Norman G. Wann

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Norman G. Wann
Norman G. Wann Ball State.jpg
Wann pictured in Orient 1928, Ball State yearbook
Sport(s) Football, basketball, baseball, tennis, track
Biographical details
Born (1882-07-08)July 8, 1882
Silverwood, Indiana
Died July 23, 1957(1957-07-23) (aged 75)
Eagle Harbor Township, Michigan
Playing career
Football
c. 1905

Earlham
Position(s) Lineman
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
Football
1908–1909
1915–1917
1919–1922
1923–1924
1925
1926–1927
1929–1931

Basketball
1908–1910
1915–1918
1919–1923
1923–1925

Baseball
1909–1910
1916–1918
1920–1921
1927

Ottawa (KS)
Millikin
Millikin
Earlham
Ball Teachers (assistant)
Ball Teachers
City of Detroit


Ottawa (KS)
Millikin
Millikin
Earlham


Ottawa (KS)
Millikin
Millikin
Ball Teachers
Head coaching record
Overall 74–40–10 (football)
128–79 (basketball)
43–39 (baseball)
Statistics
College Football Data Warehouse

Norman Gillespie "Happy" Wann (July 8, 1882 – July 23, 1957) was an American football player, track athlete, coach of multiple sports, and college athletics administrator. He served as the head football coach at Ottawa University in Ottawa, Kansas (1908–1909),[1] Millikin College (1915–1917, 1919–1922), Earlham College (1923–1924), Ball Teachers College, Eastern Division, Indiana State Normal School—now Ball State University (1926–1927), and the College of the City of Detroit—now Wayne State University (1929–1931), compiling a career college football record of 74–40–10. Wann was also the head basketball coach at Ottawa (1908–1910), Millikin (1915–1918, 1919–1923), and Earlham (1923–1925), amassing a career college basketball record of 128–79. In addition, he was the head baseball coach at Ottawa (1909–1910), Millikin (1916–1918, 1920–1921), Ball Teachers College (1927), tallying a career college baseball mark of 43–39.

Wann attended Earlham College, where he played football as a lineman and ran track. He left campus in 1908 one credit short of his BBS degree, which he did not receive until 1922. Earlham served with the American Expeditionary Forces in Europe during World War I. In 1929, he earned a master's degree in physical education from the University of Wisconsin. After his retirement from coaching, he moved to Eagle Harbor Township, Michigan. He died there on July 23, 1957. Three years earlier, in 1954, he was inducted into Earlham's Athletic Hall of Fame. In 1986, he was inducted into the Wayne State University Athletics Hall of Fame.[2]

Head coaching record[edit]

Football[edit]

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs
Ottawa Braves (KIAC) (1908–1909)
1908 Ottawa 3–4
1909 Ottawa 6–1–1
Ottawa: 9–5–1
Millikin Big Blue (Independent) (1915–1917)
1915 Millikin 5–2–1
1916 Millikin 8–0–1
1917 Millikin 7–1
Millikin Big Blue (Independent) (1919–1922)
1919 Millikin 9–0
1920 Millikin 9–0
1921 Millikin 5–2–1
1922 Millikin 3–4–2
Millikin: 47–9–5
Earlham Quakers (Independent) (1923–1924)
1923 Earlham 2–5
1924 Earlham 4–3–1
Earlham: 6–8–1
Ball Teachers Hoosieroons (Independent) (1926–1927)
1926 Ball Teachers 5–1–1
1927 Ball Teachers 5–2–1
Ball Teachers: 10–3–2
City of Detroit Tartars () (1929–1931)
1929 City of Detroit 2–7
1930 City of Detroit 0–9
1931 City of Detroit 0–6–1
City of Detroit: 2–15–1
Total: 74–40–10

References[edit]

  1. ^ "2012 Football Media Guide". Ottawa Braves. p. 7. Retrieved February 26, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Hall of Fame: Norman G. Wann". Wayne State University Athletics. Wayne State University. Retrieved October 31, 2011. 

External links[edit]