No Talking, Just Head

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No Talking, Just Head
Studio album by The Heads
Released October 8, 1996 (1996-10-08)
Recorded Clubhouse Music Studio
Genre New wave, art punk
Length 55:11
Label MCA
Producer The Heads
Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
Allmusic 2/5 stars[1]

No Talking, Just Head is an album released in 1996 by The Heads, a band composed of Jerry Harrison, Tina Weymouth, and Chris Frantz of Talking Heads, joined by a variety of guest singers. Its name may be seen as an allusion to the fact that Talking Heads' former vocalist, David Byrne, is the only member not involved. This was, at the time, intended to turn into a full-time project, with further studio albums and tour. Furthermore, a live CD/video of the first tour was planned, featuring performances of songs originally recorded by Talking Heads reinterpreted by the album's guest artists. However, David Byrne sued the band, asserting that their name and presentation was too evocative of Talking Heads, and put an end to those further-reaching plans, although the suit was settled out of court, and the album was released. [2][3] The band toured the US in the fall of 1996 with Johnette Napolitano serving as the primary lead vocalist.

"Damage I've Done" and "Don't Take My Kindness for Weakness" were released as singles.

Track listing[edit]

All songs written by Chris Frantz, Jerry Harrison, Tina Weymouth and T. "Blast" Murray; other lyricists in parentheses.

  1. "Damage I've Done" (Napolitano)
  2. "The King Is Gone" (Hutchence)
  3. "No Talking, Just Head"
  4. "Never Mind" (Hell)
  5. "No Big Bang" (McKee)
  6. "Don't Take My Kindness for Weakness" (Ryder)
  7. "No More Lonely Nights" (Anneteg)
  8. "Indie Hair" (Kowalczyk)
  9. "Punk Lolita"
  10. "Only the Lonely" (Gano)
  11. "Papersnow" (Partridge)
  12. "Blue Blue Moon" (Friday)

Personnel[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Allmusic review
  2. ^ "Talking Heads". Rolling Stone Magazine. Archived from the original on 2012-09-02. Retrieved 2012-09-02. 
  3. ^ ATHITAKIS, MARK. "David Byrne Feelings". salon.com. Archived from the original on 2012-09-02. Retrieved 2012-09-02.