Nonene

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
1-Nonene
1-nonene.svg
1-nonene-chemical-formula-c-9-h-18-skeletal.png
Names
IUPAC name
Non-1-ene
Other names
alpha-Nonene
Identifiers
124-11-8 N
ChEBI CHEBI:77443 N
ChemSpider 29025 YesY
Jmol-3D images Image
PubChem 31285
Properties
C9H18
Molar mass 126.24 g/mol
Hazards
NFPA 704
Flammability code 3: Liquids and solids that can be ignited under almost all ambient temperature conditions. Flash point between 23 and 38 °C (73 and 100 °F). E.g., gasoline) Health code 0: Exposure under fire conditions would offer no hazard beyond that of ordinary combustible material. E.g., sodium chloride Reactivity code 0: Normally stable, even under fire exposure conditions, and is not reactive with water. E.g., liquid nitrogen Special hazards (white): no codeNFPA 704 four-colored diamond
Except where noted otherwise, data is given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C (77 °F), 100 kPa)
 N verify (what isYesY/N?)
Infobox references

Nonene is an alkene with the molecular formula C9H18. Many structural isomers are possible, depending on the location of the C=C double bond and the branching of the other parts of the molecule. Industrially, the most important nonenes are trimers of propene. This mixture of branched nonenes is used in the alkylation of phenol to produce nonylphenol, a precursor to detergents, which are also controversial pollutants.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.ehs.neu.edu/laboratory_safety/general_information/nfpa_hazard_rating/documents/NFPAratingJR.htm
  2. ^ Helmut Fiege, Heinz-Werner Voges, Toshikazu Hamamoto, Sumio Umemura, Tadao Iwata, Hisaya Miki, Yasuhiro Fujita, Hans-Josef Buysch, Dorothea Garbe, Wilfried Paulus "Phenol Derivatives" in Ullmann's Encyclopedia of Industrial Chemistry 2002, Wiley-VCH, Weinheim.doi:10.1002/14356007.a19_313.