Norman Dodd

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Not to be confused with Norman Dodds.

Norman Dodd (June 29, 1899 – January 1987) born in New Jersey, was a banker/bank manager, worked as a financial advisor and served as chief investigator in 1953 for U.S. Congressman B. Carroll Reece Special Committee on Tax Exempt Foundations (commonly referred to as the Reece Committee). He was primarily known for his controversial investigation into tax-exempt foundations.

Norman Dodd was interviewed by the journalist G. Edward Griffin just before he died and an interview documentary was produced as a result which has gained a very wide audience in later years.

Early life[edit]

Norman Dodd was born in New Jersey, he attended private schools, Andover, Massachusetts, and graduated from Yale University. He was, by his own words an indefatigable reader. He worked in manufacturing before devoting himself to banking according to himself. During or after the 1929 stock market crash he was assigned by his superiors the task of restructuring the bank he was working at, after a period of which he recommended what at the time was referred to as "sound banking". He was told that his recommendations would not be considered because his superiors told him that "we will never see sound banking in the United States again".

Tax-exempt Foundations[edit]

His claims about his investigative work have become the cornerstone of theories implicating the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, Ford Foundation, and the Rockefeller Foundation, among others. It was stated by him that these or other foundations were involved in the intentional instigation of the United States into World War I and attempting to mold world history through the explicit control of education in the United States.

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