Normanhurst Boys' High School

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Normanhurst Boys High School
Normanhurst Boys' High School
Know Thyself
Location
Normanhurst, New South Wales, Australia Australia
Coordinates 33°43′17″S 151°6′5″E / 33.72139°S 151.10139°E / -33.72139; 151.10139Coordinates: 33°43′17″S 151°6′5″E / 33.72139°S 151.10139°E / -33.72139; 151.10139
Information
School type Selective, Public, Single-sex, Day school
Established 1958[1][2]
Principal Mr Mark Anderson
Deputy Principals Ms Asli Harman &
Mr Glen Sawle
Enrolment ~730[2]
Campus Urban
Colour(s)      Red      Black      Yellow
Website

Normanhurst Boys High School (colloquially known as Normo) is an academically selective, public, high school for boys, located in Normanhurst, on the Upper North Shore of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

Established in 1958 and operated by the New South Wales Department of Education and Communities (DEC), the school currently caters for around 730 students from Years 7 to 12.[2] The school, affectionately known as "Normo," celebrated its 50th anniversary in 2008.

History[edit]

In 1957, five schools made up the Hornsby School site, located on the Pacific Highway: a boys' primary school and a boys' junior technical school on the eastern side, and an infants school, a girls’ primary school, and a girls’ domestic science school on the western side.[3] On 30 November 1957, the three western schools were destroyed by bushfires.[3] Over the 1957-58 Christmas holidays, the three schools were relocated into the facilities of the boys' technical school, and the three year groups of boys were moved to a newly built but unopened school at Normanhurst.[3]

From the opening in 1958 until 1993, Normanhurst Boys High School operated as a comprehensive school.[3] In 1993, the Government of New South Wales marked Normanhurst as one of several high schools allowed to select students by academic achievement.[3] The first intake of "selective" students was made up of those starting Year Seven in 1994, with a new intake of Year Sevens each year, until the school became fully selective in 1999.[3] As of 2010, Normanhurst is one of 17 fully selective schools in New South Wales. [4]

Structure[edit]

Normanhurst Boys High School is an academically selective high school and accepts only 120 students in Year Seven, from those who have passed the Selective High Schools Examination in Year Six.[5] Some students may be accepted into Years Eight to Eleven, through direct application to the school.[6]

Facilities[edit]

The school has an area of 6.3 hectares, and is within five minutes walk of Normanhurst railway station.[7]

Sport[edit]

Normanhurst Boys High School comes under the North West Metropolitan Sports Association. The sporting year is divided into summer and winter, and boys are able to select sports they wish to play throughout the semester.[8] Boys can play grade sport, representing the school in inter-school competitions, or social sport, not competing against other schools.[8] The school also holds annual swimming and athletics carnivals,[8] as well as an annual cross-country event.

Co-curricular activities[edit]

Many clubs and societies are on offer to students. These include a debating and public speaking society;[9][10] a chess club;[11] a concert band, a stage band, a jazz ensemble, a vocal ensemble, and a string ensemble.[12] Normanhurst Boys also participates in the Duke of Edinburgh's Award Scheme.[13]

Normanhurst Boys runs an annual school excursion for Year Seven students to Jenolan Caves and the Central West of New South Wales. The excursion has been running for 50 years.[citation needed]

Normanhurst Boys is not far from its "sister" school, Hornsby Girls' High School, with joint curriculum and extra-curricular activities held.[citation needed]

Staff[edit]

  • Principal: Mr M. Anderson
  • Deputy Principal: Ms M. Johnson
  • Deputy Principal: Ms A. Harman

Notable alumni[edit]

Politics, public service and the law
Science, medicine and academia
  • Dr Geoffrey Kiel, Professor of Management at Queensland University;[22]
  • Professor Ian Plimer, geologist and academic[23]
  • Professor Philip Mitchell AM, Scientia Professor of Psychiatry, University of New South Wales.[24]
  • Professor Ian Williamson AM, Professor of Geomatics, University of Melbourne.[25]
Business and industry
  • David Hill, Chairman and CEO of Fox Sports, creator of the Sky Sports channel, former chairman of Fox Broadcasting[26]
  • Graham John Bradley, Chairman Infrastructure NSW; current and former director of numerous companies including Stockland Group and HSBC Bank Australia; former national managing partner of Blake Dawson Waldron.[27]
Entertainment, media and the arts
  • Rowan Cahill, historian, author, journalist, teacher, trade unionist
  • Simon Main, past actor and convicted drug trafficker[28]
  • Peter M. Reeve, International Designer, NIDA Graduate and Director of NIDA Foundation. Honeywell-Bull Arts Fellow, Trustee of The Peggy Glanville Hicks Trust, Board Member Pacific Opera, Sydney Committee Opera Australia, MCA and Sydney Dance Company.
Sport

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Normanhurst Boys High School". School Locator. NSW Public Schools. Retrieved 2008-02-21. 
  2. ^ a b c 2007 Annual Report - Normanhurst Boys High School. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f "History". Normanhurst Boys High School. 2008. Retrieved 9 June 2011. 
  4. ^ "List of selective and agricultural high schools". Department of Education and Training. 14 September 2009. Retrieved 9 June 2011. 
  5. ^ "Year 7". Normanhurst Boys High School. 2008. Archived from the original on 2007-08-29. Retrieved 2008-01-24. 
  6. ^ "Years 8 - 12". Normanhurst Boys High School. 2008. Archived from the original on 2007-08-29. Retrieved 2008-01-24. 
  7. ^ "Welcome to Normanhurst Boys High School". Normanhurst Boys High School. 2008. Retrieved 2008-01-24. 
  8. ^ a b c "Sport Policy". Normanhurst Boys High School. 2008. Archived from the original on 2007-08-29. Retrieved 2008-01-25. 
  9. ^ "Junior Debating and Public Speaking". Normanhurst Boys High School. 2008. Archived from the original on 2007-09-01. Retrieved 2008-01-24. 
  10. ^ "Senior Debating and Public Speaking". Normanhurst Boys High School. 2008. Archived from the original on 2007-09-01. Retrieved 2008-01-24. 
  11. ^ "Chess". Normanhurst Boys High School. 2008. Archived from the original on 2007-08-29. Retrieved 2008-01-24. 
  12. ^ "Music". Normanhurst Boys High School. 2008. Archived from the original on 2007-08-29. Retrieved 2008-01-24. 
  13. ^ "Duke of Edinburgh Award". Normanhurst Boys High School. 2008. Archived from the original on 2007-08-29. Retrieved 2008-01-24. 
  14. ^ Costar, Brian; Curtin, Jennifer (2007-11-06). "Independent federal politician did it his way". Melbourne, Victoria: The Age. p. 11. 
  15. ^ a b c d e "Normanhurst Boys High". School Choice. Archived from the original on 2007-08-30. Retrieved 2008-01-23. 
  16. ^ Wright, Tony (1997-07-19). "The man they couldn't bash out of politics to quit prized Labor seat". The Sydney Morning Herald. 
  17. ^ "Baldwin, the Hon. Peter Jeremy". Parliament of Australia. Retrieved 2007-05-30. 
  18. ^ "Swearing In Ceremony Of The Honourable Ian Gordon Harrison". Supreme Court of New South Wales. 2007-02-12. Retrieved 2008-01-22. 
  19. ^ "FAREWELL CEREMONY OF THE CHIEF JUDGE OF THE LAND AND ENVIRONMENT COURT JUSTICE PETER MCCLELLAN" (PDF). Land and Environment Court of New South Wales. 2005-09-01. Retrieved 2010-12-26. 
  20. ^ "Greens back McClellan appointment". Herald Sun. 11 January 2013. Retrieved 11 January 2013. 
  21. ^ Moran, Susannah (12 January 2013). "Inquiry chief Peter McClellan noted for fairness and experience". The Australian. Retrieved 12 January 2013. 
  22. ^ Who's Who in Australia 1993 page 738
  23. ^ Johnson, Anne (2006-05-28). "The coffin, the Ark & the Prof". The Sunday Mail. 
  24. ^ Who's Who in Australia
  25. ^ Who's Who in Australia
  26. ^ Schulze, Jane (2002-09-26). "Game on - Winning view from the Hill". Canberra, ACT: The Australian. p. B.01. 
  27. ^ Who's Who in Australia
  28. ^ Middap, Christine (2001-12-20). "Former actor jailed for drug trafficking". Brisbane, Queensland: The Courier-Mail. p. 2. 
  29. ^ Wilkins, Phil (1999-11-12). "Players go back to fielding school, hoping to catch on; PAKISTAN TOUR". The Sydney Morning Herald. 

External links[edit]