Norfolk Academy

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Norfolk Academy
Norfolk Academy
ου πολλα αλλα πολυ
Not quantity, but quality
Address
1585 Wesleyan Drive
Norfolk, Virginia, United States
Information
Type Private, Co-ed
Established 1728
Headmaster Dennis Manning
Enrollment 1200 students in 1–12
Campus 70 acres (28 ha)
Color(s) Orange, Blue, White
Athletics conference TCIS
Mascot Bulldog
Endowment $39 million
Website

Norfolk Academy is an independent co-educational day school in Norfolk, Virginia. Chartered in 1728, it is the oldest secondary school in Virginia and the eighth oldest in the United States. In 1966, Norfolk Academy merged with Country Day School for Girls in Virginia Beach, Virginia to create the current co-educational school.

The school fosters competitive sports, competing in the Tidewater Conference of Independent Schools (TCIS). Males compete in the Virginia Preparatory League (VPL) and females in the League of Independent Schools (LIS).

History[edit]

Norfolk Academy
Norfolk Academy 1840.jpg
Norfolk Academy, 420 Bank Street, c.1840
Norfolk Academy is located in Virginia
Norfolk Academy
Location 420 Bank St., Norfolk, Virginia
Coordinates 36°51′6″N 76°17′7″W / 36.85167°N 76.28528°W / 36.85167; -76.28528
Area 0 acres (0 ha)
Built 1840 (1840)
Governing body Private
NRHP Reference # 69000343[1]
VLR # 122-0018
Significant dates
Added to NRHP November 12, 1969
Designated VLR September 9, 1969[2]

Norfolk Academy was first located on Bank Street in downtown Norfolk, now its accessible via Charlotte Street and St. Paul's Boulevard. The building was designed by Thomas Ustick Walter, who was later the fourth architect of the U.S. Capitol, designing its dome. The Greek-revival building, featured on the school's current seal (at right), was modeled after the Temple of Thesus in Athens. Subsequently, the building would serve as a military hospital during the American Civil War, a Red Cross building in World War I and from 1920-1970 as the City of Norfolk's Juvenile and Domestic Relations Court, and from 1973 as the City of Norfolk's Chamber of Commerce.[3][4]

The historic academy building was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1969.[1]

Academics and Student Life[edit]

The Academy attempts to maintain high standards, both academic and ethical, for students and faculty. Norfolk Academy students are also known for their matriculation to top colleges and universities.[5]

Students are required to research, compose, and deliver to the student body and faculty an original persuasive speech as a graduation requirement. Public Speaking skills are integrated into the curriculum from the 1st grade on.

Norfolk Academy’s German program was recognized in 2007 as the number one German program in the country among high schools. The College Board recognition for the school and German program has been earned, as the Report notes, through the performance of students on the AP German Language Exam. The ongoing exchange with the Copernicus Gymnasium, Löningen (Germany) has been in place since 1973. This exchange is the longest-running high school student exchange program between the two countries.

In 2011, Norfolk Academy established The Center for Civic and Global Leadership to prepare students to become principled civic leaders. Central to that mission is a commitment to public purpose and service—to recognize and help address the challenges members of our community and across the globe now face. Norfolk Academy was one of just three schools in the nation to receive a coveted largest grant that the Edward E. Ford Foundation extends, which will help fund support for this significant educational initiative, designed to help Norfolk Academy students learn about complex, real world issues, and make a lasting difference in their community. The Center for Civil and Global Leadership has already created four-year programs such as the Chesapeake Bay Fellowship Program, the Global Health Fellowship Program, and the International Relations Fellowship Program where students venture beyond the classroom, conduct their own research, build leadership, and travel internationally in the context of their program.[6]

The school offers a significant array of international educational experiences, and is a member of the School Year Abroad program and the World Leading Schools Association. Formal school partnerships and exchange programs include: Copernicus Gymnasium in Loningen, Germany (since 1973); St. Dominique in Paris, France; Holy Trinity School in Mar del Plata, Argentina; and Beijing No. 101 in China.

Norfolk Academy's Honor Code requires everyone in the school community to pledge not to lie, cheat, or steal. At the end of each graded assignment, students write the statement "I pledge that I have acted honorably in the completion of this assignment" and then sign their name. Honor infractions in for seventh through twelfth grades are handled by the Middle and Upper Schools' respective honor councils, which consist of elected students and is supervised by faculty.

Athletics[edit]

Norfolk Academy conducts a comprehensive athletic program featuring 74 interscholastic competition for grades 7 – 12. Teams compete in the Tidewater Conference of Independent Schools, the League of Independent Schools, and the Virginia Prep League. New facilities include an Athletic Pavilion complex complete with fitness center containing cardio-vascular and weight-training equipment as well as a multi-use field house that has over 20,000 square feet (1,900 m2). Other facilities include the Burroughs and Conrad gymnasiums, the Neff Athletic Training Room, the Vaughan Aquatic Center, the Metro Information Services Tennis Complex, the Watson Baseball Field, the Rixey Lacrosse Field, a 400-meter latex track, and nine additional playing fields.

Norfolk Academy's Men's Soccer Team was often ranked in 2008 as one of the best teams in the country.[7]

Fine Arts[edit]

The John Tucker Jr. Fine Arts Center was completed in 2006 and provides facilities including multiple Dance Studios, Art Studios, a choral room, band room, orchestra room, rooms designated for private music lessons, a Digital Editing lab,and the new Samuel Johnson Theater which provides seating for 575 in the audience including balcony and box seats.

Norfolk Academy offers private lessons in piano, guitar, harp, violin, and several other instruments for all grade levels. Offerings for more experienced musicians include jazz band, chorus, orchestra (strings), band, and harp ensemble. Lessons are offered in ballet and jazz. A dance team is also present, with practices held after school. Evening classes in modern, ballet, and African dance are also offered at Norfolk Academy.

Many arts courses are offered such as Art History, Film I & II, Music Theory, The History of Cinema, and Studio Art, along with the music and dance lessons also offered.

The popular winter musical and other productions are held throughout the year by the Academy Players as drama performance skills and stage crafts are taught (as well as through theater/film courses).

Clubs and Activities[edit]

Approximately fifteen Upper School organizations offer students opportunities for planning, leadership, teamwork, and service. Students may join up to three organizations. Each organization must perform a community service project to benefit the community at large. In the spring the executive officers of the Student Council review the progress of each group and vote whether to recharter the organization for the following year.

The Happy Club at Norfolk Academy, which raises awareness and funds for Operation Smile, was the first high-school club supporting the organization – followed by over 600 other Operation Smile student clubs nationwide.

Organizations other than clubs include Student Council, Honor Council, the school newspaper The Belfry, and the JETS Math, Science, and Engineering Team, which in 2010 tied for 1st place in the state and 10th in the nation (with Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology).

Notable Alumni[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2010-07-09. 
  2. ^ "Virginia Landmarks Register". Virginia Department of Historic Resources. Retrieved 19 March 2013. 
  3. ^ "Chamber puts 170-year-old Norfolk building up for sale". The Virginian Pilot, 2008,. "The building, based on the Greek Temple of Thesus in Athens, was designed by Thomas Ustick Walter, the man who later designed the dome of the U.S. Capitol. Along with its use as a school, the building served as a military hospital during the Civil War, and a Red Cross building in World War I. Around 1920, Norfolk used it for roughly 50 years as the city's Juvenile and Domestic Relations Court." 
  4. ^ Virginia Historic Landmarks Commission Staff (July 1969). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory/Nomination: Norfolk Academy". Virginia Department of Historic Resources.  and Accompanying photo
  5. ^ Matriculation Info
  6. ^ [1]
  7. ^ Norfolk Academy's Men's Soccer Team info
  8. ^ Weingardt, Richard, "Engineering Legends: Great American Civil Engineers : 32 Profiles of Inspiration and Achievement", 2005, Pages 124–125
  9. ^ Special to the New York Times, comp. "Capt. Miles Dead; Wrote Navy Song." The New York Times Oct 8, 1956. Print.
  10. ^ http://www.courts.state.va.us/courts/circuit/norfolk/home.html
  11. ^ Fiveash info

Coordinates: 36°52′27.58″N 76°11′34.14″W / 36.8743278°N 76.1928167°W / 36.8743278; -76.1928167