Noel Chiappa

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Noel Chiappa
JncSml.jpg
Born

Noel Chiappa
1956 (age 58)[citation needed]
Bermuda

J. Noel Chiappa (b. 1956 Bermuda) is an US-resident Internet pioneer and researcher working in the area of information systems architecture and software, principally computer networks.

Education[edit]

Chiappa attended Saltus Grammar School in Bermuda, and Phillips Academy and MIT in the US.

Career[edit]

As a staff researcher and Internet technology pioneer at the MIT Laboratory for Computer Science, Chiappa invented the multi-protocol router. In addition to wide use at MIT, that router was later used at Stanford in 1982; other multi-protocol routers at Stanford were implemented independently by William Yeager.[1][2][3] The MIT multi-protocol router became the basis of the multi-protocol router from Proteon, Inc., the first commercially-available multi-protocol router (January, 1986).

Chiappa also designed the original version of Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP).[4] He is acknowledged in several other RFC's, such as RFC-826, RFC-919, RFC-950 and others. He has worked extensively on the Locator/Identifier Separation Protocol (LISP).

He is currently working on long-term issues in both the Internet Research Task Force and Internet Engineering Task Force and its predecessors; he served as the Area Director for Internet Services of the Internet Engineering Steering Group from 1987-1992. Chiappa is listed on the "Birth of the Internet" plaque at the entrance to the Gates Computer Science Building, Stanford.[5]

Other interests[edit]

Among many non-technical interests, he is particularly interested in Japanese woodblock prints, and helps maintain online catalogue raisonnés for two major woodblock artists, Tsukioka Yoshitoshi and Utagawa Hiroshige II.

Personal life[edit]

Chiappa lives in Yorktown, Virginia with his family.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Valley of the Nerds: Who Really Invented the Multiprotocol Router, and Why Should We Care?, Public Broadcasting Service, Accessed August 11, 2007.
  2. ^ Router Man, NetworkWorld, Accessed June 22, 2007.
  3. ^ David D. Clark, "M.I.T. Campus Network Implementation", CCNG-2, Campus Computer Network Group, M.I.T., Cambridge, 1982; pp. 26.
  4. ^ RFC 783: THE TFTP PROTOCOL (REVISION 2) June 1981, Obsoleted by RFC-1350 July 1992
  5. ^ Plaque image

External links[edit]