North American Computational Linguistics Olympiad

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The North American Computational Linguistics Olympiad (NACLO) is a computational linguistics competition for high school students in the United States and Canada that has been held since 2007. Around 1000 students participate annually.[1] Since 2008 the contest has consisted of two rounds, the second being administered to the top scorers in the first round. The top-scoring students on the second round qualify for the International Linguistics Olympiad (ILO), one of the international science olympiads.

History[edit]

Since the mid-1960s, problem-solving competitions in linguistics for secondary school students have been taking place at various locations around the world. In Russia, the Moscow and St Petersburg Linguistic Olympiads are credited with inspiring hundreds of young talented scholars to choose linguistics as an academic major and profession. Presently there are national contests in Europe, Asia, South America, Australia and Africa, as well as North America. NACLO is part of a consortium that shares resources with other English-speaking contests such as the United Kingdom Linguistics Olympiad, OzCLO (Australia) and the All-Ireland Linguistics Olympiad. There is also an International Linguistic Olympiad in which students from many countries compete, as well as dozens of local competitions held in individual towns and schools across Europe and the USA.

In 1998 the first US Linguistics Olympiad was held at the University of Oregon in Eugene, Oregon, in 1998. 18 students participated the first year, 88 participated the second year, and 67 participated the third year of this local pilot program. From 2001 to 2006, the program existed as an informal, web-based educational activity known as the Linguistics Challenge.

The two US teams in each year won several awards at the ILO in 2007 and 2008. Each year, one of the two US teams won a gold medal (or first diploma) in the team contest. In addition, several team members won individual medals.[2][3]

Format[edit]

The format of the contest changed significantly between 2007 and 2008. The 2007 contest consisted of eight problems given in a single round open to all participants. The 2008 competition consisted of two rounds. The first round was open to all contestants and consisted of a three-hour, five-problem written examination. The top scorers on the open round advanced to the invitational round, which was a five-hour, seven-problem written examination divided into two parts; the first part lasted 3 and a half hours and contained five problems, while the second part lasted one and a half hour and contained two problems.[4] The top eight scorers from the invitational round were selected to participate in the ILO. The booklets with problems and solutions are available on the main NACLO website.[5]

ILO qualifiers[edit]

From 2007 to 2010 the USA sent two teams annually to the ILO.

2007 - St. Petersburg, Russia[6][7]
Team Name Award Team award Team leader
1 Adam Hesterberg gold medal Dragomir Radev,
Lori Levin
Jeffrey Lim best solution to problem 2
Ryan Musa
Rachel Zax
2 Josh Falk gold medal
Rebecca Jacobs
Michael Gottlieb
Anna Tchetchetkine
2008 - Slantchev Bryag, Bulgaria[8][9]
Team Name Award Team award Team leader
1 Josh Falk silver trophy,
cup for highest average score
on the individual contest
Dragomir Radev,
Lori Levin
Jeffrey Lim bronze medal
Anand Natarajan silver medal
Guy Tabachnick bronze medal
2 Morris Alper silver medal gold trophy
Rebecca Jacobs bronze medal
Jae-kyu Lee best solution to problem 4
Hanzhi Zhu gold medal,
best solution to problem 1
2009 - Wrocław, Poland[10][11]
Team Name Award Team award Team leader
"Red" Morris Alper honorable mention gold trophy Dragomir Radev,
Lori Levin
Alan Huang bronze medal,
best solution to problem 1
Rebecca Jacobs silver medal
Anand Natarajan honorable mention
"Blue" John Berman bronze medal,
best solution to problem 5
Sergei Bernstein bronze medal
Daryl Hansen honorable mention
Vivaek Shivakumar honorable mention
2010 - Stockholm, Sweden[12][13][14]
Team Name Award Team award Team leader
"Red" Ben Sklaroff gold medal,
best solution to problem 4
3rd highest combined individual scores Dragomir Radev,
Lori Levin
Allen Yuan silver medal
In-Sung Na honorable mention
Brian Kong honorable mention
"Blue" Martin Camacho silver medal,
best solution to problem 2
highest combined individual scores
Tian-Yi Damien Jiang silver medal,
best solution to problem 1
Alexander Iriza bronze medal
Alan Chang bronze medal

In 2011 the USA sent three teams, and Canada also sent a team.

2011 - Pittsburgh, USA[15][16][17]
Country Team Name Award Team award Team leader
USA "Red" Aaron Klein bronze medal gold trophy,
highest combined individual scores
Dragomir Radev
Wesley Jones silver medal
Duligur Ibeling silver medal
Morris Alper gold medal,
best solution to problem 2
"White" Erik Andersen honorable mention
Allen Yuan silver medal
Chelsea Voss honorable mention
Arjun Srinivasan honorable mention
"Blue" Alexander Wade silver medal,
best solution to problem 4
Ophir Lifshitz honorable mention
Caroline Ellison honorable mention,
best solution to problem 3
Rachel McEnroe
Canada Keunjae Go Patrick Littell
Jordan Ho
Daniel Mitropolsky bronze medal
William Zhang honorable mention

In 2012, the USA sent two teams, and Canada also sent a team.

2012 - Ljubljana, Slovenia[18][19]
Country Team Name Award Team Award Team leader
USA "Red" Darryl Wu silver medal,
best solution to problem 1
2nd highest combined individual scores Dragomir Radev,
Lori Levin
Anderson Wang gold medal,
best solution to problem 4
Samuel Zbarsky honorable mention
Allan Sadun silver medal
"Blue" Alexander Wade gold medal,
best solution to problem 3,
best solution to problem 5
gold trophy,
3rd highest combined individual scores
Aaron Klein silver medal
Aidan Kaplan
Erik Andersen bronze medal
Canada Simon Huang Patrick Littell
Keunjae Go honorable mention
David Penco
Qin Long

In 2013, the USA sent two teams, and Canada also sent a team.

2013 - Manchester, UK[20]
Country Team Name Award Team Award Team leader
USA Red Aaron Klein silver medal gold trophy,
highest combined individual scores
Dragomir Radev,
Lori Levin
Max Schindler bronze medal
Alexander Wade gold medal
Tom McCoy bronze medal
Blue Rebecca Burks honorable mention
Jeffrey Ling silver medal
Erik Andersen honorable mention
Simone Stoyen
Canada Jordan Ho Patrick Littell
Janis Chang
Daniel Lovsted bronze medal
Stella Lau honorable mention

In 2014, the USA sent two teams, and Canada also sent a team.

2014 - Beijing, China[21]
Country Team Name Award Team Award Team leader
USA "Red" Darryl Wu gold medal,
2nd place individual,
best solution to problem 2
gold trophy,
highest combined individual scores
Dragomir Radev,
Lori Levin
Jackie Bredenberg honorable mention
Alexander Babiak silver medal
Deven Lahoti silver medal
"Blue" Brandon Epstein honorable mention
James Bloxham bronze medal
Kevin Li bronze medal
Catherine Wu silver medal,
best solution to problem 4
Canada Daniel Lovsted gold medal,
3rd place individual
2nd highest combined individual scores Heather Newell
Yan Huang silver medal
Simon Huang bronze medal
Minh-Tam Nguyen honorable mention

References[edit]

See also[edit]