Norm Mager

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Norm Mager
Norm Mager.jpg
No. 33
Forward
Personal information
Born (1926-03-23)March 23, 1926
Died March 17, 2005(2005-03-17) (aged 78)
Boynton Beach, Florida
Nationality American
Listed height 6 ft 5 in (1.96 m)
Listed weight 185 lb (84 kg)
Career information
High school Lafayette (Brooklyn, New York)
College CCNY (1947–1950)
NBA draft 1950 / Round: 5
Selected by the Baltimore Bullets
Career history
1950–1951 Baltimore Bullets
Stats at Basketball-Reference.com

Norman Clifford "Norm" Mager (March 23, 1926 – March 17, 2005) was an American basketball player who played in the National Basketball Association for the Baltimore Bullets during the 1950-51 NBA season. Mager is also notable as a key member of the 1949–50 CCNY Beavers men's basketball team, the only team in NCAA history to win both the National Invitation Tournament and NCAA tournament in the same year.

Mager, a 6'5 forward from Lafayette High School in Brooklyn, was a senior during the 1949–50 season. He averaged 3.6 points per game during the season, but had a strong postseason, averaging 12.6 points per game in the 1950 NCAA tournament and was named to the All-Eastern regional team. He was also important in the Beavers' NIT run, averaging 4.7 points per game.[1]

Following the close of his collegiate career, Mager was drafted in the fifth round of the 1950 NBA Draft by the Baltimore Bullets. Mager played 22 games for the Bullets, averaging 4.6 points and 2.0 rebounds per game. However, his career came to a premature end in the wake of the CCNY Point Shaving Scandal, where it was revealed that members of the Beavers had taken money to manipulate the outcome of several games. Mager was thrown out of the NBA and other members of the CCNY team were banned for life from the league.[2]

Mager later became an executive with a janitorial supply company, retiring in 2000. He died of cancer on March 17, 2005 in Boynton Beach, Florida.

References[edit]

  1. ^ [1], accessed July 29, 2011
  2. ^ Richard Goldstein (March 23, 2005). "Norman Mager, 78, Player Tarnished by Gambling Scandal, Dies". New York Times. Retrieved July 29, 2011.