Nissan 240SX

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Nissan 200SX/240SX
Nissan 240SX -- 03-16-2012.JPG
Overview
Manufacturer Nissan
Also called Nissan Silvia (coupe)
Nissan 180SX (Hatchback)
Nissan 200SX (in some parts of Europe)
Production 1989–1998
Assembly Kanda, Fukuoka, Japan,
(Kyūshū Plant)
Body and chassis
Class Sport compact
Layout FR layout
Platform Nissan S platform
Powertrain
Transmission 4-speed automatic
5-speed manual

The 240SX is a sports car that was introduced to the North American market by Nissan in 1988 for the following model year. It replaced the outgoing 200SX (S12) model. Most of the 240SX were equipped with the 2.4-liter inline 4 engine (KA24E from 1989–1990 and KA24DE from 1991–1998). The KA24E had a single over-head cam and KA24DE had dual over-head cams. Three distinct generations of the 240SX, the S13 (1989–1994) the S14 (1995-1998) and the s15 were produced based on the Nissan S platform. The SR20DET was never legalized or introduced into the North American market in a 240SX, though some like to import them along with the numerous RB platform motors from the Nissan Skyline as well as out of manufacturer platform motor swaps like the common 1JZ or 2JZ along with many American V8 power plant motor swaps

The 240SX is closely related to other S platform based vehicles, such as the Japanese-market Silvia and 180SX, and the European-market 200SX. Although their names are similar, the 240SX is unrelated to the 240Z or the 280ZX.

First generation / S13 (1989–1994)[edit]

First generation
(S13)
Red 240SX II.jpg
Overview
Production 1989–1994
Body and chassis
Body style 2-door coupe
3-door hatchback
2-door convertible
Powertrain
Engine 2.4 L KA24E I4
2.4 L KA24DE I4
Dimensions
Wheelbase 2,474 mm (97.4 in)
Length 4,521 mm (178.0 in)
Width 1,689 mm (66.5 in)
Height 1,290 mm (50.8 in)
Curb weight 1,224 kilograms (2,698 lb)

The first generation of the 240SX can be divided into two distinct versions, both having the sporting advantage of rear wheel drive standard. Each of these variants came in two distinct body styles: fastback, which was offered in both base and SE trim, and coupe, which was offered in base, LE and bivenlar race car platinum edition trim levels. Both styles shared the same front bodywofrk as the Japanese-market Nissan 180SX, featuring the sloping front with pop-up headlights. This bodywork distinguishes the coupe model from its Japanese-market counterpart, the Silvia, which featured fixed headlights. Both styles in all markets share the same chassis, and with few exceptions, most components and features are identical. The 240sx is a popular car in the sport of drifting due to its short wheelbase, low cost, ample power, and abundant aftermarket support.

1989 and 1990 models are powered by a naturally aspirated 140 horsepower (100 kW), 160 pound-feet (220 N·m) 2.4l SOHC KA24E engine with 3 valves per cylinder (instead of the turbo-charged and intercooled 1.8-liter DOHC CA18DET offered in Japan and Europe in the 180SX and Silvia). Four-wheel disc brakes were standard, with antilock brakes available as an option on the SE. Both models were offered with either a 4-speed automatic or 5-speed manual transmission. "Coupes" offered a Heads-up display (HUD) with a digital speedometer as part of the optional Power Convenience Group.

Nissan 240SX convertible

The 240SX received some updates in 1991. This gave the car an overhaul that included a minor update of the exterior and a new cylinder head. The front bumper was updated and a new "LE" hatchback trim package was added that included leather interior. The SOHC KA24E was replaced by the DOHC KA24DE, now with 4 valves per cylinder, rated at 155 horsepower (116 kW) and 160 pound-feet (220 N·m). An optional sports package including ABS, a limited slip differential, and Nissan's HICAS four wheel steering was now available on hatchback models. In 1992, a convertible was added to the lineup and was exclusive to the North American market. These vehicles began life in Japan as coupes and were later modified in the California facilities of American Specialty Cars (ASC).[1] For the 1994 model year, the only available 240SX was a Special Edition convertible equipped with an automatic transmission. The US 240sx convertible differed from the Japanese market version, in that the Japanese market model had a power top cover boot, whereas the US market model had manually installed boot cover once the top is down.

The S13 was known for sharp steering and handling (thanks to front MacPherson struts and a rear multilink suspension) and relatively light weight (2700 lb) but was regarded in the automotive press as being underpowered. The engine, while durable, was a heavy iron-block unit that produced meager power for its relatively large size. It was only modestly improved by the change to the DOHC version in 1991. These engines are the primary difference between the North American 240SX and the world-market Silvia/180SX/200SX. The KA24DE did not come turbocharged while the SR20DET did. Other differences include a standard limited slip differential on overseas and Canadian models, available digital climate control in Japan, and manual seat belts standard in Japan and Canada vs. automatic restraint seatbelts in America. The 240sx S13 model came standard with a dual tip exhaust system, as well as a single tip exhaust system.

Second generation / S14 (1995–1998)[edit]

Second generation
(S14)
S14zenki.jpg
Overview
Production 1995–1998
Body and chassis
Body style 2-door coupe
Powertrain
Engine 2.4 L KA24DE I4
Dimensions
Wheelbase 2,525 mm (99.4 in)
Length 4,498 mm (177.1 in)
Width 1,727 mm (68.0 in)
Height 1,288 mm (50.7 in)
Curb weight 1,253 kg (2,762.4 lb)

The 240SX was redesigned in the spring of 1994 as a 1995 model. The hatchback and convertible body styles were eliminated, leaving only the coupe. The wheelbase car grew 2 inches (51 mm) and the track width was also increased, while the overall length of the vehicle was slightly shorter than the previous generation. The curb weight of the vehicle increased by about 80 pounds relative to the 1994 model.[2] Dual air bags were added and the automatic seatbelts were replaced with common manual type. The pop-up headlights were removed in favor of fixed lamps. Though the general layout remained the same, almost all parts were redesigned to the extent that very few parts are interchangeable. The chassis was changed slightly to increase stiffness (Nissan claimed 50% torsional, 100% bending rigidity increase)[citation needed] and utilized higher rear strut mounts. The fuel tank, previously located at the rear end under the trunk floor, now sat in front of the rear suspension and behind the rear seats.


The base model had 4-lug, 15-inch wheels, a softer suspension, no rear sway bar, and no remote trunk opening option. Base model dealer options could have features added such as leather, ABS, & a viscous limited-slip differential. SE and LE models came equipped with 5-lug, 16-inch alloy wheels, a stiffer suspension than the base model, and a rear sway bar. The LE was basically an upgraded SE model, equipped with leather seats, keyless entry, an antitheft system, and a CD player. Antilock brakes and a viscous limited-slip differential could be had as an optional package to both base and SE/LE models.

S14 "Kouki"

In 1997, the 240SX received minor updates. The different looks of the S-Chassis are referred to as before change "Zenki" as seen on the right, and after change "Kouki" as seen on the left. Changes were primarily aesthetic, including new projector headlights, front bumper, hood, fenders, and revised taillights and center panel. Side skirts became standard on the SE and LE trim level. 1998 marked the end of production for the Nissan 240SX, with no further variations released in America. The later generation of the 240sx suffered in sales due to the competition from other car manufacturers. Every 240SX was built in Kyūshū, Japan. The last 240SX rolled off the assembly line on July 23, 1998.

Motorsports[edit]

Nissan 240SX in IMSA GT series

The 240SX was successfully raced in several motorsports including the IMSA GT series. The 240SX ran in the GTU class in the IMSA Camel GT series and won several manufacturer and driver championships.[citation needed] As the sport of drifting gains momentum and popularity in the United States the 240sx has become one of the most popular platforms thanks to its front-engine, rear-wheel drive set-up and large aftermarket support.

Production numbers In the United States[edit]

All models (including convertibles):

  • 1989 - 68118
  • 1990 - 60582
  • 1991 - 34534
  • 1992 - 27033
  • 1993 - 21471
  • 1994 - 1391
  • 1995 - 25114
  • 1996 - 7334
  • 1997 - 3655
  • 1998 - 2178

Total cars produced from 1989 to 1998: 251410[citation needed]

Convertibles only:

  • 1992 - 2327
  • 1993 - 4602
  • 1994 - 1391

Total convertibles produced from 1992 to 1994: 8320[citation needed]

Production numbers total those acquired by American Specialty Cars.

See also[edit]

References[edit]