. 6
  2. ^ Instruction booklet, p. 14
  3. ^ Instruction booklet, pp. 7–8
  4. ^ Instruction booklet, p.17
  5. ^ Instruction booklet, p.17
  6. ^ "Holland or the Netherlands? | Netherlands Embassy in Stockholm, Sweden". Sweden.nlembassy.org. Retrieved 2013-06-15.