No.101-class landing ship

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IJN landing ship No149 on test.jpg
No.149 on 2 March 1944 at Kurahashijima Island.
Class overview
Name: No.101-class landing ship
No.103-class landing ship
Builders: Sasebo Naval Arsenal
Hitachi Zōsen Corporation
Kawanami Kōgyō Corporation
Ōsaka Zōsen Corporation
Operators: Naval Ensign of Japan.svg Imperial Japanese Navy
War flag of the Imperial Japanese Army.svg Imperial Japanese Army
Flag of the Republic of China.svg Republic of China Navy
Soviet Navy Ensign Soviet Navy
Built: 1943–1945
In commission: 1944–1955
Planned: 103
Completed: 69 (Navy: 49, Army: 20)
Cancelled: 32
Lost: 41 (Navy: 40, Army: 1)
Retired: 30 (Navy: 9, Army: 19)
General characteristics No.101 class
Displacement: 950 long tons (965 t) standard
1,010 long tons (1,026 t) trial
Length: 80.50 m (264 ft 1 in) overall
75.50 m (247 ft 8 in) waterline
Beam: 9.10 m (29 ft 10 in)
Draught: 2.89 m (9 ft 6 in)
Draft: 5.65 m (18 ft 6 in)
Propulsion: 3 × intermediate diesels
3 shafts, 1,200 bhp
Speed: 13.4 knots (15.4 mph; 24.8 km/h)
Range: 3,000 nmi (5,600 km) at 13.4 kn (15.4 mph; 24.8 km/h)
Capacity:

320 troops, 26 tons freight and
Example 1: 13 × Type 95 Ha-Go
Example 2: 9 × Type 97 Chi-Ha
Example 3: 7 × Type 2 Ka-Mi
Example 4: 5 × Type 3 Ka-Chi

Example 5: 250 tons freight
Complement: 90
Armament: No.101, March 1944
• 1 × 76.2 mm (3.00 in) L/40 AA gun
• 6 × Type 96 25 mm AA guns
• 6 × depth charges
General characteristics No.103 class
Displacement: 870 long tons (884 t) standard
1,020 long tons (1,036 t) trial
Length: 80.50 m (264 ft 1 in) overall
75.00 m (246 ft 1 in) waterline
Beam: 9.10 m (29 ft 10 in)
Draught: 2.94 m (9 ft 8 in)
Draft: 5.65 m (18 ft 6 in)
Propulsion: 1 × Kampon geared turbine
2 × Kampon water tube boilers
single shaft, 2,500 shp
Speed: 16.0 knots (18.4 mph; 29.6 km/h)
Range: Going: 1,000 nmi (1,900 km) at 16 kn (30 km/h; 18 mph)
Returning: 1,000 nmi (1,900 km; 1,200 mi) at 14 kn (26 km/h; 16 mph)
Capacity:

120 troops, 22 tons freight and
Example 1: 13 × Type 95 Ha-Go
Example 2: 9 × Type 97 Chi-Ha
Example 3: 7 × Type 2 Ka-Mi
Example 4: 5 × Type 3 Ka-Chi
Example 5: 220 tons freight

Example 6: approx. 280 troops
Complement: 100
Armament: No.104, 20 August 1944
• 1 × 76.2 mm (3.00 in) L/40 AA gun
• 16 × Type 96 25 mm AA guns
• 4 × 13 mm AA guns
• 12 × depth charges

The No.101-class landing ships (第百一号型輸送艦, Dai 101 Gō-gata Yusōkan?) were a class of amphibious assault ships of the Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN) and Imperial Japanese Army (IJA), serving during and after World War II. The No.101 class was equipped with diesel engines, while the similar No.103-class landing ships (第百三号型輸送艦, Dai 103 Gō-gata Yusōkan?) were equipped with a turbine engine. The IJN called them 2nd class transporter (二等輸送艦, 2-Tō Yusōkan?). The No.103 class has the IJA's SB craft (SB艇, SB-tei?) [1] variant. This article handles them collectively.

Background[edit]

IJA SS craft No.19
  • In June 1943, after its defeat in the Guadalcanal Campaign, the IJN realized the necessity of a high-speed military transporter, and they devised two types of ship. One (the No.1 class) was the 1,500-ton mothership of the Daihatsu-class landing craft and Kō-hyōteki-class submarines, the other the 900-ton amphibious assault ship for beachhead (described in this article).
  • The IJA already had an amphibious assault ship, the SS-class landing ship. However, the SS craft were not suitable for mass-production for a structure elaborate very much. Therefore, the IJA wanted the new amphibious assault ships.
  • The plans of the IJN and the IJA were accorded. They cooperated for new amphibious assault ships. The IJN offered a design and shipyards while the IJA offered mineral resources.

Design[edit]

  • The IJN already obtained information regarding Operation Torch from Germany, including some photographs and sketches of the LCT Mk.V.
  • In August 1943, the Navy Technical Department (Kampon) studied these and finished a basic design. It was a scaled-up model of the LCT.
  • In September 1943, the Kampon entrusted the detailed design to the Kure Naval Arsenal. The Kure Naval Arsenal finished it within two months, and the No.101 was laid down in November 1943.

Construction[edit]

  • The Kampon designed a new turbine engine[2] for this class. However, it was not ready in time for the first 6 vessels. The Kampon put the wartime standard diesel engine on first 6 vessels. The IJN called them No.101 class or SB (D). For the all the others, turbine engines were supplied smoothly. The IJN called them No.103 class or SB (T). Completed vessels were split between the IJN and IJA.
  • The IJA received 32 vessels from No.103 class, however the IJA did not master handling of a turbine engine. The IJA returned 10 vessels[3] to the IJN. The completed vessels were sent one by one to the front.
  • About the No.103 class and SB craft, several vessels were changed the coal-fired boilers on January 1945. Detailed construction records were not left.[4]

Navy service[edit]

  • Most of the Navy vessels were sent to the Battle of Leyte, 18 of them were lost. Most of them, however, succeeded in the landing of tanks and troops.
  • Only 9 vessels survived the war.

Army service[edit]

  • As of 2009 a detailed record about the vessels in the Army service is not known to exist in Japan.
  • The armaments were not unified.
  • The IJA let ten SB craft participate in the Philippines Campaign. Their actions were limited to the Luzon northern coast, Taiwan and Ryukyu Islands. The IJA lost only one SB craft.
  • After the Philippines Campaign, the SB craft were used only in the Japanese mainland peripheral sea area.

Ships in classes[edit]

No.101 class[edit]

Ship Builder Laid down Launched Completed Fate
No.101 Ōsaka Zōsen 01-12-1943 25-01-1944 08-03-1944 Sunk by aircraft at Ormoc Bay, 28-10-1944.
No.102 Ōsaka Zōsen 15-12-1843 08-02-1944 15-03-1944 Sunk by aircraft at west of Negros, 26-10-1944.
No.127 Kawanami Kōgyō 21-10-1943 13-01-1944 28-02-1944 Sunk by aircraft off Ticao Island, 25-09-1944.
No.128 Kawanami Kōgyō 10-11-1943 10-02-1944 18-03-1944 Sunk by aircraft off Morotai, 04-06-1944.
No.149 Hitachi Zōsen 01-11-1943 25-12-1943 20-02-1944 Converted to miscellaneous service ship (traffic boat) and renamed Kuroshio No. 2 (第二黒潮, Dai 2 Kuroshio?) on 10-02-1945. Sunk by USN submarine off Sumatra on 01-06-1945.
No.150 Hitachi Zōsen 28-12-1943 27-01-1944 10-03-1944 Sunk by aircraft off Palau, 27-07-1944.

No.103 class[edit]

Ship Builder Laid down Launched Completed Fate
No.103 Ōsaka Zōsen 28-01-1944 09-03-1944 01-05-1944 Sunk by aircraft off Iwo Jima, 04-07-1944.
No.104 Ōsaka Zōsen 12-02-1944 25-03-1944 25-05-1944 Sunk by aircraft west of Luzon, 15-12-1944.
No.105 Ōsaka Zōsen 12-03-1944 12-04-1944 15-06-1944 Sunk by USS Trepang south of Omaezaki, 11-10-1944
No.106 Ōsaka Zōsen 28-03-1944 25-04-1944 30-06-1944 Completed as Army SB No.120 at first. Sunk by aircraft at Lingayen Gulf, 15-12-1944.
No.107 Ōsaka Zōsen 15-04-1944 21-05-1944 20-07-1944 Completed as Army SB No.123 at first. Sunk by USN destroyer west of Haha-jima, 05-01-1945.
No.108 Ōsaka Zōsen 28-04-1944 25-05-1944 31-07-1944 Completed as Army SB No.125 at first. Decommissioned 03-05-1947. Surrendered to United Kingdom at Singapore, 17-10-1947.
No.109 Ōsaka Zōsen 15-08-1944 Transferred to the Army, SB craft.
No.110 Ōsaka Zōsen 28-05-1944 23-06-1944 05-09-1944 Completed as Army SB craft at first. Decommissioned 15-09-1945. Surrendered to United Kingdom at Singapore, 17-10-1947.
No.111 Ōsaka Zōsen 13-06-1944 10-07-1944 15-09-1944 Completed as Army SB craft at first. Sunk by aircraft at Masbate, 24-11-1944.
No.112 Ōsaka Zōsen 26-06-1944 22-07-1944 05-10-1944 Completed as Army SB craft at first. Sunk by aircraft west of Luzon, 07-01-1945.
No.113 Ōsaka Zōsen 13-07-1944 08-08-1944 15-10-1944 Completed as Army SB craft at first. Sunk by aircraft west of Luzon, 25-11-1944.
No.114 Ōsaka Zōsen 25-07-1944 20-08-1944 30-10-1944 Completed as Army SB craft at first. Sunk by aircraft off Taiwan, 17-02-1945.
No.115 Ōsaka Zōsen 12-08-1944 07-09-1944 13-11-1944 Completed as Army SB craft at first. Sunk by aircraft north of Luzon, 02-02-1945.
No.116 Ōsaka Zōsen 24-11-1944 Transferred to the Army, and renamed SB No.103.
No.117 Ōsaka Zōsen 22-12-1944 Transferred to the Army, SB craft.
No.118 Ōsaka Zōsen 30-12-1944 Transferred to the Army, SB craft.
No.119 Ōsaka Zōsen 16-01-1945 Transferred to the Army, SB craft.
No.120 Ōsaka Zōsen 05-02-1945 Transferred to the Army, SB craft.
No.121 Ōsaka Zōsen 20-02-1945 Transferred to the Army, SB craft.
No.122 Ōsaka Zōsen 22-03-1945 Transferred to the Army, SB craft.
No.123 Ōsaka Zōsen 22-03-1945 Transferred to the Army, SB craft.
No.124 Ōsaka Zōsen 08-05-1945 Transferred to the Army, SB craft.
No.125 Ōsaka Zōsen Transferred to the Army, and renamed SB No.127. Not completed until the end of war.
No.126 Ōsaka Zōsen Transferred to the Army, and renamed SB No.128. Not completed until the end of war.
No.129 Kawanami Kōgyō 10-12-1943 25-02-1944 12-05-1944 Sunk by USS Cod in the Banda Sea, 14-08-1944.
No.130 Kawanami Kōgyō 20-01-1944 05-04-1944 03-06-1944 Sunk by aircraft off Iwo Jima, 04-07-1944.
No.131 Kawanami Kōgyō 05-02-1944 23-04-1944 24-06-1944 Converted to miscellaneous service ship (traffic boat) and renamed Kuroshio No. 1 (第一黒潮, Dai 1 Kuroshio?) on 10-02-1945. Sunk by USN submarine in the Strait of Malacca on 27-07-1945.[5]
No.132 Kawanami Kōgyō 25-02-1944 05-05-1944 28-06-1944 Sunk by USN destroyer at Iwo Jima, 27-12-1944.
No.133 Sasebo Naval Arsenal 10-04-1944 07-06-1944 04-07-1944 Sunk by aircraft off Iwo Jima, 04-08-1944.
No.134 Kawanami Kōgyō 10-04-1944 15-06-1944 15-07-1945 Scuttled by stormy weather at Iwo Jima, 04-10-1944.
No.135 Kawanami Kōgyō 28-04-1944 26-06-1944 25-07-1944 Sunk by aircraft at west coast of Luzon, 18-10-1944.
No.136 Kawanami Kōgyō 10-05-1944 15-07-1944 20-08-1944 Sunk by aircraft at west coast of Luzon, 18-10-1944.
No.137 Kawanami Kōgyō 01-06-1944 20-07-1944 28-08-1944 Decommissioned 05-10-1945. Surrendered to Soviet Union at Nakhodka, 03-10-1947.
No.138 Kawanami Kōgyō 18-06-1944 03-08-1944 04-09-1944 Sunk by USS Kingfish off Iwo Jima, 26-10-1944.
No.139 Kawanami Kōgyō 05-07-1944 18-08-1944 25-09-1944 Sunk by aircraft at west coast of Luzon, 12-11-1944.
No.140 Sasebo Naval Arsenal 26-07-1944 16-09-1944 14-10-1944 Sunk by aircraft at Saigon, 13-01-1945.
No.141 Sasebo Naval Arsenal 29-07-1944 16-09-1944 19-10-1944 Sunk by aircraft at Masbate, 24-11-1944.
No.142 Kawanami Kōgyō 01-08-1944 20-09-1944 02-11-1944 Sunk by aircraft at west coast of Luzon, 25-11-1944.
No.143 Kawanami Kōgyō 14-08-1944 03-10-1944 25-11-1944 Sunk by aircraft at Penghu, 26-03-1945.
No.144 Kawanami Kōgyō 20-08-1944 20-10-1944 01-12-1944 Decommissioned 05-10-1945, later scrapped.
No.145 Kawanami Kōgyō 05-09-1944 15-11-1944 16-12-1944 Sunk by USN aircraft at Amami Ōshima, 02-04-1945.[6]
No.146 Kawanami Kōgyō 24-09-1944 30-11-1944 30-12-1944 Sunk by USS Trepang south of Gotō Islands, 28-04-1945.
No.147 Kawanami Kōgyō 06-10-1944 15-12-1944 25-01-1945 Decommissioned 15-09-1945. Surrendered to United States at Yokosuka, 13-11-1947. Scrapped 31-03-1948.
No.148 Kawanami Kōgyō 31-01-1945 Transferred to the Army, and renamed SB No.113.
No.151 Hitachi Zōsen 29-01-1944 27-02-1944 23-04-1944 Sunk by USS Besugo north of Palawan, 23-11-1944.
No.152 Hitachi Zōsen 29-02-1944 24-03-1944 25-05-1944 Sunk by aircraft at Iwo Jima, 04-08-1944.
No.153 Hitachi Zōsen 15-02-1944 08-04-1944 15-06-1944 Decommissioned 30-11-1945. Scrapped 1948.
No.154 Hitachi Zōsen 26-03-1944 23-04-1944 05-07-1944 Completed as Army SB craft at first. Sunk by USN destroyer at Iwo Jima, 05-01-1945.
No.155 Hitachi Zōsen 19-07-1944 Transferred to the Army, SB craft.
No.156 Hitachi Zōsen 05-08-1944 Transferred to the Army, SB craft.
No.157 Hitachi Zōsen 12-05-1944 06-09-1944 19-08-1944 Sunk by USN destroyer at Iwo Jima, 24-12-1944.
No.158 Hitachi Zōsen 24-05-1944 23-06-1944 04-09-1944 Sunk by aircraft at Naha, 10-10-1944.
No.159 Hitachi Zōsen 10-06-1944 08-07-1944 16-09-1944 Sunk by a bombardment of US Army tanks and artillery at Ormoc Bay, 12-12-1944.
No.160 Hitachi Zōsen 01-07-1944 08-08-1944 30-09-1944 Sunk by aircraft at Masbate, 24-11-1944.
No.161 Hitachi Zōsen 09-07-1944 22-08-1944 14-10-1944 Sunk by aircraft at west coast of Luzon, 25-11-1944.
No.162 Hitachi Zōsen 23-10-1944 Transferred to the Army, and renamed SB No.101. Scrapped April 1948.
No.163 Hitachi Zōsen 31-10-1944 Transferred to the Army, and renamed SB No.102.
No.164 Ōsaka Zōsen 11-04-1945 Construction stopped; later scrapped.
No.165 Ōsaka Zōsen 28-04-1945 Construction stopped; later scrapped.
6 vessels They were cancelled before being named.
No.172 Kawanami Kōgyō 24-11-1944 27-01-1945 10-03-1945 Decommissioned 15-09-1945. Surrendered to Republic of China at Qingdao, 03-10-1947. Renamed Lui Shan (AP-308). Decommissioned 1955.
No.173 Kawanami Kōgyō 08-12-1944 15-02-1945 01-04-1945 Sunk by aircraft at Ryukyu Islands, 22-05-1945.
No.174 Kawanami Kōgyō 03-01-1945 15-03-1945 14-07-1945 Decommissioned 20-11-1945; scrapped in 1948.
No.175 Kawanami Kōgyō 02-02-1945 11-04-1945 Construction stopped 11-04-1945. Sunk by typhoon 15-09-1945; scrapped on 01-10-1948.
No.176 Kawanami Kōgyō 22-02-1945 25-06-1945 Construction stopped 25-06-1945; later scrapped.
7 vessels They were cancelled before being named.
No.184 Hitachi Zōsen 30-11-1944 Transferred to the Army, SB craft.
No.185 Hitachi Zōsen 10-12-1944 Transferred to the Army, SB craft.
No.186 Hitachi Zōsen 24-12-1944 Transferred to the Army, SB craft.
No.187 Hitachi Zōsen 13-01-1945 Transferred to the Army, and renamed SB No.114. Scrapped May 1948.
No.188 Hitachi Zōsen 29-01-1945 Transferred to the Army, SB craft.
15 vessels They were cancelled before being named.

Photos[edit]

See also[edit]

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ The SB meaning are S = Sensha, and B = Kaigun.
  2. ^ The Kampon Mk.A Model 25 (艦本式甲二五型, Kampon Kō 25-gata?) all geared turbine.
  3. ^ The No.106, No.107, No.108, No.110, No.111, No.112, No.113, No.114, No.115 and No.154.
  4. ^ No.147, SB No.101 and SB No.108 can confirm it from a photograph. Their chimney was very tall.
  5. ^ "Memorial stone in Sasebo". 
  6. ^ "Japanese Escorts". Combinedfleet.com. Retrieved 2 April 2013. 

Bibliography[edit]

  • "Rekishi Gunzō". , History of the Pacific War Vol. 51, "The truth histories of the Imperial Japanese Vessels Part.2", Gakken (Japan), 2005, ISBN 4-05-604083-4.
  • Rekishi Gunzō, History of the Pacific War Vol. 62, "Ships of the Imperial Japanese Forces", Gakken (Japan), January 2008, ISBN 978-4-05-605008-0
  • The Maru Special, Japanese Naval Vessels No. 50, "Japanese minesweepers and landing ships", Ushio Shobō (Japan), 1981.
  • Ships of the World, Special issue Vol. 47, "Auxiliary Vessels of the Imperial Japanese Navy", "Kaijinsha". , (Japan), 1997.
  • Shizuo Fukui, Japanese Naval Vessels Survived, "Their post-war activities and final disposition", Shuppan Kyodosha (Japan), 1961.
  • Shizuo Fukui, FUKUI SHIZUO COLLECTION "Japanese Naval Vessels 1869–1945", KK Bestsellers (Japan), 1994.