Avaya ERS 8600

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ERS 8600 System
ERS-8600.JPG
Ethernet Routing Switch 8610
Height: 22.9 in. (58.2 cm)
Width: 17.5 in. (44.5 cm)
Depth: 19.9 in. (50.5 cm)
Weight (empty):
(fully loaded):
85 lb (39 kg)
225 lb (102 kg)
Rack mountable: 19-inch standard rack
Ethernet Routing Switch 8606
Height: 15.8 in. (40.1 cm)
Width: 17.5 in. (44.5 cm)
Depth: 19.9 in. (50.5 cm)
Weight(empty):
(fully loaded):
49 lb (22 kg)
140 lb (63 kg)
Rack mountable: 19-inch standard rack
Certifications
IPv6[1] * JITC'[2]

The Avaya Ethernet Routing Switch 8600 or ERS 8600, previously known as the Passport 8600 or the Accelar 8000, is a modular chassis combination hardware router and switch used in computer networking. The system has been manufactured by Avaya since 2009.[3][4] The system provided the 10G Ethernet equipment backbone for the 2010 Winter Olympics games, providing service for 15,000 VoIP Phones, 40,000 Ethernet connections and supporting 1.8 million live spectators.[5] The system is configurable as a 1.440 Terabit Switch cluster using SMLT and R-SMLT protocols, to provide high reliability[6] cluster failover (normally less than 100 millisecond).[7]

There are three chassis options; a 3-slot chassis most commonly used for access or distribution / aggregation of switches which has a MTBF of 2,043,676hr., a 6-slot chassis for backbones of low density or high space premium environments with a MTBF of 1,341,171hr., and a 10-slot chassis for high availability and high scalability with a MTBF of 1,341,171hr. The chassis can be configured with one or two CPU modules (either the 8691SF or the newer 8692SF modules) and is normally configured with two or three load balancing power supplies.

At the end of 2010, software version 7.1 integrated the Virtual Enterprise Network Architecture (VENA) into the system, thus expanding the capabilities of this product to include network virtualization, cloud computing and IEEE Shortest Path Bridging (IEEE 802.1aq).[8] The system provides connectivity for up to 48 ports, using 10 Gigabit Ethernet, Gigabit Ethernet, 100/10 Megabit Ethernet, or Packet over SONET/SDH

History[edit]

The ERS 8600 is the successor to Nortel's Passport (formerly known as Accelar) 1000-series of routing switches.[9]

Origins[edit]

Rapid City Communications, founded in April 1996,[10] developed the F1200 routing switch in 1997.[11] The main advantage of this product over others at the time was the ASICs on the modules allows the switching and routing of packets to take place on the ASIC chips within each module, instead of having to forward them to a central processing unit (CPU).[12]

Bay Networks[edit]

In June 1997, Bay Networks agreed to acquire Rapid City for $155 million in stock.[13][14] Bay Networks changed the name to the Accelar brand name in 1997.[15] The F1200 was renamed Accelar 1200 and was initially released in January 1998.[16]

Nortel Networks[edit]

When Nortel acquired Bay Networks in 1998, work had already begun on the next-generation routing switch, the 8000 series. A layer 2 version of the 8000 series, known as the Accelar 8100 Edge Switch, premiered in June 1999. In April 2000, the Accelar brand name was retired and the product renamed the Passport 8100. In May 2000, the Passport 8600 Routing Switch was released.[17]

In May 2001, Nortel introduced one of the first 10 gigabit Ethernet switch modules at the N + I convention in Las Vegas.[18]

In 2004, Nortel retired the Passport brand name and renamed the Passport 8600 to Ethernet Routing Switch 8600 (or ERS 8600).[19]

Avaya[edit]

In December 2009, the ERS 8600 was sold to Avaya as part of the Enterprise business unit divestiture.[3] On December 2011 this system completed evaluation and certification by the U.S. Joint Interoperability Test Command (JITC) testing center for use in the United States Department of Defense as an Assured Services Local Area Network (ASLAN).[20][21][22]

Various 8600 Modules
8692SF Switch Faberic Module without a mezzanine card 
8612XLRS 10 Gigabit Ethernet Module (12 fiber ports) 
8648GTR Gigabit Ethernet Module (48 ethernet ports) 
8630GBR Gigabit Ethernet Module (30 fiber ports) 
8608GBE Gigabit Ethernet Module (8 fiber ports) 

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "IPv6 Ready Logo Phase-2". IPv6 Forum. 1 April 2005. Archived from the original on 26 July 2011. Retrieved 2 August 2011. 
  2. ^ "ASVALAN Certification". Defense Information Systems Agency. 18 December 2009. Archived from the original on 16 July 2011. Retrieved 2 August 2011. 
  3. ^ a b "Nortel Completes Sale of Substantially All of Enterprise Solutions Business to Avaya". Nortel Networks. Retrieved 8 February 2012. 
  4. ^
  5. ^
  6. ^ "Ethernet Routing Switch 8600 Technical Specifications". Nortel. Retrieved 4 April 2009. 
  7. ^ Tolly Group Engineers (February 2007). "Evaluation of Resilient Routing Switches for Real-Time Multimedia Traffic with Microsoft Live Communications Server 2005 and Nortel MCS 5100". The Tolly Group. Archived from the original on 25 July 2011. Retrieved 2 August 2011. 
  8. ^
  9. ^ Jim Duffy (1 March 1999). Nortel crafts Catalyst killer. NetworkWorld. p. 1. Retrieved 8 February 2012. 
  10. ^ DAX Associates (2002). Scalable Ethernet Networks for LANs, WANs, & MANs. Information Gatekeepers, Inc. p. 126. Retrieved 25 January 2012. "Rapid City Communications, founded in April 1996, was dedicated to the design, development, and manufacturing of Gigabit Ethernet IP Routing solutions." 
  11. ^ Ben Heskett (19 June 1997). "Bay nabs Gigabit Ethernet maker". CNET News. Archived from the original on 2012. 
  12. ^ DAX Associates (2002). Scalable Ethernet Networks for LANs, WANs, & MANs. Information Gatekeepers, Inc. pp. 121–129. Retrieved 25 January 2012. "All models use a shared memory switch architecture and provide layer 3 & 4 IP routing via ASICs." 
  13. ^ Stephen Lawson (23 June 1997). Bay buys Rapid-City for Gigabit Ethernet wares. Info World. Retrieved 9 August 2011. 
  14. ^ "BAY NETWORKS AGREES TO BUY RAPID CITY COMMUNICATIONS". The New York Times. 20 June 1997. Retrieved 9 August 2011. 
  15. ^ Bates, Regis J.; Kimmel, Zeecil (2000). Nortel Networks Layer 3 Switching. McGraw-Hill. ISBN 0-07-212426-1. 
  16. ^ NetworkWorld (12 January 1998). Bay to ship Gigabit Ethernet switches. NetworkWorld. p. 6. Retrieved 8 February 2012. 
  17. ^ "Product Announcements". Nortel Networks. 26 March 2002. Archived from the original on December 2004. Retrieved 25 January 2012. 
  18. ^ DAX Associates (2002). Scalable Ethernet Networks for LANs, WANs, & MANs. Information Gatekeepers, Inc. pp. 121–129. Retrieved 25 January 2012. "Nortel changed the name of its Accelar switches to Passport. Nortel is one of the first vendors to offer a 10 Gigabit Ethernet switch module, which it introduced in May 2001 at the N + I convention in Las Vegas." 
  19. ^ "Simplifying Nortel Product Names". Nortel Networks. Archived from the original on 29 October 2005. Retrieved 8 February 2012. 
  20. ^ JITC (DoD) (16 December 11). "Special Interoperability Test Certification of the Avaya Ethernet Routing Switch (ERS)5600 Series with Release 6.2.100.073". DISA. Retrieved 20 December 2011. 
  21. ^ "Special Interoperability Test Certification of the Avaya Ethernet Routing Switch (ERS)8800 with Release 7.1.0.100_B068". Retrieved 6 April 2012. 
  22. ^ "Avaya and Joint Joint Interoperability Test Command (JITC)". Avaya. Retrieved 18 April 2012. 

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]