Norman Howard Cliff

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Norman Howard Cliff (1925–2007) was a British Protestant Christian author who wrote about Christianity and the history of missionary work in China.

Career[edit]

Cliff was born in Yantai (Chefoo) to a missionary family serving with the China Inland Mission.

Cliff was interned by the Japanese at the Weihsien or Weifang civilian internment camp in 1943. The prisoners at Weihsien were liberated in 1945 by American paratroopers.

He wrote seven books, and a thesis ‘’A History of the Protestant Movement in Shandong Province, China, 1859 to 1951’’. Cliff earned an M.Phil degree at the Open University, and then a Ph. D. at Buckingham University, where he was capped by Lady Margaret Thatcher.

Works authored[edit]

  • Prisoners of the Samurai: Japanese Civilian Camps, 1941-1945
  • Fierce the Conflict (2001)
  • White Cliffs of Hangzhou
  • Life and Theology of Watchman Nee : Including a Study of the Little Flock
  • A Heart for China: The Gripping Story of Benjamin Broomhall
  • A Flame of Sacred Love
  • Courtyard of the Happy Way

References[edit]

  • Broomhall, Alfred (1989). Hudson Taylor and China's Open Century: It Is Not Death To Die. London: Hodder and Stoughton. 

Notes[edit]

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]