Noam Gottesman

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Noam Gottesman
Noam Gottesman.jpg
Born 1963 (age 50–51)
Israel
Residence New York City
Ethnicity Jewish
Citizenship United States, United Kingdom
Occupation hedge fund manager
Known for co-founder of GLG Partners
Net worth Increase US$ 1.8 billion (Sept 2013)[1]
Spouse(s) Geraldine Gottesman (divorced)
Children Four
Parents Dov Gottesman

Noam Gottesman (born 1963)[2] is a New York City-based, Israeli-American[3] businessman and former hedge fund manager and co-founder of GLG Partners. Gottesman has a dual citizenship in the United States and United Kingdom and was listed on the April 2014 Forbes 400 list of richest people in America with a net worth of $2 billion.[1]

Early life and education[edit]

Gottesman was born to a Jewish family,[4] the son of Israel Museum President Dov Gottesman.[5] He received a B.A. from Columbia University.[1]

Career[edit]

Gottesman worked at the Goldman Sachs London office and became its executive director while managing global equity portfolios for their private client group.[6] He left Goldman Sachs in 1995 with Pierre Lagrange and Jonathan Green to co-found GLG Partners.[7] The company went on to manage $24.6 billion and become a publicly traded entity on the New York Stock Exchange (November 2007) and had up to $24.6 billion in assets under management.[8][9] Gottesman and his partners sold the company to the Man Group in October 2010 for $1.6 billion.[10][1][11] Gottesman continued to serve as GLG's co-CEO until January 2012 when he became the non-executive Chairman for GLG’s business in the US.[citation needed]

Gottesman is the CEO of the investment company TOMS Capital.[7] Other activities include ownership of the restaurant Eleven Madison Park[7] trustee at his alma mater Columbia University[12] and board member at the Tate Gallery Foundation.[13]

Personal life[edit]

Gottesman married Geraldine Gottesman and had four children. They later divorced.[7][14][15] Gottesman comes from a family of art collectors[16] and is among the 200 most notable collectors according to ARTnews.[17][18] He owns pieces by Francis Bacon and Lucian Freud and Andy Warhol.[7] In 2008, Gottesman sold his 14,700-square-foot mansion in London's Kensington neighborhood to billionaire steel tycoon Lakshmi Mittal.[19]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Forbes: The World's Billionaires - Noam Gottesman September 2013
  2. ^ Madison, Jennifer (2011-04-08). "Why there are no more billionaire bachelors: Almost all the world's most wealthy men are attached (and only 33 are under 50)". London: dailymail.co.uk. Retrieved 2012-10-06. 
  3. ^ Parkinson, Gary (2006-02-27). "Trader in insider dealing case not coming back, says GLG". London: The Independent. Retrieved 2008-07-12. 
  4. ^ Forbes Israel: Jewish Billionaires - Profile of Noam Gottesman April 14, 2013 (in Hebrew)
  5. ^ YNet News: "Lucy Liu visits Israel" by Ran Boker March 1, 2011
  6. ^ "Bloomberg Businessweek: Noam Gottesman". businessweek.com. Retrieved 2012-10-06. 
  7. ^ a b c d e "Forbes: The Worlds Billionaires: Noam Gottesman". forbes.com. Retrieved 2012-10-06. 
  8. ^ "GLG Partners, Inc". Nyse.com. Retrieved 2012-10-06. 
  9. ^ "A Public Hedge Fund With Good News to Report". The New York Times. 2008-02-06. 
  10. ^ Ebrahimi, Helia (2010-05-17). "GLG takes .6bn Man Group dowry in hedge fund marriage". The Daily Telegraph (London). 
  11. ^ "Peter Clarke". Bloomberg. 
  12. ^ [1][dead link]
  13. ^ "Tate Report 2007: Tate Britain and Tate Modern". tate.org.uk. 2010. Retrieved 2012-10-06. 
  14. ^ "So rich you just want to slap them!". London: dailymail.co.uk. 17 November 2006. Retrieved 6 October 2012. 
  15. ^ "London's 1000 most influential people 2011". Thisislondon.co.uk. 2011-11-07. Retrieved 2012-10-06. 
  16. ^ "Dov Gottesman19172011". ArtAsiaPacific. 2011-03-22. Retrieved 2012-10-06. 
  17. ^ [2][dead link]
  18. ^ "Which Wall Streeters ‘Run’ The Art Market?". Dealbreaker.com. 2011-01-27. Retrieved 2012-10-06. 
  19. ^ Martin, Arthur; McMeekin, James (2011-05-31). "Britain's richest street: The place by the palace, where the average house price is £19.5m". Daily Mail (London).