Non-Custodial Parents Party (Equal Parenting)

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The Non-Custodial Parents Party (Equal Parenting) (originally known as the Non-Custodial Parents Party) is a small Australian political party.[1] The party has members in all states and territories of Australia. It supports less government control of many aspects of daily family life. In particular, it puts forward a number of policies seeking changes in the areas of family law and child support.

The party is registered with the Australian Electoral Commission as a political party [2]

Platform[edit]

The party’s web-site states that the core policies centre on the issue of family law reform, emphasising legislative changes in order to enshrine a child's natural rights to a meaningful relationship with both parents, and legal and procedural changes to ensure that the Child Support system is fair, equitable and aimed at fulfilling its primarily goal, that being to support the children.

The policies are primarily aimed at assisting non-custodial parents, grandparents and spouses of non-custodial parents.[3] This is particularly with respect to those parents who have either not been granted contact with their children or who have been adversely affected by the child support legislation.

History[edit]

Formation[edit]

The Non-Custodial Parents Party (Equal Parenting) was formed in Australia in 1998 by Andrew Thompson and other concerned citizens.[4] The original name of the Party was the Non-Custodial Parents Party. The party was registered with the Australian Electoral Commission (AEC) as a political party on 12 January 1999.[5][6] Andrew Thompson remains the Party Secretary and the Registered Officer of the Party.[7] John Flanagan became the Deputy Registered Officer of the Party in 2003.[8]

1999 NSW State Election[edit]

The Non-Custodial Parents Party was originally registered at both the New South Wales State level and at the Federal level. The NCPP ran 22 candidates in the 1999 NSW State Election [9][10]

There were two candidates for the NSW Legislative Council, Andrew Thompson and Angela Flynn.[11]

There were also 20 candidates that nominated for the NSW Legislative Assembly: viz. in Bathurst,[12] Baulkham Hills,[13] Camden,[14] Campbelltown,[15] Coffs Harbour,[16] Fairfield,[17] Hawkesbury,[18] Illawarra,[19] Kogarah,[20] Liverpool,[21] Londonderry,[22] Macquarie Fields,[23] Mulgoa,[24] Murray-Darling,[25] Parramatta,[26] Penrith,[27] Pittwater,[28] Port Jackson,[29] Rockdale [30] and Southern Highlands.[31]

The NSW State registration was subsequently allowed to lapse after the 1999 NSW State Elections.[32][33] This was primarily because the NSW State Electoral Commission uses an optional preferential voting system. Also, state electoral commissions in Queensland, Tasmania and the ACT use an optional preferential voting system [34] for the Legislative Assembly.

Optional preferential voting negates the political impact of small parties such as the NCPP. Whereas smaller political parties such as the NCPP have more of an impact if the preferential voting is compulsory [35]

Federal registration was retained because the Australian Electoral Commission uses the compulsory preferential voting system for the Federal Elections.[36]

Federal Elections[edit]

Since the 1999 NSW State Election, the Non-Custodial Parents Party has provided candidates for all federal elections. The Non-Custodial Parents Party has fielded candidates in the 2001, 2004, 2007 and 2010 Federal Elections and also ran a candidate in a 2002 Cunningham Federal By-Election.[37]

2001 Federal election[edit]

The NCPP fielded eight candidates in the 2001 Federal Election. This included two Senate candidates for New South Wales: Andrew Thompson and Annette McKeegan.[38] There were also six candidates for seats for the House of Representatives: in Bennelong,[39] Eden-Monaro,[40] Lindsay,[41] Macarthur,[42] Parramatta [43] and Richmond.[44] All seats were based in NSW.

2002 Federal Cunningham By-Election[edit]

In 2002, the Non-Custodial Parents Party contested the 2002 Federal By-Election for the then vacant Federal seat of Cunningham (near Wollongong). John Flanagan ran for the NCPP and received 556 votes, representing 0.83% of the total vote[45]

2004 Federal Election[edit]

In the 2004 Federal Election, the NCPP fielded candidates in states other than in New South Wales for the first time. The party fielded eight Senate candidates – two candidates each in New South Wales,[46] Victoria,[47] Queensland [48] and Western Australia.[49] The eight Senate candidates received a total of 12,207 votes, representing 0.10% of the national vote.< [50]

The NCPP also contested two New South Wales House of Representatives seats: Cunningham [51] and Parramatta.[52] The candidates netted 1,132 first preference votes, representing 0.01% of the national vote[53] and 0.03% of the NSW votes.[54]

2006 Deregistration and Re-Registration[edit]

In 2006, the Australian Electoral Commission de-registered all minor political parties. The NCPP was one of the nineteen (19) minor political parties de-registered [55]

This was because the AEC had considered that the names of some of the minor parties were becoming too similar to those of the larger parties. Therefore it was decided by the AEC that the names of all minor political parties were to be reviewed in a "blanket" de-registration process [55][56]

This review did not directly affect the Non-Custodial Parents Party as any conflict with another party's name was never an issue. However the temporary de-registration did provide an opportunity for the NCPP to consider a name change.

As part of the re-registration process, the Executive of the NCPP subsequently requested that the name of the party be changed from the Non-Custodial Parents Party to the present name of the Non-Custodial Parents Party (Equal Parenting) - abbreviated to NCPP(EP). This was done to better reflect the party's emphasis on the issue of equal parenting as one of its key issues.[57]

On 28 August 2007, the AEC re-registered the party under the new name.[58]

2007 Federal Election[edit]

In the 2007 federal election the NCPP(EP) ran eight Senate candidates. The States contested were again New South Wales,[59] Victoria,[60] Queensland [61] and Western Australia [62] – with two candidates in each state. Nationally the party received 6,385 first preference votes, or 0.05% of total vote.[63]

The NCPP(EP) also contested two House of Representatives seats in the 2007 Federal Elections. They were Cunningham [64] and Macarthur.[65] Both seats were located in New South Wales. The candidates received 795 first preferences votes representing 0.01% of the national vote[66] and 0.02% of the New South Wales vote.[67]

2010 Federal Election[edit]

The NCPP(EP) contested the 2010 Federal Election. The Party had two Senate candidates: Andrew Thompson and Roland Foster.[citation needed] The party received 3,616 votes representing 0.09% of the total New South Wales votes.[68] and 0.03% of the national vote.[69]

There were also two House of Representatives candidates. They were for the seat of Cunningham [70] and for the adjacent seat of Throsby.[71] The seats contested for the 2010 Federal Election were all in New South Wales. The two House of Representatives candidates received 2,835 representing 0.02% of the Australian vote.[72][73]

Body State Seat Votes Percentage - Division Percentage -State Percentage -National
House of Representatives NSW Cunningham 1,240 1.39 0.07 0.02
House of Representatives NSW Throsby 1,595 1.91 0.07 0.02
Senate (2 candidates) NSW 3,616 0.09 0.03

2013 Federal election[edit]

The party fielded candidates at the 2013 federal election.[74] The party has been involved in Glenn Druery's Minor Party Alliance.[75][76]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Non-Custodial Parents Party (Equal Parenting). Home Page. Date accessed 26 March 2013
  2. ^ Australian Electoral Commission’s current Index of Registered Political Parties. Date accessed 16 December 2010
  3. ^ Family Law and Child Support Policy and the overall Policies of the Non-Custodial Parents Party (Equal Parenting). Date accessed 16 December 2010
  4. ^ Non-Custodial Parents Party (Equal Parenting). Home Page. Date accessed 26 March 2013.
  5. ^ Australian Electoral Commission’s registration requirements for Federal political parties. Date accessed 16 December 2010
  6. ^ Australian Electoral Commission’s original date of registration of the Non-Custodial Parents Party . Date accessed 16 December 2010
  7. ^ Australian Electoral Commission’s details for the Registered Officer of the Non-Custodial Parents Party (Equal Parenting). Date accessed 16 December 2010
  8. ^ Australian Electoral Commission’s details for the Deputy Registered Officer of the Non-Custodial Parents Party (Equal Parenting). Date accessed 16 December 2010.
  9. ^ New South Wales Electoral Commission – 1999 Legislative Assembly results. http://www.elections.nsw.gov.au/past_results/state_elections/1999_legislative_assembly_results
  10. ^ New South Wales Electoral Commission – 1999 Legislative Council results http://www.elections.nsw.gov.au/results/state_elections_-_legislative_council/1999/1999_lc_group_totals
  11. ^ New South Wales Parliamentary Library. NSW Elections 1999. http://www.parliament.nsw.gov.au/prod/parlment/publications.nsf/0/C398DE6924CABAD5CA256ECF000AF112/$File/LA1999AntonyGreen.pdf Date accessed 30 March 2013
  12. ^ Electoral Commission of NSW. 1999 State Election Results for Bathurst. Date accessed 16 December 2010.
  13. ^ Electoral Commission of NSW. 1999 State election results for Baulkham Hills. Date accessed 16 December 2010
  14. ^ Electoral Commission of NSW. 1999 State election results for Camden. Date accessed 16 December 2010
  15. ^ Electoral Commission of NSW. 1999 State election results for Campbelltown. Date accessed 16 December 2010
  16. ^ Electoral Commission of NSW. 1999 State election results for Coffs Harbour. Date accessed 16 December 2010
  17. ^ Electoral Commission of NSW. 1999 State election results for Fairfield. Date accessed 16 December 2010
  18. ^ Electoral Commission of NSW. 1999 State election results for Hawkesbury. Date accessed 16 December 2010
  19. ^ Electoral Commission of NSW. 1999 State election results for Illawarra. Date accessed 16 December 2010.
  20. ^ Electoral Commission of NSW. 1999 State election results for Kogarah. Date accessed 16 December 2010.
  21. ^ Electoral Commission of NSW. 1999 State election results for Liverpool. Date accessed 16 December 2010.
  22. ^ Electoral Commission of NSW. 1999 State election results for Londonderry. Date accessed 16 December 2010
  23. ^ Electoral Commission of NSW. 1999 State election results for Macquarie Fields. Date accessed 16 December 2010
  24. ^ Electoral Commission of NSW. 1999 State election results for Mulgoa. Date accessed 16 December 2010
  25. ^ Electoral Commission of NSW. 1999 State election results for Murray-Darling. Date accessed 16 December 2010
  26. ^ Electoral Commission of NSW. 1999 State election results for Parramatta. Date accessed 16 December 2010
  27. ^ Electoral Commission of NSW. 1999 State election results for Penrith. Date accessed 16 December 2010.
  28. ^ Electoral Commission of NSW. 1999 State election results for Pittwater. Date accessed 16 December 2010
  29. ^ Electoral Commission of NSW. 1999 State election results for Port Jackson. Date accessed 16 December 2010
  30. ^ Electoral Commission of NSW. 1999 State election results for Rockdale. Date accessed 16 December 2010
  31. ^ Electoral Commission of NSW. 1999 State election results for Southern Highlands. Date accessed 16 December 2010
  32. ^ Electoral Commission of NSW. 1999 State election results for the Legislative Council
  33. ^ Electoral Commission of NSW. 1999 State election results for the Legislative Assembly. Date accessed 16 December 2010
  34. ^ Electoral Commission of NSW. Optional preferential system of voting. Date accessed 16 December 2010
  35. ^ Antony Green's Election Blog. Preferential Voting in Australia. Dated 12 May 2010. Date accessed 16 December 2010
  36. ^ Australian Electoral Commission AEC Compulsory Voting. Date assessed 2 April 2013
  37. ^ Australian Electoral Commission. The 2002 Cunningham Federal By-Election Results. Date accessed 26 March 2013
  38. ^ Australian Electoral Commission AEC 2001 Federal Election – Senate candidates. Date assessed 2 April 2013
  39. ^ Australian Electoral Commission. Results for Bennelong in the 2001 Australian Federal Election. Date accessed 26 March 2013
  40. ^ Australian Electoral Commission. Results for Eden-Monaro in the 2001 Australian Federal Election. Date accessed 26 March 2013
  41. ^ Australian Electoral Commission. Results for Lindsay in the 2001 Australian Federal Election. Date accessed 26 March 2013
  42. ^ Australian Electoral Commission. Results for Macarthur in the 2001 Australian Federal Election. Date accessed 26 March 2013
  43. ^ Australian Electoral Commission. Results for Parramatta in the 2001 Australian Federal Election. Date accessed 26 March 2013
  44. ^ Australian Electoral Commission. Results for Richmond in the 2001 Australian Federal Election. Date accessed 26 March 2013
  45. ^ "Cunningham 2002 by-election |". Australian Electoral Commission. 2013. Retrieved 31 March 2013. 
  46. ^ Australian Electoral Commission. Senate results for New South Wales in the 2004 Australian Federal Election. Date accessed 16 December 2010
  47. ^ Australian Electoral Commission. Senate results for Victoria in the 2004 Australian Federal Election. Date accessed 16 December 2010
  48. ^ Australian Electoral Commission. Senate results for Queensland in the 2004 Australian Federal Election. Date accessed 16 December 2010
  49. ^ Australian Electoral Commission. Senate results for Western Australia in the 2007 Australian Federal Election. Date accessed 16 December 2010
  50. ^ "Senate State First Preferences By Group". Australian Electoral Commission. 2005. Retrieved 31 March 2013. 
  51. ^ Australian Electoral Commission. The 2004 Australian Federal Election Results for Cunningham. Date accessed 16 December 2010
  52. ^ Australian Electoral Commission. The 2004 Australian Federal Election Results for Parramatta. Date accessed 16 December 2010
  53. ^ "First Preferences By Party-National". Australian Electoral Commission. 2005. Retrieved 31 March 2013. 
  54. ^ "NSW First Preferences By Party". Australian Electoral Commission. 2005. Retrieved 31 March 2013. 
  55. ^ a b Australian Electoral Commission’s media release dated 22 December 2006 [1]. Date accessed 30 March 2013
  56. ^ Australian Electoral Commission Information on the de-registration of the political parties without parliamentary representation. Date accessed 16 December 2010
  57. ^ Non-Custodial Parents Party (Equal Parenting). Home Page. Date accessed 30 March 2013
  58. ^ Australian Electoral Commission. Details of re-registration of the Non-Custodial Parents Party (Equal Parenting). Date accessed 16 December 2010
  59. ^ Australian Electoral Commission. Senate results for New South Wales in the 2007 Australian Federal Election. Date accessed 16 December 2010
  60. ^ Australian Electoral Commission Victoria Senate results for Victoria in the 2007 Australian Federal Election. Date accessed 16 December 2010
  61. ^ Australian Electoral Commission. Senate results for Queensland in the 2007 Australian Federal Election. Date accessed 16 December 2010
  62. ^ Australian Electoral Commission. Senate results for Western Australia in the 2007 Australian Federal Election. Date accessed 16 December 2010
  63. ^ "Senate State First Preferences By Group". The official election results 2007. 2008. Retrieved 31 March 2013. 
  64. ^ Australian Electoral Commission. The 2007 Australian Federal Election Results for Cunningham. Date accessed 16 December 2010
  65. ^ Australian Electoral Commission. The 2007 Australian Federal Election Results for Macarthur. Date accessed 16 December 2010
  66. ^ "First Preferences By Party". Australian Electoral Commission. 2008. Retrieved 31 March 2013. 
  67. ^ "First Preferences By Party |". Australian Electoral Commission. 2008. Retrieved 31 March 2013. 0.02 
  68. ^ "Senate Results - New South Wales - 2010 Federal Election". ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation). 2013. Retrieved 31 March 2013. 
  69. ^ "Senate State First Preferences By Group". Australian Electoral Commission. 2013. Retrieved 31 March 2013. 
  70. ^ Australian Electoral Commission. Profile of the Division of Cunningham for the 2010 Federal Election. Date accessed 16 December 2010
  71. ^ Australian Electoral Commission. Profile of the Division of Throsby for the 2010 Federal Election. Date accessed 16 December 2010
  72. ^ "Party Totals - 2010 Federal Election". ABC News. 2013. Retrieved 31 March 2013. 
  73. ^ "First Preferences By Party". Australian Electoral Commission. 2013. Retrieved 31 March 2013. 
  74. ^ Non-Custodial Parents Party (Equal Parenting). 2013 Federal Election and candidates' page. Date accessed 26 March 2013.
  75. ^ Bitter dispute erupts over Senate preferences in Queensland: ABC 5 September 2013
  76. ^ Alliance of micro parties boosts odds for likes of One Nation or Shooters and Fishers gaining Senate spot through preferences: Daily Telegraph 5 September 2013

http://www.elections.nsw.gov.au/past_results/state_elections/1999_legislative_assembly_results

See also[edit]

External links[edit]