Nonsense mutation

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In genetics, a nonsense mutation is a point mutation in a sequence of DNA that results in a premature stop codon, or a nonsense codon in the transcribed mRNA, and in a truncated, incomplete, and usually nonfunctional protein product. It differs from a missense mutation, which is a point mutation where a single nucleotide is changed to cause substitution of a different amino acid. Some genetic disorders, such as thalassemia and DMD, result from nonsense mutations.

Simple example[edit]

    DNA: 5' - ATG ACT CAC CGA GCG CGA AGC TGA - 3'
         3' - TAC TGA GTG GCT CGC GCT TCG ACT - 5'
   mRNA: 5' - AUG ACU CAC CGA GCG CGA AGC UGA - 3'
Protein:      Met Thr His Arg Ala Arg Ser Stop

Suppose that a nonsense mutation was introduced at the fourth triplet in the DNA sequence (CGA) causing the cytosine to be replaced with thymine, yielding TGA in the DNA sequence. Since TGA is transcribed-then-translated as UGA, the resulting transcript and protein product would be:

    DNA: 5' - ATG ACT CAC TGA GCG CGA AGC TGA - 3'
         3' - TAC TGA GTG ACT CGC GCT TCG ACT - 5'
   mRNA: 5' - AUG ACU CAC UGA GCG CGU AGC UGA - 3'
Protein:      Met Thr His Stop

The remaining codons of the mRNA are not translated into amino proteins because the stop codon is prematurely reached during translation. This can yield a truncated abbreviated protein product, which quite often lacks the functionality of the normal, non-mutant protein.

Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay[edit]

Despite an expected tendency for premature termination codons to yield shortened polypeptide products, in fact the formation of truncated proteins does not occur often in vivo. Many organisms—including humans and lower species, such as yeast—employ a nonsense-mediated mRNA decay pathway, which degrades mRNAs containing nonsense mutations before they are translated into nonfunctional polypeptides.

The three stop codons have been given names: UAG is amber, UGA is opal (sometimes also called umber), and UAA is ochre. “Amber” was named by discoverers Richard Epstein and Charles Steinberg after their friend Harris Bernstein, whose last name means “amber” in german.[1] The other two stop codons were named “ochre” and “opal” in order to keep the “color names” theme. Stop codons are also called “termination”or “nonsense” codons. They signal release of the nascent polypeptide from the ribosome because there is no cognate tRNA that has anticodons complementary to these stop signals, and so a release factor binds to the ribosome instead.

Pathology associated with nonsense mutations[edit]

Selection of notable mutations, ordered in a standard table of the genetic code of amino acids.[2] Nonsense mutations are marked by red arrows.

Nonsense mutations can cause a genetic disease by damaging a gene responsible for a specific protein, for example, dystrophin in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The same disease may, however, be caused by other kinds of damage to the same gene. Examples of diseases in which nonsense mutations are known to be among the causes include:

An experimental drug known as PTC124 may be useful in treating some cases of each of the above diseases (that is, the cases caused by a nonsense mutation). PTC124 was scheduled to enter the final phase of clinical trials in 2007.[3]

See also[edit]

External links and references[edit]

  1. ^ Edgar B (October 2004). "The genome of bacteriophage T4: an archeological dig". Genetics 168 (2): 575–82. PMC 1448817. PMID 15514035. 
  2. ^ References for the image are found in Wikimedia Commons page at: Commons:File:Notable mutations.svg#References.
  3. ^ Henderson, Mark (23 April 2007). "Daily pill to beat genetic diseases". The Times (London). Retrieved 2007-10-23.