Nordic Chess Championship

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The first Nordic Chess Championship (Nordiska Schackkongressen) took place in Stockholm in 1897.[1][2][3]

Winners[edit]

The winners in the Nordic Championship in 1934 and 1936, Aron Nimzowitsch and Erik Lundin, got the Nordiske kongresmestre title, as the champion 1930, Erik Andersen, defended his title with 3-3 against Gideon Ståhlberg at Copenhagen 1934 and lost it by 2½-3½ against Erik Lundin at Copenhagen 1937.

Several of the Nordic Championship have been arranged as part of an open tournament, where the best placed player from a Nordic country becomes Nordic Champion even if that person did not win the event. For example, the Nordic Champion of 2011, Jon Ludvig Hammer, finished fifth in the Reykjavik Open that doubled as the Nordic Championship since the four players who finished ahead of him were from Ukraine, the Netherlands, and Poland and were thus ineligible for the Nordic Champion title.

# Year City Nordic champion
1 1897 Stockholm  Sven Otto Svensson (Sweden)
2 1899 Copenhagen  Jørgen Møller (Denmark)
3 1901 Göteborg  Jørgen Møller (Denmark)
4 1903 Kristiania  Johannes Giersing (Denmark)
5 1905 Stockholm  A. H. Pettersson (Sweden)
6 1907 Copenhagen  Paul Saladin Leonhardt (German Empire)
7 1909 Göteborg  Milan Vidmar (Austria)
8 1912 Stockholm  Alexander Alekhine (Russian Empire)
9 1916 Copenhagen  Paul Johner (Switzerland)
10 1917 Kristiania  Gustaf Nyholm (Sweden)
11 1919 Göteborg  Rudolf Spielmann (Austria)
 Anton Olson (Sweden)
12 1924 Copenhagen  Aron Nimzowitsch (Denmark)
13 1928 Oslo  Karl Berndtsson (Sweden)
14 1929 Göteborg  Gideon Ståhlberg (Sweden)
15 1930 Stockholm  Erik Andersen (Denmark)
16 1934 Copenhagen  Aron Nimzowitsch (Denmark) *)
*) 1934 Copenhagen  Erik Andersen (Denmark)
17 1936 Helsinki  Erik Lundin (Sweden) *)
*) 1937 Copenhagen  Erik Lundin (Sweden)
18 1938 Örebro  Gideon Ståhlberg (Sweden)
19 1939 Oslo  Gideon Ståhlberg (Sweden)
 Erik Lundin (Sweden)
20 1946 Copenhagen  Osmo Kaila (Finland)
21 1947 Helsinki  Eero Böök (Finland)
22 1948 Örebro  Baldur Möller (Iceland)
23 1950 Reykjavík  Baldur Möller (Iceland)
24 1953 Esbjerg  Friðrik Ólafsson (Iceland)
25 1955 Oslo  Bent Larsen (Denmark)
26 1957 Helsinki  Olof Sterner (Sweden)
27 1959 Örebro  Svein Johannessen (Norway)
28 1961 Reykjavík  Ingi R. Johannsson (Iceland)
29 1963 Odense  Bjørn Brinck-Claussen (Denmark)
 Manne Joffe (Sweden)
30 1965 Oslo  Freysteinn Thorbergsson (Iceland)
31 1967 Hangö  Ragnar Hoen (Norway)
32 1969 Lidköping  Ole Jakobsen (Denmark)
33 1971 Reykjavík  Friðrik Ólafsson (Iceland)
34 1973 Grenå  Bent Larsen (Denmark)
35 1975 Sandefjord  Sejer Holm (Denmark)
36 1977 Kiljava  Lars-Erik Pettersson (Sweden)
37 1979 Sundsvall  Christer Niklasson (Sweden)
38 1981 Reykjavík  Knut Jøran Helmers (Norway)
39 1983 Esbjerg  Curt Hansen (Denmark)
40 1985 Gjøvik  Simen Agdestein (Norway)
41 1987 Tórshavn  Margeir Petursson (Iceland)
42 1989 Espoo  Simen Agdestein (Norway)
43 1992 Östersund  Simen Agdestein (Norway)
44 1995 Reykjavík  Curt Hansen (Denmark)
45 1997 Reykjavík  Jóhann Hjartarson (Iceland)
46 1999 Copenhagen  Tiger Hillarp Persson (Sweden)
47 2001 Bergen  Artur Kogan (Israel)
 Evgeny Agrest (Sweden)[4]
48 2003 Aarhus  Evgeny Agrest (Sweden)
 Curt Hansen (Denmark)[5]
49 2005 Vammala  Evgeny Agrest (Sweden)[6]
50 2007 Copenhagen  Emanuel Berg (Sweden)[7]
51 2009 Copenhagen  Peter Heine Nielsen (Denmark)[8]
52 2011 Reykjavík  Jon Ludvig Hammer (Norway)[9]
53 2013 Køge  Axel Smith (Sweden)[10]

References[edit]