North Carolina Highway 105

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NC 105 marker

NC 105
Route information
Maintained by NCDOT
Length: 17.7 mi[1] (28.5 km)
Existed: 1956 – present
Major junctions
South end: US 221 in Linville
  NC 184 in Sugar Mountain
US 221 / US 321 in Boone
North end: US 221 / US 421 / NC 194 in Boone
Location
Counties: Avery, Watauga
Highway system
NC 104 NC 106

North Carolina Highway 105 is a primary state highway in the state of North Carolina. It traverses from the mountain community of Linville to the town of Boone.

Route description[edit]

Southbound NC 105 with overlapping US 221, US 321, and US 421 Truck routes, in Boone
North end of NC 105, in Boone

Constructed about 1956, NC 105 follows the general route of the old ET&WNC "Tweetsie" Railroad connecting Linville to Boone before a major flood washed away many sections of the roadbed in 1940. For the most part the highway was not built on the actual roadbed. Unlike other roads in the area, it was less curvy and made the most direct route to Boone compared to US 221 and NC 194. The highway also doubles as a truck routes for US 221, US 321, and US 421.[1][2]

The first 4 miles (6.4 km) of the highway is two-lane and goes by the gated communities Grandfather Golf & Country Club and Linville Ridge. At the Tynecastle intersection in Linville Gap, it crosses the Eastern Continental Divide and begins to descend into a valley area. On this section of the highway, the south-bound traffic has a passing lane and Trucks are required to drive 45 mph. Once the descent ends, the route briefly passes through the town limits of Seven Devils. Between Seven Devils and Broadstone Road is the unincorporated community of Foscoe. Some of the best views of Grandfather Mountain can be seen at this section of the highway for southbound traffic; it is also notorious for traffic back-ups by travelers trying to stop and visit shops on either side of the road. A brief south-bound passing lane is available near Hound Ears, however drivers typically do not go fast enough to take advantage of the passing zone or slower traffic will stay left causing drivers to pass on the right. Between Broadstone Road and NC 105 Bypass, the highway ascends towards Boone, the north-bound traffic expands to two lanes; probably the least scenic section of the road thanks to a rock quarry and asphalt plant on either side of the road. In Boone, the highway becomes a full four-lane highway for the rest of the route and connects to two major roads: Blowing Rock Road and East King Street.[1][2]

Dedicated and memorial names[edit]

NC 105 has one dedicated or memorialized stretches of freeway.

  • W Ralph Winkler Highway – Official name of highway, from the Avery/Watauga county line to Blowing Rock Road. It is dedicated to Ralph Winkler, who was a member of the State Highway and Public Works Commission in the 1950s.

History[edit]

Established in 1956 as a new primary route between Linville and Boone, it converted the ETWN "Tweetsie" railroad that had discontinued service since a major flood in 1940.[3][4]

Prior to 1956, NC 105 was originally assigned as a primary route from Nebo to Linville Falls in 1926.[5][6] It was then extended in 1929 slightly south to the US 70/NC 10.[7][8] In 1935, the highways was rerouted from Longtown[9] to Morganton; the old route to Nebo was re-branded as NC 105A.[10][11] In 1940, NC 105 was restored to its original route to Nebo, eliminating NC 105-A; the route from Longtown to Morganton was rebannered as NC 126.[12][13] Then finally in 1954, it was decommissioned; NC 126 was extended from Longtown to Nebo, while NC 183 extended over a small section in Linville Falls.[3][14] . . The remaining section, known as "Old NC Highway 105 ", has remained unchanged and is not recommended for vehicles without four-wheel drive. It's rugged and views of the Linville Gorge Wilderness makes it a unique part of the Pisgah Loop Scenic Byway.[15][16]

Future[edit]

Identified by local and state officials as a critical highway in the High Country, that is choked by high truck volumes and seasonal tourist traffic, NCDOT plans to widen 14.6 miles (23.5 km) of NC 105 into a divided four-lane highway from Linville to N.C. 105 Bypass (State Road 1107) in Boone. The project is broken into two sections: section one - Linville to Foscoe and section two - Foscoe to Boone. The estimated cost of the entire project is $103 million. Section two right-of-way acquisition is tentatively to being in May, 2015, with construction tentatively set to begin in March, 2018. No time table regarding section one at this time.[17][18]

Junction list[edit]

County Location Mile[1] km Destinations Notes
Avery Linville 0.0 0.0 US 221 to NC 181 (Newland Highway) – Blowing Rock, Marion, Newland To Grandfather Mountain
Sugar Mountain 4.0 6.4 NC 184 north (Tynecastle Highway) – Banner Elk, Sugar Mountain, Beech Mountain To Lees-McRae College and ski areas
Watauga   12.0 19.3 Broadstone Road – Valle Crucis
Boone 15.0 24.1 NC 105 Bypass
17.0 27.4 US 221 south / US 321 (Blowing Rock Road) – Blowing Rock, Lenoir South end of US 221 overlap; to ASU
17.7 28.5 US 221 north / US 421 / NC 194 (King Street) – Wilkesboro, Todd, West Jefferson North end of US 221 overlap
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi


Bannered routes[edit]

Nebo–Longtown alternate spur[edit]

NC 105A
Location: NeboLongtown, NC
Length: 7.6 mi[19] (12.2 km)
Existed: 1935–1940

North Carolina Highway 105A (NC 105A) was established in 1935, when NC 105 was rerouted on new primary routing along the north bank of Lake James and then southwest into Morganton. In 1940, NC 105 reverted back to its old alignment with Nebo when NC 126 was established; in 1954, it too became part of NC 126.

See also[edit]

Northbound NC 105, in Linville


References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Google Inc. "NC 105". Google Maps (Map). Cartography by Google, Inc. http://maps.google.com/maps?f=d&source=s_d&saddr=N+Carolina+105+N&daddr=N+Carolina+105+N%2FUS-221+N&hl=en&geocode=FahmJgIdmMEe-w%3BFXieKAIdbtQh-w&mra=me&mrcr=0&mrsp=1,0&sz=17&sll=36.214917,-81.66746&sspn=0.006466,0.013937&ie=UTF8&ll=36.146747,-81.727982&spn=0.207095,0.445976&z=12. Retrieved February 1, 2011.
  2. ^ a b North Carolina Department of Transportation (2013). State Transportation Map (Map). Cartography by North Carolina State Tax Commission (2013–14 ed.).
  3. ^ a b North Carolina State Highway Commission (1955). North Carolina (Map). Cartography by North Carolina State Tax Commission (1955 ed.).
  4. ^ North Carolina State Highway Commission (1956). North Carolina (Map). Cartography by North Carolina State Tax Commission (1956 ed.).
  5. ^ North Carolina State Highway Commission (1925). State Highway System of North Carolina (Map). Cartography by North Carolina State Tax Commission (1925 ed.).
  6. ^ North Carolina State Highway Commission (1926). State Highway System of North Carolina (Map). Cartography by North Carolina State Tax Commission (1926 ed.).
  7. ^ North Carolina State Highway Commission (1928). State Highway System of North Carolina (Map). Cartography by North Carolina State Tax Commission (1928 ed.).
  8. ^ North Carolina State Highway Commission (1929). State Highway System of North Carolina (Map). Cartography by North Carolina State Tax Commission (1929 ed.).
  9. ^ "Longtown". Geographic Names Information System, U.S. Geological Survey. Retrieved October 2, 2010. 
  10. ^ North Carolina State Highway Commission (1934). State Highway System of North Carolina (Map). Cartography by North Carolina State Tax Commission (1934 ed.).
  11. ^ North Carolina State Highway Commission (1935). State Highway System of North Carolina (Map). Cartography by North Carolina State Tax Commission (1935 ed.).
  12. ^ North Carolina State Highway Commission (1939). State Highway System of North Carolina (Map). Cartography by North Carolina State Tax Commission (1939 ed.).
  13. ^ North Carolina State Highway Commission (1940). State Highway System of North Carolina (Map). Cartography by North Carolina State Tax Commission (1940 ed.).
  14. ^ North Carolina State Highway Commission (1954). North Carolina (Map). Cartography by North Carolina State Tax Commission (1954 ed.).
  15. ^ "NCDOT: Scenic Byways". Retrieved November 23, 2011. 
  16. ^ Google Inc. "Old NC Highway 105". Google Maps (Map). Cartography by Google, Inc. https://www.google.com/maps/dir/35.9512293,-81.934773/35.7715505,-81.9027218/@35.8022815,-81.9271406,10z/data=!4m9!4m8!1m5!3m4!1m2!1d-81.936827!2d35.8053718!3s0x8850b75fed2ce109:0xef5bb5b2a978a9cb!1m0!3e0?hl=en. Retrieved October 5, 2014.
  17. ^ "NCDOT: NC 105 Widening". Retrieved November 23, 2011. 
  18. ^ "NCDOT: NC 105 Widening Project Map". Retrieved November 23, 2011. 
  19. ^ Google Inc. "North Carolina Highway 105A - Nebo, North Carolina". Google Maps (Map). Cartography by Google, Inc. https://maps.google.com/maps?saddr=Route+126&daddr=State+Hwy+126&hl=en&ll=35.745258,-81.898956&spn=0.120097,0.222988&sll=35.771395,-81.902658&sspn=0.003752,0.006968&geocode=Fe_mIAIdWtod-w%3BFcXTIQIdJUQe-w&mra=dme&mrsp=1&sz=18&t=p&z=13. Retrieved May 13, 2014.

External links[edit]