No Stranger to Shame

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No Stranger to Shame
Studio album by Uncle Kracker
Released August 27, 2002
Recorded 2001-2002
Genre Rock, country pop, alternative rock, rap rock, pop rock
Length 50:10
Label Lava Records
Producer Michael Bradford, Uncle Kracker, Executive Producer Kid Rock
Uncle Kracker chronology
Double Wide
(2000)
No Stranger to Shame
(2002)
Seventy Two and Sunny
(2004)
Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
Allmusic 4/5 stars [1]
Entertainment Weekly B− [2]
Los Angeles Times 3/4 stars [3]

No Stranger to Shame is the follow-up album to Uncle Kracker's double-platinum Double Wide. It is currently the only Uncle Kracker album to have two charting singles on the Billboard Hot 100 (In a Little While & Drift Away).

Track listing[edit]

  • All songs composed by Uncle Kracker (credited as Matthew Shafer) and Mike Bradford unless noted.
  1. "Keep It Comin'" – 3:21
  2. "Thunderhead Hawkins" – 3:47
  3. "In a Little While" – 4:09
  4. "I Wish I Had a Dollar" – 4:03
  5. "Drift Away" (Mentor Williams) – 4:15
  6. "Baby Don't Cry" – 4:27
  7. "I Do" – 3:11
  8. "Memphis Soul Song" (Martin Gross, Shafer, Bradford) – 3:57
  9. "I Don't Know" – 3:57
  10. "To Think I Used to Love You" – 3:28
  11. "Letter to My Daughters" (David Allan Coe, Shafer, Bradford) – 3:08
  12. "No Stranger to Shame" – 8:27

Notes and trivia[edit]

  • A song entitled After School Special begins at the 4:41 mark of the last track on the explicit version of the album.
  • Since the song "No Stranger to Shame" ends at the 3:40 mark and "After School Special" starts at the 4:41 second mark, there is an entire 1:01 of silence.
  • "Thunderhead Hawkins" refers to an alter-ego of country music singer Hank Williams, Jr., which the song is about.
  • A remix of "To Think I Used to Love You" is featured on the CD soundtrack to the film Sweet Home Alabama.
  • "Drift Away" features Dobie Gray, who previously had a major hit with the song, in a vocal duet.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.allmusic.com/album/r603334/review
  2. ^ Sinclair, Tom (2002-09-27). "No Stranger to Shame Review". Entertainment Weekly. Retrieved 2012-05-04. 
  3. ^ Lecaro, Lina (2002-10-13). "Quick Spins (Uncle Kracker: No Stranger to Shame)". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 2012-12-23.