Nokia Lumia Icon

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Nokia Lumia Icon
Brand Nokia
Manufacturer Nokia
Series Lumia
Compatible networks

2.5G GSM/GPRS/EDGE – 850, 900, 1800, 1900 MHz
2.5G CDMA 1xRTT/1x-Advanced - 800, 1900 MHz
3G UMTS/DC-HSPA+ – 850, 900, 1900, 2100 MHz
3G CDMA Ev-DO Rev. A - 800, 1900 MHz

4G LTE Rel. 8 (UE Cat 3) – 700, 800, 900, 1800, 2100, 2600 MHz
First released February 20, 2014[1]
Related Nokia Lumia 1520
Nokia Lumia 930
Type Touchscreen smartphone
Form factor Bar
Dimensions 137 mm (5.4 in) H
71 mm (2.8 in) W
9.8 mm (0.39 in) D
Weight 167 g (5.9 oz)
Operating system Windows Phone 8
CPU 2.2 GHz quad core Qualcomm 800
GPU Qualcomm Adreno 330
Memory 2 GB RAM
Storage 32 GB internal flash and 7 GB free in SkyDrive
Battery Integrated 2420 mAh Li-poly battery with Qi wireless charging
Data inputs Multi-touch capacitive touchscreen, Gyroscope, Magnetometer, proximity sensor, 3D-Accelerometer
Display 5 in (130 mm) FHD HD AMOLED, 1920 x 1080 pixels at 441 ppi, 16:9 aspect ratio, Color depth 24 bit, 16M colors, 60Hz refresh rate, ClearBlack display, Sunlight Readability Enhancement (SRE), High Brightness Mode (HBM), Super-sensitive capacitive touch enables interacting with the display with gloves and long fingernails, 2.5D Corning Gorilla Glass 3
Rear camera 20 MP PureView with Carl Zeiss Tessar lens and dual LED flash, Wide angle, f/2.4, 26 mm True 16:9 optics, 1/2.5 inch sensor, Optical Image stabilization (OIS),
1080p video capture @ 30 fps with LED for video
Front camera 1.2 MP wide angle, f/2.4,
720p video capture @ 30fps
Connectivity
Other Talk time: Up to 16.4 hours
Standby time: Up to 432 hours (approx. 18 days)
Website Nokia Lumia Icon

Nokia Lumia Icon is a high-end smartphone developed by Nokia that runs Microsoft's Windows Phone 8 operating system. It was announced on February 12, 2014, as a Verizon-exclusive and became available in the United States on February 20, 2014.[2][3] It is currently exclusive to the U.S. market, its international counterpart is the Nokia Lumia 930.

Primary features[edit]

The primary features of the Lumia Icon are:[4]

Availability[edit]

The phone was released for sale exclusively through Verizon in the United States for $199.99 with a 2-year contract or $549.99 with no contract.[6] The Lumia Icon has almost identical internal specifications to the larger Nokia Lumia 1520 with the primary difference being that it has a smaller screen of 5 inches compared with the Lumia 1520's 6 inches.[1] Nokia Lumia 930 has nearly identical specifications but powered with Windows Phone 8.1 and may be fairly considered as its worldwide version.

Naming[edit]

While in development, the Nokia Lumia Icon was known by its model number. Early development screenshots and prototype accessories referred to the phone as the Lumia 929.[7][8] This was in keeping with Nokia's previous branding practice of assigning a corresponding number to the place where the phone would sit in Nokia's lineup, with higher numbers indicating higher-end models and lower numbers indicating lower-end products. Upon release, the phone kept the model number 929, but was the first Lumia to utilize a name other than its model number for branding.[9][10]

Reception[edit]

The Lumia Icon received fairly positive reviews, with some reviewers calling it the best Windows Phone released, praising the phone's camera quality, display, and overall speed but detracting its being locked to one carrier and having a camera with a slow transition time between taking photographs. Reviewers were split on the design of the phone, with some praising its metal build quality as solid and premium, and others criticizing it for being too utilitarian and conservative.[1][6][11][12]

Brad Molen of Engadget called the Lumia Icon "the solid high-end Windows Phone that we've wanted for a long time. It has an amazing display, great performance and solid imaging capability, but its exclusivity to Verizon will severely limit its appeal."[6] and Mark Hachman of PCWorld said "If you’re an app fiend, you’d still be better off buying an iPhone or Android phone, which dependably receive third-party apps. But the Icon and Lumia 1520 are clearly the best Windows Phones on the market. Deciding between them simply depends on which size you prefer."[11] Christina Bonnington from Wired said that the best Windows Phone ever still disappoints, and mentioned poor call quality as one of the detractors, but praised the solid build quality, inclusion of wireless charging, and powerful processor.[13]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Rubino, Daniel (Feb 12, 2014). "Nokia Lumia Icon Review". Mobile Nations. Retrieved 23 February 2014. 
  2. ^ Fedewa, Joe (Feb 12, 2014). "Nokia Lumia Icon for Verizon officially announced". Winsource.com. Retrieved 23 February 2014. 
  3. ^ T., Nick (Feb 12, 2014). "Nokia Lumia Icon for Verizon is finally announced". Phonearena.com. Retrieved 23 February 2014. 
  4. ^ "Nokia Lumia Icon". Nokia. Retrieved 23 February 2014. 
  5. ^ "Technobuffalo Lumia Icon Review". Retrieved 19 March 2014. 
  6. ^ a b c Molen, Brad (Feb 19, 2014). "Nokia Lumia Icon review: a big step forward for Windows Phone". Engadget.com. Retrieved 23 February 2014. 
  7. ^ Sabri, Sam (Feb 4, 2014). "Leaked: Nokia Lumia Icon cases (that you can't buy yet from Verizon)". Mobile Nations. Retrieved 23 February 2014. 
  8. ^ "Verizon-bound Nokia Lumia 929 leaks in high-res photos". GSMarena.com. Nov 4, 2014. Retrieved 23 February 2014. 
  9. ^ Geddes, James (Dec 17, 2013). "Verizon Nokia Lumia 929 to be first Lumia to drop number name, launch as Lumia Icon". IT Tech Post. Retrieved 23 February 2014. 
  10. ^ "Lumia 929 for Verizon to be called ‘Icon’ and delayed to Q1 2014". Windowsphonearena.com. Dec 18, 2013. Retrieved 23 February 2014. 
  11. ^ a b Hachman, Mark (Feb 20, 2014). "Nokia Lumia Icon review: The best Windows Phone so far". PCworld.com. Retrieved 23 February 2014. 
  12. ^ Smith, Sherri (Feb 12, 2014). "Nokia Lumia Icon Review". Laptopmag.com. Retrieved 23 February 2014. 
  13. ^ The Best Windows Phone Ever Still Disappoints | Product Reviews | Wired.com