Noel Cox

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The Reverend
Noel Cox
Noel Cox.jpg
Born (1965-06-03) 3 June 1965 (age 49)
Auckland, New Zealand
Occupation lawyer, academic and priest
Nationality New Zealand
Alma mater University of Auckland
Spouse Katy Cox
Website
www.aber.ac.uk/en/law-criminology/staffdirectory/noc1/

Noel Cox, FRHistS (born 3 June 1965) is a New Zealand-born lawyer, priest and a professor at Aberystwyth University, United Kingdom. He is a specialist in constitutional law, and an advocate of the Monarchy in New Zealand, having being a long-term Chairman of the Monarchist League of New Zealand, now Monarchy New Zealand.[1] He was also Convener of the Auckland District Law Society Public Issues Committee.[2] He was Head of the Department of Law and Criminology at Aberystwyth University, in Wales, 2010-2013,[3] and Head of the Department of Law at the Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand, 2004-2009. He is a priest in the Church in Wales.[4]

Academic career[edit]

He holds the degrees of LLB, LLM, MTheol, MA, PhD, as well as an LTh, a Graduate Diploma in Tertiary Teaching and a Certificate in Tertiary Teaching. He is also a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society (FRHistS).[5]

His main field of research interest is constitutional law (mainly aspects of the Crown, and ecclesiastical law). His work has been published in Australia, Canada, Ireland, Japan, New Zealand, the Netherlands, South Africa, the United Kingdom, and the United States of America. He has presented conference papers in Australia, England, Japan, the Netherlands, New Zealand, the United States of America, and Wales. He has taught in New Zealand, the Czech Republic, Poland and the United Kingdom.

Cox was Professor of Law, and 2004-2009 Head of the Department of Law, of the Faculty of Business and Law, at the Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand. He has also been a Visiting Fellow at the University of Cambridge (St Edmund's College[6] and Wolfson College) and The Australian National University. He taught for a decade at the Auckland University of Technology before moving to the United Kingdom.

From 2010 to 2014 he was Professor of Law (and Head of the Department of Law and Criminology 2010-2013) at Aberystwyth University, Wales.[7]

Legal career[edit]

He is a barrister. He was admitted and enrolled as a Barrister and Solicitor of the High Court of New Zealand 1988, admitted and enrolled as a Legal Practitioner of the Supreme Court of New South Wales 1999, admitted as a Barrister of the Supreme Court of Tasmania 1999, registered as a Practitioner of the Supreme Court of South Australia 1999, registered as a Legal Practitioner of the Supreme Court of the Northern Territory 2001, admitted as a Barrister and Solicitor of the Supreme Court of Victoria 2004, admitted as a Barrister of the Supreme Court of Queensland 2004, and registered as a Legal Practitioner of the Supreme Court of the Australian Capital Territory 2004. He was admitted as a Barrister-at-Law by the Honourable Society of the Inner Temple 2011.[8]

He was also Convener of the Auckland District Law Society Public Issues Committee,[9] and has commented in the media on legal matters,[10] especially constitutional law questions.[11]

Monarchist[edit]

Cox is a defender of the monarchy in New Zealand. He was Chairman of the Monarchist League of New Zealand from 2000 – 2010.[12] He regularly comments in the media about issues pertaining to the Crown and the monarchy.[13][14][15][16][17][18]

Cox is a Fellow of Monarchy New Zealand Inc, and a Patron of the Australian Monarchist League.[19]

Church life[edit]

Cox was an ordinand in the Diocesan Training Programme of the Diocese of Auckland, Anglican Church in Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia 2009-2010, and Sacristan at Holy Trinity Cathedral, Parnell, Auckland 2009-2010. From 2010 he was an ordinand in the Diocese of St Davids, Church in Wales. He was ordained a deacon in St David's Cathedral 30 June 2012, and is serving his title in the diocese as Non Stipendiary Assistant Curate in St Padarn's Church, Llanbadarn Fawr (since 2013, in the Group Benefice of Llanbadarn Fawr and Elerch and Penrhyncoch and Capel Bangor[20]).[21] Cox was ordained a priest 29 June 2013.[22]

Cox is a member of Credo Cymru, the Society of King Charles the Martyr, and The Mission Society of St Wilfrid and St Hilda.

Personal life[edit]

He received the Advanced Certificate of The Heraldry Society, and holds membership in various heraldic and academic dress associations, including HonCIL and FCIL, FFASL, FBS and FIAAH.

Cox is a member of the following organisations: Commonwealth Lawyers Association, Legal Research Foundation, The Australian and New Zealand Law and History Society, the International Association of Amateur Heralds, the Burgon Society (Fellow[23]), The Royal Historical Society (Fellow), The Society of Legal Scholars, The Ecclesiastical Law Society, the Honourable Society of the Inner Temple, The University of Auckland Legacy Society, The University of Wales Guild of Graduates, the International Commission and Association on Nobility, the Irish Peers’ Association (Associate Member), the Centre for Law and Religion (Distinguished Academic Associate),[24] and l'Académie européenne des sciences des arts et des lettres (Corresponding Member).

He has the Grand Cordon of the Royal and Hashemite Order of the Pearl of the Sultanate of Sulu (since 16 August 2011)[25] and is Legal Advisor to the Royal House. He is Legal Adviser of the Association of the Envoys Extraordinary of the Royal Lao Government in Exile (under approval of HRH Crown Prince Soulivong Savang, Head of the Lao Royal Family, and under guidance of HE Professor Khamphoui Sisavatdy, Prime Minister of the Royal Lao Government in Exile ) 2014, and a Knight, Order of Civic Merit (2014). He is a member of The St John Cymru-Wales Council for Ceredigion, specifically as liaison and guidance officer for Aberystwyth LINKS, the division based at Aberystwyth University.

Publications[edit]

His major publications include:

A series of monographs republish the majority of his refereed journal articles and book chapters, as well as some other legal publications:

  • The law of the church in the twenty-first century: Essays on law and religion (CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, 2013; ISBN 978-1-4927-5859-4) 304 pages;
  • Essays on Constitutional Law: with particular emphasis on the Crown (CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, 2013; ISBN 978-1-4937-5933-0) 728 pages;
  • Collected Essays: Part 1 (Ardwyn House Publishing, Aberystwyth, 2014; ISBN 978-1-4944-5657-3) 568 pages;
  • Collected Essays: Part 2 (Ardwyn House Publishing, Aberystwyth, 2014; ISBN 978-1-4947-3303-2) 688 pages.

In addition, he is the author of some 56 refereed journal articles, 20 book chapters, and over 150 other articles. The works are in the fields of constitutional law, legal history and ecclesiastical law.

Sources[edit]

References[edit]

Websites[edit]