Nomura Holdings

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Nomura Holdings, Inc.
野村ホールディングス株式会社
Type Holding Company
(Public)
Traded as TYO: 8604
OSE: 8604
NSE: 8604
SGX: N33
NYSENMR
Industry Financial Services
Financial Management Consulting
Founded Osaka, Japan (December 25, 1925 (1925-12-25))
Headquarters 1-9-1, Nihonbashi, Chuo, Tokyo, Japan
Area served Worldwide
Key people Koji Nagai
(Group CEO)[1][2][3]
Nobuyuki Koga
(Chairman)[1][2]
Products Financial Services[4]
Securities Services
Retail banking
Investment Management
Investment Banking
Asset management
Revenue Steady ¥1,385 billion (FY 2010)[5]
Operating income Decrease ¥1,130 billion(FY 2010)[5]
Net income Decrease ¥28.661 billion(FY 2010)[5]
AUM Increase ¥24,743 billion(FY 2010)[5]
Total assets Increase ¥36,693 billion(FY 2010)[5]
Total equity Decrease ¥2,091 billion (FY 2010)[5]
Subsidiaries Nomura Securities Co., Ltd.
Nomura Asset Management Co., Ltd.
The Nomura Trust & Banking Co., Ltd.
Website www.nomura.com
The headquarters of Nomura in Tokyo, Japan.

Nomura Holdings, Inc. (野村ホールディングス株式会社) is a Japanese financial holding company, and a principal member of the Nomura Group. It, along with its broker-dealer, banking and other financial services subsidiaries, provides investment, financing and related services to individual, institutional and government customers on a global basis with an emphasis on securities businesses.[6]

In October 2008, the company acquired Lehman Brothers Holdings's investment banking and equities unit in Asia and Europe and kept on most of its employees. Nomura paid $225 million for the purchase of Lehman's Asian-Pacific unit.[7] Due to big losses, the shares dropped to their lowest level in nearly 37 years in mid-September 2011, Nomura will cut around 5 percent of its staff in Europe – as many as 300 people.[8]

History[edit]

Origins to 2001[edit]

The history of Nomura begins on December 25, 1925, when the Nomura Securities Co., Ltd. (NSC) was established in Osaka, as a spin-off from Securities Dept. of Osaka Nomura Bank Co., Ltd (the present day Resona Bank). NSC initially focused on the bond market.[9][10][10] It was named after its founder Tokushichi Nomura II, a wealthy Japanese stockbroking tycoon. He had earlier established Osaka Nomura bank in 1918, based on the Mitsui zaibatsu model with a capital of ¥10 million.[11] Like the majority of Japanese conglomerate, or zaibatsu, its origins were in Osaka, but today operates out of Tokyo. NSC gained the authority to trade stock in 1938, and went public in 1961.

2001 to present[edit]

On October 1, 2001 Nomura adopt a holding company structure and Nomura Holdings, Inc. was established.[12][13] Nomura made most of its profits in the Japanese retail banking market, but has expanded its international investment banking capabilities. Instinet Incorporated was acquired in February 2007.

In October 2008, Nomura acquired most of Lehman Brothers Asian operations together with its European equities and investment banking units to make one of the world's largest independent investment banks with Y20,300bn (£138bn) assets under management. In April 2009, the global headquarters for investment banking was moved out of Tokyo to London as part of a strategy to move the company's focus from Japan to global markets.

Nomura sponsors research at Oxford University into mathematical techniques for use in finance including stochastic analysis, option pricing, stochastic optimal control, interest rate modelling and through the Nomura Centre for Mathematical Finance

Nomura Holdings and Member companies[edit]

Nomura Holdings, Inc. is the holding company of the Nomura Group and the group's principal member.[14][15] As a keiretsu, Nomura Holdings, Inc. does not directly run member companies, rather it keeps a controlling stake of cross shareholdings and manages financial assistance among member companies which help to deflect hostile takeovers.

Core Members[edit]

Marketing and branding[edit]

The marketing slogan of Nomura is "Connecting Markets East & West".[17]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]