North Carolina Community College System

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North Carolina Community College System
North Carolina Community College System (emblem).png
Established 1963
Type Community college
President Scott Ralls
Academic staff 6,244 [1]
Undergraduates 809,091[2]
Location Statewide, North Carolina, USA
Campus 58 campuses
Website www.nccommunitycolleges.edu

The North Carolina Community College System is a statewide network of fifty-eight (58) public community colleges. Each college has a distinct governance system and policies. In total, the system enrolls over 800,000 students, and is the third largest community college system in the nation.[2] It also provides the North Carolina Learning Object Repository as a central location to manage, collect, contribute, and share digital learning resources for use in traditional or distance learning environments.

History[edit]

In 1957, the North Carolina General Assembly adopted the first Community College Act and provided funding for community colleges.[3] The General Assembly also provided funding to initiate a statewide system of Industrial Education Centers. These centers were to train adults and selected high school students in skills needed by industry. By 1961, there were five public junior colleges emphasizing arts and sciences, and seven industrial education centers focusing on technical and vocational education.

The need to coordinate these two post-high school education systems led Governor Terry Sanford to appoint the Governor's Commission on Education Beyond the High School. In 1962, this commission recommended that the two types of institutions be brought into one administrative organization under the State Board of Education and local boards of trustees. The resulting unified community college system would provide comprehensive post-high school education.[3]

In May 1963, the General Assembly enacted a law establishing a Department of Community Colleges under the State Board of Education. The system celebrated its 25th anniversary in 1988, indicating that 1963 is considered its initiation point.[3]

In the summer of 1981, the system was placed under the authority of a new state Board of Community Colleges.[4]

System presidents[edit]

The North Carolina Community College System has had six presidents, originally called Directors of the Department of Community Colleges:

In addition, Charles R. Holloman served in an acting capacity from September 1978 to July 1979.

Colleges[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ NCCCS (2008). "Faculty and Staff Information". North Carolina Community College System. 
  2. ^ a b NCCCS (2007-10-15). "Curriculum and Continuing Education Student Enrollment by College". North Carolina Community College System. 
  3. ^ a b c NCCCS (2007). "A Matter of Facts: The North Carolina Community College System Fact Book". North Carolina Community College System. 
  4. ^ NCCCS (2007-08-15). "State Board of Community Colleges". North Carolina Community College System. 
  5. ^ NCCCS (2007-12-06). "Scott Ralls named as seventh president of North Carolina Community College System". North Carolina Community College System. 

External links[edit]