Norm Provan

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Norm Provan
Personal information
Full name Norman Douglas Sommerville Provan
Nickname Sticks
Born (1932-12-18) 18 December 1932 (age 82)
Urana, New South Wales
Playing information
Height 193 cm (6 ft 4 in)
Weight 99 kg (15 st 8 lb)
Position Second-row
Club
Years Team Pld T G FG P
1951–65 St. George 256 63 1 0 191
Representative
Years Team Pld T G FG P
1954–61 New South Wales 19 4 0 0 12
1954–60 Australia 14 7 0 0 21
Coaching information
Club
Years Team Gms W D L W%
1962–65 St. George 81 66 2 13 81
1968 St. George 24 14 3 7 58
1975 Parramatta 25 12 1 12 48
1978–79 Cronulla-Sutherland 50 31 2 17 62
Total 180 123 8 49 68
Source: NRL Stats, RLP and Yesterday's Hero

Norm "Sticks"[1] Provan (born 18 December 1932) is an Australian former rugby league footballer and coach. A giant of a man, he was a second-row forward with the St. George Dragons during their 11-year consecutive premiership-winning run from 1956 to 1966. Named amongst the nation's finest footballers of the 20th century, he was a representative in the Australian national team from 1954 to 1960 earning 14 Test and 2 World Cup cups.

Club career & player-coach[edit]

His first junior football was played for North Sydney but after his family relocated to the St George/Sutherland region, Provan played with the Sutherland Woronora Juniors [2] and the Sutherland Gravediggers. [3] He was graded by St George in 1950 after having being turned down by Easts the prior year. Having won the premiership in 1949, St George slipped to a fifth place finish in 1950 but things were falling into place that year with the move to Jubilee Oval, Frank Facer's move from player to club selector and committeeman and Provan's arrival.

Provan featured in their 1951 campaign - a loss in the final against Manly for 3rd place; a 2nd place in the minor premiership in 1952 and a semi-final exit to North Sydney; and then the 1953 Dragons side that lost the 1953 final to South Sydney. St George and Souths would battle head-to-head on many more occasions in Provan's illustrious career.

Provan's strength at second row in attack and in defence, in partnership with Harry Melville, Harry Bath and Monty Porter laid the foundations in those first years of their glory run. After the retirement of Ken Kearney in 1962 from the playing arena, and given the Dragons administrators' preference for a player-coach, Provan took over as captain-coach and the club's dominant run continued.

A fitness fanatic himself, Provan continued Kearney's punishing and successful training routine giving Dragon sides of the period confidence that they could edge out their fatiguing opposition in the final twenty minutes of each encounter. [3] Provan set high standards for himself and his players directing a training mix that included sandhill running at Cronulla; lap running at Kogarah and touch-football. He was content to maintain a certain distance from the team and saw the captain-coach role as a tough, solitary role requiring him to stand slightly apart from his players. A teetotaller later in life, Provan occasionally shared a drink in the shed after a match but he would rarely finish the first beer.[3]

Provan holds the club record of 284 games for St George achieved between 1951 and 1965.[4] He played in the first ten of their run of premiership victories – as captain-coach for four – and made 30 finals appearances for the club over fifteen consecutive seasons. His last game before retirement was a victory in the 1965 Grand Final where the Dragons beat the Rabbitohs 12–8 in front 78,065 which stands as the Sydney Cricket Ground's all-time attendance record.[5]

Representative career[edit]

In 1954 Provan first represented for New South Wales and that same year made his Test debut, playing in all three matches of the 1954 series against the visiting Great Britain side commencing a representative second-row partnership with Wests Kel O'Shea that would continue for a number of years.

Provan was selected for the 1956 Kangaroo tour. Due to injury he missed the Ashes series against Great Britain but appeared in three Tests against France at the end of the tour. He appeared in 15 other minor matches on the tour. In 1957 he was a member of Australia's victorious World Cup squad.

He continued his Test pairing with Kel O'Shea in all three games of the domestic 1958 series against Great Britain and in 1959 featured in all three Tests against the visiting Kiwis. Also in 1959 Provan played in the New South Wales loss to Queensland that attracted 35,261 spectators, smashing Brisbane's previous record for an interstate match of 22,817.[6]

Family priorities and business commitments caused him to cut short his representative career starting with the 1959 Kangaroo tour and he made his final national appearance in the 1960 series against France.

Provan is listed on the Australian Players Register as Kangaroo No. 310.[7]

The Gladiators[edit]

Norm Provan and Arthur Summons with the Winfield Cup trophy at the 1991 Grand Final

In 1963 Provan and Arthur Summons were immortalised one of the most memorable sporting images ever captured in Australia, John O'Gready's award winning photo 'The Gladiators' which later became the model for the NSWRL premiership Winfield Cup trophies from 1982 to 1995 the NRL trophy since 1998.

The 1963 NSW Rugby League Premiership Grand Final between long term rivals Western Suburbs and St George was played in a torrential downpour on Saturday, 24 August. This, combined with the centre cricket pitch area of Sydney Cricket Ground being notoriously muddy in such conditions, ensured that the players were saturated and caked in mud from head to toe. At the conclusion of the hard fought match won by St George, the captains of the teams, the towering Provan and more diminutive Summons, embraced in appreciation of each other's stoic efforts. The moment, captured by a newspaper photographer John O'Gready and published in the following day's Sun-Herald captured an essential element of rugby league wherein a little man can evenly compete against a bigger man and the sporting respect and camaraderie that follows epic struggle. Subsequently the image won several awards and became known as The Gladiators.

Non-playing coach[edit]

After retiring from playing he went on to coach. He was a non-playing coach for St George for a season in 1968 and with the Parramatta Eels for a single season in 1975. Under his stewardship the Eels won the Pre-Season Cup (Wills Cup), the club's maiden first-grade title, and fell one game short of making their first Grand Final appearance.

He had two seasons coaching the Cronulla Sharks in 1978 and 1979 taking them to a 1978 Grand Final loss to Manly.

Records[edit]

He played in finals football in for fifteen consecutive seasons from 1951. His appearance in eleven Grand Finals is an Australian rugby league record. His victory statistic of ten consecutive first-grade premierships is a world record in rugby league and arguably a world class achievement in top-grade team sport.

His brother Peter Provan played alongside him at St George in the 1958 and 1959 Grand Finals and later captained the Balmain Tigers to their 1969 Grand Final victory. Together Norm and Peter are the only brothers to have led differing Australian first-grade rugby league sides to premiership victories.

Accolades[edit]

Norm Provan was awarded Life Membership of the St. George Dragons club in 1963.

In 2004 Provan was admitted into the Australian Rugby League Hall of Fame.[8] In 2007 he was selected by a panel of experts at second-row in an Australian 'Team of the 50s'.[9]

In February 2008, Provan was named in the list of Australia's 100 Greatest Players (1908–2007) which was commissioned by the NRL and ARL to celebrate the code's centenary year in Australia.[10][11] Provan went on to be named in the second-row in Australian rugby league's Team of the Century. Announced on 17 April 2008, the team is the panel's majority choice for each of the thirteen starting positions and four interchange players.[12][13] In 2008 New South Wales announced their rugby league team of the century also and Provan was again named at second-row.[14]

Reflections[edit]

Provan wrote the introduction to the Haddan book The Finals - 100 Years and reflected upon the dressing room mood before the momentous 1965 Grand Final:

References[edit]

  • Writer, Larry (1995) Never Before, Never Again, Pan MacMillan, Sydney
  • Whiticker, Alan & Hudson, Glen (2006) The Encyclopedia of Rugby League Players, Gavin Allen Publishing, Sydney
  • Andrews, Malcolm (2006) The ABC of Rugby League Austn Broadcasting Corpn, Sydney
  • Haddan, Steve (2007) The Finals - 100 Years of National Rugby League Finals, Steve Haddan Publishing, Brisbane
  • Apter, Jeff The Coaches : The Men Who Changed Rugby League (2014), The Five Mile Press Scoresby, Victoria

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ Toby Creswell and Samantha Trenoweth (2006). 1001 Australians You Should Know. Australia: Pluto Press. p. 703. ISBN 9781864033618. 
  2. ^ Haddan p X
  3. ^ a b c Apter The Coaches: The Men Who Changed Rugby League ISBN 9781743465660
  4. ^ Haddan p X
  5. ^ Fitting Farewells, The Sydney Morning Herald, 6 January 2007.
  6. ^ Goodman, Tom (28 May 1959). "Queensland beats N.S.W. in league by 17-15". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 11 December 2011. 
  7. ^ ARL Annual Report 2005, page 54
  8. ^ Australian Rugby League Hall of Fame
  9. ^ AAP (1 August 2007). "Team of the 50s named". The Daily Telegraph (Australia: News Limited). Retrieved 6 October 2010. 
  10. ^ Peter Cassidy (23 February 2008). "Controversy reigns as NRL releases top 100 players". Macquarie National News. Retrieved 23 February 2008. 
  11. ^ "Centenary of Rugby League – The Players". NRL & ARL. 23 February 2008. Retrieved 23 February 2008. 
  12. ^ Todd Balym (17 April 2008). "Johns, Meninga among Immortals". Fox Sports Australia. Retrieved 17 April 2008. 
  13. ^ "Team of the Century Announced". NRL & ARL. 17 April 2008. Retrieved 17 April 2008. 
  14. ^ ARL (2008). "Australian Rugby Football League 2008 Annual Report" (pdf). Australian Rugby Football League Limited. p. 30. Retrieved 19 July 2009. 

External links[edit]

Sporting positions
Preceded by
Ken Kearney
1957–1962
CaptainCoach
St George Dragons

1962–1965
Succeeded by
Ian Walsh
1966–67
Preceded by
Ian Walsh
1966–67
Coach
St George Dragons

1968
Succeeded by
Johnny Raper
1969
Preceded by
Dave Bolton
1974
Coach
Parramatta Eels

1975
Succeeded by
Terry Fearnley
1976
Preceded by
Ted Glossop
1977
Coach
Cronulla Sharks

1978–1979
Succeeded by
Tommy Bishop
1980