No Light, No Light

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
"No Light, No Light"
Single by Florence + the Machine
from the album Ceremonials
Released 16 January 2012
Recorded Abbey Road Studios
Genre
Length 4:34
Label Island
Writer(s) Florence Welch, Isabella Summers
Producer(s) Paul Epworth
Florence + the Machine singles chronology
"Shake It Out"
(2011)
"No Light, No Light"
(2012)
"Never Let Me Go"
(2012)
Ceremonials track listing
Music video
"No Light, No Light" on YouTube

"No Light, No Light" is a song by English indie band Florence and the Machine from their second studio album, Ceremonials (2011). The song was written by band members Florence Welch and Isabella Summers while the production was handled by Paul Epworth. Island Records released the song as the second single from the album on 16 January 2012. The song was the first one written for the album in the band's tour bus in Amsterdam. Musically, it incorporates baroque pop, art rock and symphonic rock styles while lyrically, in the song, Welch is expressing frustration about the state of her fragile relationship and she further tries to keep it together. "No Light, No Light" received positive reviews by music critics who generally praised Welch's vocals and the drum-led instrumentation. It was also placed on several critics' year-end lists of best singles. The song peaked at number fifty on the UK Singles Chart, the Irish Singles Chart and number thirty nine on the US Billboard Alternative Songs chart.

An accompanying music video for the song premiered on 18 November 2011 and is directed by Icelandic duo Arni & Kinski. It includes shots of Welch singing on a skyscraper and being chased by a contortionist. Upon its release, the video received mixed to positive reviews by critics who praised the dramatic shots, the religion and voodoo references. However, following its online release, several publications and users on various websites commented on the use of racism and racial imagery due to the black face of the voodoo man at the beginning, which Welch later denied. "No Light, No Light" was performed live by the band several times on television shows and at the 2012 BRIT Awards held at The O2 Arena in London. They also performed the song during the encore of their second worldwide Ceremonials Tour (2011–12).

Background and release[edit]

Florence Welch (left) and Isabella Summers (right) wrote "No Light, No Light".

"No Light, No Light" was written by band members Florence Welch and Isabella Summers while the production was handled by Paul Epworth.[1][2] The song was recorded in 2011 at the Abbey Road Studios.[2] According to Welch, "No Light, No Light" was the first song written for the album.[3] During an interview with MTV News she confirmed the release of the song.[3] Welch further revealed that the intro of the song was written during the tour in Amsterdam, "We had gone out for Rob [Ackroyd]'s birthday to an all-night restaurant in Brussels called Midnights. We went to this funny restaurant and then got on the tour bus and everyone was a bit drunk and it was like, 'Yeah, let's write a song.'"[3] Welch also said that "No Light, No Light" was also recorded in Amsterdam, "And we recorded the sound of the bus moving, a real drone-y bass sound, and that's the intro, and then the tour bus arrived in Amsterdam [and we were saying], 'Let's go toast this song! We will find a bar that will serve us drinks at 7 in the morning! Come!'.[...] So we trotted off into Amsterdam and managed to find a sports bar that would only serve us Midori. It was bright-green drinks and me and Isa [Summers] kind of looking like crazy old ladies."[3] During an interview with Los Angeles Times, Welch further described the song as "one of the biggest tracks on the album."[4] Island Records released the song as the third single from Ceremonials on 16 January with two remixes by Dave Sitek and Breakage.[5][6] Consequence of Sound's Chris Coplan gave a mixed review for the remix by Dave Sitek, saying: "In the able hands of Sitek, 'No Light, No Light' loses some of its melodramatic air, replaced instead with an effervescent, club-ready vibe. Both tracks may be decidedly similar, but they'll evoke wholly unique sets of emotions."[7] A limited 12" vinyl single was released simultaneously with the remix single.[7][8]

Composition[edit]

"No Light, No Light" is baroque pop, art rock and symphonic rock song. According to the sheet music published on the website Musicnotes.com by Universal Music Publishing Group, "No Light, No Light" is written in the key of A Minor with 132 beats per minute.[9] Welch's vocals range from the note G3 to E5.[9] The song begins with pulsating tribal drums and lyrics talking about fighting with snakes as stated by Kyle Anderson of Entertainment Weekly.[10][11] According to Billboard magazine's Jillian Mapes, "A dramatic opening note on the... [song] ushers in a drum crescendo, followed by a 'Like a Prayer' - style interlude."[11] During the choir-led chorus, Welch sings the lines, "You can choose what stays and what fades away/ And I'd do anything to make you stay/ No light, no light/ Tell me what you want me to say" over "thundering tribal" beats and harp strings that "grow louder and louder".[12][13] Lyrically, in the song she's expressing frustration about the state of her fragile relationship and she further tries to keep it together.[12][14] Ryan Dombal of the website Pitchfork Media commented that "No Light, No Light" was one of the songs where Welch "sets aside her usual flighty, dreamy, goth-y lyrical go-to's-- ghosts, graveyards, devils, angels, myths, drowning-- for something a bit more personal."[15] During the musical bridge of the song, Welch sings the lines "Would you leave me, if I told you what I'd become. 'Cause it's so easy to sing it to a crowd/ But it's so hard, my love/ To say it to you out loud",[15] which according to Mapes shows Welch "on her knees, begging her lover not to go".[11] Alix Buscovic of BBC Online compared the song with Florence and the Machine's earlier song "Cosmic Love",[16] while Newsday's Glenn Gamboa compared "No Light, No Light" with Kate Bush's songs.[17] Sam Wolfson of The Guardian joked that the song talks about Tess Daly.[18]

Critical reception[edit]

"No Light, No Light" received mostly positive reviews from music critics. Ryan Dombal of the website Pitchfork Media praised the song, saying that the lines "double as a snippet of self-criticism."[15] He added: "Perhaps Welch finds it 'so easy' to sing her tunes to thousands because they often lack an individual touch that could send them even further skyward-- the same touch that comes so naturally to fellow UK chart queen Adele."[15] Spin's Rob Harvilla commented that "No Light, No Light" was "a desperate lovers' quarrel, all agitated strings and galloping drums (no broken jaws or burning beds this time, alas)."[19] Clash magazine's Laura Foster called the song "uplifting" and "typically Florence-sounding" further putting it in her list of "six massive anthems" on Ceremonials.[20] Alex Buscovic of the website BBC Online called "No Light, No Light" a "drum-chased, harp-gilded and hook-jawed" song.[16] However, Buscovic commented that its "epic proportions are too much."[16] Randall Roberts of Los Angeles Times called the song an anthem, which according to him, was "as overpowering as 'Dog Days Are Over.'"[4] In his review of Ceremonials, Jillian Mapes of Billboard wrote "'I'd do anything to make you stay / Tell me what you want me to say,' she pleads atop the album's most pulsating tribal drumbeat. Musically, the song exudes utter strength; lyrically, Welch is on her knees."[21] In a review of the album, Rebecca Nicholson of The Guardian commented,

"A wonky piano, a choir and the return of the harp, as well as more Phil Collins-ey drums, in the tale of what appears to be a humdinger of a domestic – 'Kiss with a Fist', but more grown-up, and colder. 'I'd do anything to make you stay,' she sings, before switching tack: 'You want a revelation, no light no light in your bright blue eyes.' Like the rest of these tracks, it's kitchen sink and then some, but there's a little more texture here."[22]

In the review of the album, Lewis Corner of the website Digital Spy said that the song "manages to sound knee-quiveringly epic".[14] Later, in a separate review of the single he graded it with five stars out of five commenting that "she pleads to her beau in her unmistakable folk-tinged timbre".[12] The Boston Globe's Mesfin Fekadu noted that Welch's vocals were "bossy" in the track.[23] Luren Murphy of The Irish Times reviewed the song positively saying that it's "providing the huge choruses and skyscraping vocals we’ve come to expect of Florence and the Machine".[24] However, Eoin Butler of the same publication rated the song with two out of five stars commenting, "Like most of Florence's recent singles, this bombastic effort sounds as though it was intended to be enjoyed not on an iPod or CD player but rather sitting in Row 198 in the local EnormoDome."[25] Priya Elan of NME noted that the song was "the most traditionally Florence-like track" further comparing it with "Rabbit Heart (Raise It Up)" (2009) and with songs by Björk.[26] A writer of the website Slant Magazine said, "The album is steeped in melodrama, with pump organs, choirs, and strings expertly deployed as pure pomp on...'No Light, No Light.'"[27]

Time placed the song at number one on their list of "Top 10 Songs of 2011". The writer further commented: "In another context, this 'No Light, No Light' could be the sound of a religious revival. Florence Welch's rich voice has never sounded better than on this track; her fervent, even rapturous, lamentations about her partner's lost love resonate like requests for salvation made by a faltering believer with arms raised to the sky. 'Heaven help me, I need to make it right' she wails, but gets no reply. Replete with harps and a tribal drum beat, 'No Light, No Light' operates as a plea for salvation that will soon have you running to your deity of choice."[28] On the Triple J Hottest 100 list, "No Light, No Light" was ranked at number thirty-six.[29] It was also ranked at number three hundred and forty three on The Village Voice's year-end Pazz & Jop singles list.[30]

Commercial performance[edit]

"No Light, No Light" debuted at number sixty-seven on the UK Singles Chart dated 28 January 2012.[31] It eventually peaked at number fifty for the week ending 3 March 2012 following the band's performance at the 2012 BRIT Awards, selling 6,909 copies.[31][32] On the Hungarian Airplay Chart, the song debuted at number forty on 6 February 2012 and later peaked at number thirty-six for the week ending 27 February 2012.[33] On 1 March 2012, "No Light, No Light" debuted at number fifty on the Irish Singles Chart and failed to re-enter the chart.[34] On the ARIA Singles Chart, the song debuted and peaked at number ninety-five for the week commencing 30 January 2012.[35] On the Belgian Ultratip Singles Chart, the song peaked at number ten on 21 January 2012.[36] In the US, the song debuted at number thirty-nine on the Billboard Alternative Songs chart.[37] On the chart issue dated 25 April 2012, the song debuted at number forty-eight on the US Billboard Rock Songs chart.[38]

Music video[edit]

Background and release[edit]

An accompanying music video for the song was released on Florence and the Machine's official Vevo account on 18 November 2011. It was directed by Icelandic duo Arni & Kinski.[39] A teaser was also uploaded on their Vevo account on 15 November 2011. During an interview with MTV News, Welch revealed some of the stories behind the inspiration of the music video saying, "When [directors Arni and Kinski] pitched it to me, I loved the idea of stained glass ... and this falling thing, to do it on a New York skyline was really important to me, and there's some weird stuff with my grandmother about New York that's kind of too dark to go into... The idea of falling from a great height in New York is intense ... because my grandmother, she died in New York, and I literally didn't think about it until we were filming and I was like, 'This is kind of insane.'"[40]

Synopsis[edit]

The video begins with Welch lying next to a crystal skull. Several scenes showing a masked and shirtless contortionist sitting on a chair follow and soon after he starts to dance and takes his mask off. The video then moves into a church where a choir consisting of kids (The Trinity Boys Choir) starts singing the song. Welch is then seen atop of a building as the contortionist takes a voodoo doll in his hands. He puts a needle in the doll and Welch falls from the building. She later falls in the church where she's being caught and held by the choir.[41] Shots of Welch being chased by the contortionist in a town are interspersed amongst the other elements of the video.

Reception[edit]

Marc Hogan of Spin concluded that the video, "touches on the fine line between spiritual ecstasy and reckless abandon."[42] Jillian Mapes of Billboard magazine commented that the video is exploring a "territory between Christianity and voodoo spirituality."[43] Mapes further praised the video for being dramatic, but he wrote that "more than that, it's completely absurd."[43] A writer of Rolling Stone concluded: "[the video] does not shy away from matching the music's melodramatic intensity. In addition to contrasting overtly Christian iconography with images of some kind of voodoo priest, the harrowing climax is paired with footage of Florence Welch falling from the top of a skyscraper."[44] Writing for Dose, Leah Collins found "seriously life-threatening juju going on in No Light, No Light [video]"[45] Nick Neyland of Prefix Magazine wrote: "That song ["No Light. No Light"] just got a suitably opulent video, which is full of religious imagery, Florence perched atop a building in Manhattan, and a strange masked figure. What does it all mean? We have no idea, but anyone who's afraid of heights may want to look away when Florence starts flinging herself across that rooftop and ultimately takes to the skies and starts flying (seriously)."[46] Eoin Butler of The Irish Times praised the boys dressed as priests comparing the scenes with a Catholic version of 1976 film Bugsy Malone.[25]

Controversy[edit]

Following the online release of the video, several publications and users on various websites commented on the use of racism and racial imagery due to the black face of the voodoo man at the beginning.[18][39][47][48] During an interview with MTV News, when asked by James Montgomery if she was a part of the Illuminati as online accusations claim, Welch responded, "That's ridiculous. Really? So people [think that?] I'm definitely not [a member]. It's just not true."[40]

Live performances[edit]

The band performed the song live for the first time during the show Later... with Jools Holland on 1 November 2011.[49] Matthew Perpetua of Rolling Stone praised the performance saying: "Florence Welch is backed by her full band plus a string section, but as overwhelming as the sound gets, her incredible voice remains the focal point of the performance."[50] Later, on 20 November 2011, they performed the song on Saturday Night Live.[51][52][53] On 14 January, the band performed the song on The Jonathan Ross Show.[54] The performance aired on ITV and its regional counterparts at 9:30 pm on 14 January 2012. Nick Neyland of Prefix Magazine praised the performance saying, "Here, Florence delivers an efficient version of the track, via an extremely stoic performance in which she appears clad all in black and barely moves for the duration. The lavish musical backing and her impressive pipes do that talking here, creating the kind of anthemic feel that fast became her M.O. from day one."[55]

They performed the song at the 2012 BRIT Awards at The O2 Arena in London backed by twenty dancers dressed in a white and gold gown.[56][57][58] After the event, the live performance was made available for digital download through the iTunes Store in the United Kingdom.[59] Michael Hogan of The Daily Telegraph compared the dancing during the performance with the dancing by Kate Bush and comparing it with a "tad drama school". He further called the performance "over-the-top" but noted that "Florence Welch's vocals included one hell of a long held note, though".[60] Ann Lee of Metro described their performance as "rousing",[61] while Dave Benett of The Sun said that the performance "bowed" the crowd at The O2 Arena.[62] However, Andy Gill of The Independent was more negative about the performance saying that "Florence brought along her Machine, but... forgot to pack a decent tune with them."[63]

On 23 April 2012, the band performed the song on the second season of the show The Voice while being backed by the group mentored by Cee Lo Green.[64][65] Jennifer Still of the website Digital Spy praised the performance, calling it "incredible".[66] Florence and the Machine also added the song to the set list during their second worldwide Ceremonials Tour where the song was performed during the encore of the concerts along with "Never Let Me Go".[67]

Uses in popular culture[edit]

The song's Spector Ryan Gosling remix was featured in The CW series The Secret Circle,[68] at the end of the sixteenth episode ("Lucky"). The original version was also prominently featured at the end of the sixteenth episode ("Rest in Pieces") of the tenth season of the CBS series CSI: Miami.[69] The song was used in the Fox series The Mob Doctor, in the fourth season finale of Syfy's Warehouse 13 and in promotional commercials for NBC's Revolution. The song was featured in the fifth episode of the ninth and final season of The CW series One Tree Hill. [70]

Track listing[edit]

  1. "No Light, No Light" – 4:34
  2. "No Light, No Light" (Breakage's One Moment Less For Mortimer Mix) – 4:14
  3. "No Light, No Light" (DAS Remix) – 4:39
  1. "No Light, No Light" (Breakage's One Moment Less For Mortimer Mix) – 4:14
  2. "No Light, No Light" (DAS Remix) – 4:39
  • Limited 12" single[8]
  1. "No Light, No Light" – 4:34
  2. "No Light, No Light" (DAS Remix) – 4:39

Charts[edit]

Chart (2012) Peak
position
Australia (ARIA)[35] 95
Belgium (Ultratip Flanders)[36] 10
Hungary (Rádiós Top 40)[33] 36
Ireland (IRMA)[34] 50
UK Singles (Official Charts Company)[31] 50
US Alternative Songs (Billboard)[37] 17
US Rock Songs (Billboard)[38] 26

References[edit]

  1. ^ Corner, Lewis (18 November 2011). "Florence Welch falls off skyscraper in 'No Light, No Light' video". Digital Spy. Hachette Filipacchi Médias. Retrieved 18 November 2011. 
  2. ^ a b Ceremonials (liner notes). Florence and the Machine. Island Records. 2011. 
  3. ^ a b c d Montgomery, James (18 October 2011). "Florence And The Machine Reveal Next Single: Exclusive". MTV News. MTV Networks. Retrieved 18 November 201. 
  4. ^ a b Roberts, Randall (27 October 2011). "On eve of 'Ceremonials,' Florence Welch talks about 'Breaking Down'". Los Angeles Times (Tribune Company). Retrieved 18 November 2011. 
  5. ^ a b "No Light, No Light - Single by Florence + The Machine". iTunes Store UK. Apple Inc. Retrieved 4 March 2012. 
  6. ^ Battan, Carrie (18 November 2012). "Watch: New Florence and the Machine Video: "No Light, No Light"". Pitchfork Media. Retrieved 4 March 2012. 
  7. ^ a b Sitek, Dave (20 December 2011). "Check Out: Florence and the Machine – "No Light, No Light" (Dave Sitek remix)". Consequence of Sound. Complex Media. Retrieved 4 March 2012. 
  8. ^ a b "No Light, No Light - Limited Edition Vinyl". Florence and the Machine's official website. 16 January 2012. Retrieved 4 March 2012. 
  9. ^ a b Welch, Florence; Summers, Isabella (2011). "Florence and the Machine – 'No Light, No Light' – Digital Sheet Music". Musicnotes.com. Universal Music Publishing Group. MN0099215. 
  10. ^ Anderson, Kyle (26 October 2011). "Ceremonials (2011): Florence + The Machine". Entertainment Weekly (Time Inc.). Retrieved 18 November 2011. 
  11. ^ a b c Mapes, Jillian (9 December 2011). "Track Review: Florence & The Machine, 'No Light, No Light'". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved 11 April 2012. 
  12. ^ a b c Corner, Lewis (6 January 2012). "Florence + the Machine: "No Light, No Light" - single reviews". Digital Spy. Hachette Filipacchi Médias. Retrieved 6 January 2012. 
  13. ^ Copsey, Robert (15 September 2011). "Florence + the Machine's new album 'Ceremonials' - First listen". Digital Spy. Hachette Filipacchi Médias. Retrieved 4 March 2012. 
  14. ^ a b Corner, Lewis (1 November 2011). "Florence + the Machine: 'Ceremonials' - Album review". Digital Spy. Hachette Filipacchi Médias. Retrieved 4 March 2012. 
  15. ^ a b c d Dombal, Ryan (3 November 2011). "Florence and the Machine: Ceremonials". Pitchfork Media. Retrieved 18 November 2011. 
  16. ^ a b c Buscovic, Alix (27 October 2011). "Review of Florence + The Machine – Ceremonials". BBC Music. BBC Online. Retrieved 18 November 2011. 
  17. ^ Gamboa, Glenn (28 October 2011). "Florence and the Machine's 'Ceremonials'". Newsday. Retrieved 4 March 2012. 
  18. ^ a b Wolfson, Sam (14 January 2012). "This week's new singles". The Guardian (London: Guardian Media Group). Retrieved 4 March 2012. 
  19. ^ Harvilla, Rob. "Florence and the Machine, 'Ceremonials' (Universal Republic)". Spin. Spin Media LLC. Retrieved 18 November 2011. 
  20. ^ Foster, Laura (24 October 2011). "Florence And The Machine – Ceremonials". Clash. Retrieved 18 November 2011. 
  21. ^ Mapes, Jillian (2 November 2011). "Florence + The Machine, 'Ceremonials': Track-By-Track Review". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved 18 November 2011. 
  22. ^ Nicholson, Rebecca (15 September 2011). "irst listen: Florence and the Machine's new album, Ceremonials". The Guardian (London: Guardian Media Group). Retrieved 4 March 2012. 
  23. ^ Fekadu, Mesfin (31 October 2011). "Review: Florence + the Machine makes magic again". The Associated Press. The Boston Globe. The New York Times Company. Retrieved 4 March 2012. 
  24. ^ Murphy, Luren (28 October 2011). "Behind the machine". The Irish Times (Irish Times Trust). Retrieved 4 March 2012. 
  25. ^ a b Butler, Eoin (25 November 2011). "Shuffle". The Irish Times (Irish Times Trust). Retrieved 4 March 2012. 
  26. ^ Elan, Priya (13 September 2011). "First Listen - Florence & The Machine, 'Ceremonials'". NME. IPC Media. Retrieved 4 March 2012. 
  27. ^ "The 25 Best Albums of 2011". Slant Magazine. 14 December 2011. p. 1. Retrieved 8 March 2012. 
  28. ^ Suddath, Claire (7 December 2011). "Top 10 Songs of 2011". Time (Time Inc). Retrieved 8 December 2011. 
  29. ^ Adams, Cameron (27 January 2012). "Gotye tops Triple J's Hottest 100 countdown". The Sunday Times. News Limited. Retrieved 4 March 2012. 
  30. ^ "New York Pazz and Jop Singles - 2011". The Village Voice. Village Voice Media. Retrieved 19 March 2012. 
  31. ^ a b c "Florence & The Machine – No Light No Light". Chart Stats. Archived from the original on 7 April 2012. Retrieved 4 March 2012. 
  32. ^ Jones, Alan (27 February 2012). "Official Chart Analysis: Week-on-week album sales fall despite Brits – as Adele's 21 shifts another 65k". Music Week. Intent Media. Retrieved 4 March 2012. 
  33. ^ a b "Archívum – Slágerlisták – MAHASZ – Magyar Hanglemezkiadók Szövetsége" (in Hungarian). Rádiós Top 40 játszási lista. Magyar Hanglemezkiadók Szövetsége. Retrieved 9 March 2012.
  34. ^ a b "Chart Track". Irish Singles Chart. Retrieved 4 March 2012.
  35. ^ a b "Chartifacts – Week Commencing: 30th January 2012". ARIA Charts. Archived from the original on 4 February 2012. Retrieved 31 January 2012. 
  36. ^ a b "Ultratop.be – Florence + The Machine – No Light, No Light" (in Dutch). Ultratip. Retrieved 4 March 2012.
  37. ^ a b "Florence + The Machine Album & Song Chart History" Billboard Alternative Songs for Florence + The Machine. Retrieved 3 April 2012.
  38. ^ a b "Florence and the Machine – Chart history: Hot Rock Songs". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved 21 April 2013. 
  39. ^ a b "Florence And The Machine spark controversy with 'racist' 'No Light, No Light' video". NME. IPC Media. 22 November 2011. Retrieved 23 November 2011. 
  40. ^ a b Montgomery, James (19 December 2011). "Florence And The Machine Call Illuminati Rumor 'Ridiculous'". MTV News. MTV Networks. Retrieved 4 March 2012. 
  41. ^ "Watch Florence Welch fall off a skyscraper in new video for 'No Light No Light'". NME. IPC Media. 18 November 2011. Retrieved 18 November 2011. 
  42. ^ Hogan, Marc (18 November 2011). "Watch Florence + the Machine's Dramatic 'No Light, No Light' Video". Spin. Spin Media LLC. Retrieved 18 November 2011. 
  43. ^ a b Mapes, Jillian (18 November 2011). "Florence Welch Crowdsurfs Through Children's Choir in Epic 'No Light, No Light' Video". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved 18 November 2011. 
  44. ^ "Video: Florence and the Machine - 'No Light, No Light'". Rolling Stone. Wenner Media. 18 November 2011. Retrieved 18 November 2011. 
  45. ^ Collins, Leah (18 November 2011). "Video: Florence + The Machine Dabble in Dark Arts For 'No Light, No Light' Clip". Dose. Postmedia Network. Retrieved 18 November 2011. 
  46. ^ Neyland, Nick (18 November 2011). "Florence + The Machine: "No Light, No Light" (Video)". Prefix Magazine. Retrieved 18 November 2011. 
  47. ^ Greenwald, David (18 November 2011). "Florence + The Machine's 'No Light, No Light' Video Causes Comment Controversy". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved 23 November 2011. 
  48. ^ Nissim, Mayer (22 November 2011). "Florence + the Machine 'No Light, No Light' video accused of racism". Digital Spy. Hachette Filipacchi Médias. Retrieved 23 November 2011. 
  49. ^ Young, Alex (1 November 2011). "Video: Florence and the Machine, My Morning Jacket play Jools Holland". Consequence of Sound. Complex Media. Retrieved 18 November 2011. 
  50. ^ Perpetua, Matthew (3 November 2011). "Video: Florence and the Machine - 'No Light, No Light' on 'Jools Holland'". Rolling Stone. Wenner Media. Retrieved 18 November 2011. 
  51. ^ Semigran, Aly (20 November 2011). "'Saturday Night Live' recap: Jason Segel hosted, while the Muppets, Paul Rudd, and Olivia Wilde popped up. Believe it!". Entertainment Weekly. Time Inc. Retrieved 23 November 2011. 
  52. ^ Spin Staff (21 November 2011). "Watch Florence + the Machine Play 'Ceremonials' Tracks, Turkey-Themed Rap-Fusion Song on 'SNL'". Spin. Spin Media LLC. Retrieved 23 November 2011. 
  53. ^ Mapes, Jillian (21 November 2011). "Florence + the Machine Rocks 'SNL' With New Jack Swing Thanksgiving Song". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved 23 November 2011. 
  54. ^ "Watch Flo On The Jonathan Ross Show". Florence and the Machine's official website. 16 January 2012. Retrieved 4 March 2012. 
  55. ^ Neyland, Nick (16 January 2011). "Florence + The Machine: "No Light, No Light" (Live On Jonathan Ross) (Video)". Prefix Magazine. Retrieved 4 March 2012. 
  56. ^ Robinson, Peter (20 February 2012). "Brit awards 2012: what to look out for on music's bingo night". The Guardian (London: Guardian Media Group). Retrieved 4 March 2012. 
  57. ^ Eriksen, Alanah (22 February 2012). "'I'm flying the British flag for all of you':Adele and Ed Sheeran dominate at the BRITs as female and male artists of the year". Daily Mail (London: Daily Mail and General Trust). Retrieved 4 March 2012. 
  58. ^ Pink, Stuart; McGuire, Caroline (22 February 2012). "Song 2... Gong too - Winners Blur close Brits with 5 hits". The Sun (London: News International). Retrieved 4 March 2012. 
  59. ^ "No Light, No Light (Live from The BRITs) - Single by Florence + The Machine". iTunes Store. (UK) Apple Inc. Retrieved 4 March 2012. 
  60. ^ Hogan, Michael (21 February 2012). "Brit Awards 2012: as it happened". The Daily Telegraph (London: Telegraph Media Group). Retrieved 4 March 2012. 
  61. ^ Lee, Ann (22 February 2012). "Blur steal the show at Brit Awards but Rihanna fails to live up to expectations". Metro. Associated Newspapers. Retrieved 4 March 2012. 
  62. ^ Benett, Dave (22 February 2012). "Florence a Machine on the dance-floor". The Sun (London: News International). Retrieved 4 March 2012. 
  63. ^ Gill, Andy (22 February 2012). "Critic's View: The Brit Awards, O2 Arena, London". The Independent (Independent Print Limited). Retrieved 4 March 2012. 
  64. ^ Schreffler, Laura (25 April 2012). "Two more contestants are eliminated on The Voice...while Adam Levine's Britney Spears gamble earns Tony Lucca instant safety". Daily Mail (London: Daily Mail and General Trust). Retrieved 25 April 2012. 
  65. ^ Mallenbaum, Carly (23 April 2012). "'The Voice': Who had to sing for their lives?". USA Today (Gannett Company). Retrieved 25 April 2012. 
  66. ^ Still, Jennifer (25 April 2012). "'The Voice' quarter-final two results: Live blog". Digital Spy. Hachette Filipacchi Médias. Retrieved 25 April 2012. 
  67. ^ Sources for the performance of the song during the Ceremonials Tour:
  68. ^ "music from The Secret Circle -Lucky- heardontv". Retrieved 10 June 2012. 
  69. ^ "music from CSI: Miami -Rest in Pieces- heardontv". Retrieved 10 June 2012. 
  70. ^ http://www.oth-music.com/episode905.html
  71. ^ "No Light, No Light - Florence + The Machine". Amazon.co.uk. Retrieved 4 March 2012. 
  72. ^ "No Light, No Light - Single by Florence + The Machine". iTunes Store US. Apple Inc. Retrieved 4 March 2012. 
  73. ^ "No Light, No Light - Florence + The Machine". Amazon.com. Retrieved 4 March 2012. 

External links[edit]