Nipponites

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Nipponites
Temporal range: Turonian–Santonian[1]
Nipponites.jpg
Fossils of Nipponites mirabilis from an exhibit at the National Museum of Nature and Science, Tokyo, Japan
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Mollusca
Class: Cephalopoda
Subclass: Ammonoidea
Order: Ammonitida
Suborder: Ancyloceratina
Superfamily: Turrilitaceae
Family: Nostoceratidae
Genus: Nipponites
Yabe, 1904
Species
  • N. mirabilis Yabe, 1904 (type species)
  • N. bacchus Matsumoto and Muramoto, 1967
  • N. occidentalis
  • N. sachalinensis

Nipponites ("stone of Nippon") is an extinct genus of heteromorph ammonites. The species of Nipponites (primarily N. mirabilis) are famous for the way their shells form "ox-bow" bends, resulting in some of the most bizarre shapes ever seen among ammonites.

The ecology of Nipponites, as with many other nostoceratids, is subject to much speculation.

Distribution[edit]

Fossils of most species are found primarily in Upper Cretaceous-aged strata of Japan. N. mirabilis is found in Conician-aged strata of Japan and possibly Turonian-aged strata in Madagascar.[2] N. bacchus is found in Upper Cretaceous Hokkaido. Two species are found exclusively outside of Japan, N. sachalinensis, which is found in Upper Cretaceous strata of Sakhalin island, and Kamchatka peninsula,[3] and N. occidentalis, which is found exclusively in Turonian-aged strata of Southern Oregon.[4]

References[edit]

Notes
  1. ^ Sepkoski, Jack (2002). "Sepkoski's Online Genus Database". Retrieved 2014-05-28. 
  2. ^ Makhon ha-geʹologi (Israel) (1981). Geological Survey Current Research. Ministry of Commerce and Industry, Geological Survey of Israel. 
  3. ^ Shigeta, Yasunari, and Haruyoshi Maeda. "Yezo Group research in Sakhalin—a historical review." National Science Museum Monographs 31 (2005): 1-24.
  4. ^ Ward, Peter D., and Gerd EG Westermann. "First occurrence, systematics, and functional morphology of Nipponites (Cretaceous Lytoceratina) from the Americas." Journal of Paleontology (1977): 367-372.
Bibliography
  • Arkell, W.J.; Kummel, B.; Wright, C.W. (1957). Mesozoic Ammonoidea. Treatise on Invertebrate Paleontology, Part L, Mollusca 4. Lawrence, Kansas: Geological Society of America and University of Kansas Press.