North Carolina Highway 903

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NC 903 marker

NC 903
Route information
Maintained by NCDOT
Length: 200.0 mi[1] (321.9 km)
Existed: 1934 – present
Major junctions
South end: NC 411 near Garland
  US 421 in Delway
I‑40 / NC 24 near Magnolia
US 70 near La Grange
US 13 / US 258 near Snow Hill
US 264 near Greenville
US 13 / US 64 near Robersonville
US 258 / NC 125 in Scotland Neck
US 301 in Halifax
I‑95 near Weldon
US 158 / NC 4 in Littleton
North end: SR 903 at VA state line
Location
Counties: Sampson, Duplin, Lenoir, Greene, Pitt, Martin, Halifax, Warren
Highway system
NC 902 NC 904

North Carolina Highway 903 (NC 903) is a primary state highway in the U.S. state of North Carolina. It serves as predominantly rural highway in the Inner Banks region and arterial road in and around Greenville. Traveling a total of 200 miles (320 km), in a zigzag through the state, it is believed to be the longest state highway in the United States in the 900-series.

Route description[edit]

NC 903 begins at an intersection with NC 411, east of Garland; where it proceeds to first go north, crossing the Black River, and then east through Delway and Magnolia. Northeast of Magnolia, NC 903 connects with I-40 (exit 373) and begin its first concurrency with NC 24 (one of many concurrences along its route). Traveling along the Kenansville Bypass, a rural expressway, it completely bypasses the city of Kenansville. Reverting back to a two-lane rural highway and switching concurrency with NC 11 and later NC 111, it continues north, crossing the Neuse River, to US 70, in LaGrange. Continuing north, it reaches Snow Hill, where it overlaps briefly with NC 58 and with US 13/US 258. Breaking away from the concurrences, it goes east to Maury and then northeast to Winterville, where it meets-up with NC 11 again.

As NC 903 enters Greenville, the biggest city along its route, it stays completely on Memorial Drive as various highway routes connect on then off it: NC 43, from Greenville Boulevard to Fifth Street; US 13, joins at Dickinson Avenue; and NC 33, from Greene Street to Belvoir Highway. Halfway through the city, it crosses the Tar River. After passing US 264, in the north Greenville area, NC 903 splits northeasterly from US 13/NC 11 to Stokes and then north to Robersonville; which is the first original section of the route. After connecting with US 13 (third and final time) and US 64, NC 903 goes north and merges with NC 125 and travels to Hamilton. Now going in a northwesterly direction, it splits and then reconnects with NC 125 in Scotland Neck, overlapping briefly with US 258 in town. The NC 903/NC 125 combo continues to US 301, in Halifax, where it finally splits going west towards I-95 and then to US 158, bypassing Roanoke Rapids. Sharing one last concurrency with US 158, it breaks north at Lttleton, going through the Lake Gaston area by first crossing the Roanoke River, travels through the community of Elams, then swings west over Songbird Creek and then finally north into Virginia, where it downgrades to secondary state road 903.

History[edit]

NC 903 was established in 1934 as a new primary routing that connected the Stokes community between NC 11 and US 64; the initial route length was 15.6 miles (25.1 km). In 1938, NC 903 was extended north on new routing from US 64 to NC 125.[2] In 1967 or 1968, NC 903 was extended north, overlapping with NC 125 to Hamilton, then on new primary routing to US 258/NC 125, in Scotland Neck.[3]

Around 1972, NC 903 extended northwest along NC 125 to Halifax, then west on new primary routing to I-95. Between 1976-1978, NC 903 made its first extension south, with an overlap with NC 11 through Greenville and Winterville, then replaced NC 91 south to US 70, in LaGrange.[4]

Between 1980-1982, NC 903 was extended west, from I-95, on new primary routing to US 158; it then made its final north extenstion, between 1984-1990, by overlapping US 158 to Littleton and then through the Lake Gaston area to the Virginia state line, south of Ebony. Also during the late 1980s, NC 903 was extended south on new routing from LaGrange to Albertson, then share concurrences with NC 111 and NC 11 to Kenansville, and again new new primary routing connecting I-40 and to end at US 117, in Magnolia.[5]

In 1994 or 1995, NC 903 was extended southwest to its current southern terminus with NC 411, east of Garland. In 2002, NC 903 was moved onto the Kenansville Bypass.[6]

Junction list[edit]

County Location Mile[1] km Destinations Notes
Sampson   0.0 0.0 NC 411 – Garland, Harrells
  7.1 11.4 US 421 – Wilmington, Clinton
Duplin Magnolia 18.9 30.4 US 117 (Monk Street) – Rose Hill, Warsaw
  21.2 34.1 I‑40 / NC 24 west – Wilmington, Benson West end of NC 24 overlap
  24.0 38.6 NC 11 – Greenevers, Kenansville To James Sprunt Community College
  26.1 42.0 NC 50 – Chinquapin, Kenansville
  27.0 43.5
NC 24 east / NC 24 Bus. west – Beulaville, Jacksonville, Kenansville
East end of NC 24 overlap
  28.1 45.2 NC 11 south – Kenansville South end of NC 11 overlap
Kornegay 37.3 60.0 NC 11 north / NC 111 south – Beulaville North end of NC 11 and south end of NC 111 overlap
Albertson 41.5 66.8 NC 111 north – Goldsboro North end of NC 111 overlap
Lenoir Husseys Crossroads 48.6 78.2 NC 55 – Kinston, Seven Springs, Mount Olive
La Grange 55.5 89.3 US 70 – Kinston, Goldsboro
Greene Snow Hill 69.4 111.7 NC 58 south (Kingold Boulevard) – Kinston South end of NC 58 overlap
69.7 112.2 US 13 south / NC 58 north (Kingold Boulevard) – Wilson, Goldsboro South end of US 13 and north end of NC 58 overlap
  70.9 114.1 US 258 south / NC 91 north (Kingold Boulevard) – Snow Hill, Walstonburg South end of US 258 overlap
  73.2 117.8 US 13 / US 258 north – Farmville North end of US 13/US 258 overlap
Maury 76.5 123.1 NC 123 – Hookerton, Farmville
Pitt   83.7 134.7 NC 102 east – Ayden
Winterville 90.3 145.3 NC 11 south (Winterville Parkway) – Kinston South end of NC 11 overlap
Greenville 93.4 150.3
US 264 Alt. / NC 43 south (Greenville Boulevard) – Washington, Wilson
South end of NC 43 overlap
95.4 153.5 US 13 south (Dickinson Avenue) – Washington, Wilson South end of US 13 overlap
96.4 155.1 NC 43 north (Fifth Street) – Rocky Mount North end of NC 43 overlap
99.2 159.6 NC 33 east (Greene Street) – Rocky Mount East end of NC 33 overlap
99.6 160.3 NC 33 west (Belvoir Highway) – Tarboro West end of NC 33 overlap
100.0 160.9 US 264 – Washington, Wilson
100.7 162.1 US 13 (Belvoir Highway) / NC 11 north – Bethel, Williamston North end of US 13/NC 11 overlap
Stokes 107.2 172.5 NC 30 – Washington, Bethel
Martin Robersonville 116.3 187.2
US 64 Alt. – Williamston, Bethel
  117.1 188.5 US 13 / US 64 – Williamston, Tarboro
  122.9 197.8 NC 125 south – Williamston South end of NC 125 overlap
  124.1 199.7 NC 142 west – Hassell
Hamilton 126.8 204.1 NC 125 north – Oak City North end of NC 125 overlap
  130.6 210.2 NC 11 / NC 42 – Oak City, Lewiston-Woodville
Halifax Scotland Neck 145.4 234.0 US 258 / NC 125 south (Main Street) – Tarboro South end of US 258/NC 125 overlap
145.7 234.5 US 258 north (Main Street) – Rich Square North end of US 258 overlap
  155.9 250.9 NC 481 – Tillery, Enfield
  160.3 258.0 US 301 south – Enfield, Rocky Mount South end of US 301 overlap
  162.5 261.5 NC 561 east – Tillery East end of NC 561 overlap
  162.9 262.2 NC 561 west – Brinkleyville, Louisburg West end of NC 561 overlap
Halifax 163.3 262.8
US 301 Bus. (King Street)
164.0 263.9 US 301 north – Weldon North end of US 301 overlap
  164.4 264.6 NC 125 north – Roanoke Rapids North end of US 125 overlap
  169.0 272.0 I‑95 – Roanoke Rapids, Rocky Mount
  174.1 280.2 NC 48 – Roanoke Rapids, Brinkleyville
  179.6 289.0 US 158 east – Roanoke Rapids East end of US 158 overlap
Littleton 186.1 299.5 US 158 west / NC 4 south – Warrenton, Brinkleyville West end of US 158 overlap
Warren State line 200.0 321.9 SR 903 – Ebony
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Google Inc. "North Carolina Highway 903". Google Maps (Map). Cartography by Google, Inc. https://maps.google.com/maps?saddr=NC-903+N&daddr=35.2855781,-77.808343+to:35.5128572,-77.4550024+to:35.7705601,-77.2386369+to:36.0368127,-77.3089259+to:36.3898045,-77.7349928+to:NC-903+N&hl=en&ll=35.708608,-77.519531&spn=1.93132,3.56781&sll=34.949061,-77.96937&sspn=0.060925,0.111494&geocode=FcasEgIdndlU-w%3BFUpqGgIdKb1c-yl10goAOVOpiTHlBDJk1BJs1w%3BFRniHQIdZiFi-ykTSbAGD8SuiTGbPXOVQmE8AQ%3BFcDQIQIdlG5l-ymx0m7yJv2uiTHZ4PkwVKn71Q%3BFczgJQIdA1xk-ylNMr69QFGuiTF3hMkHDlBwjQ%3BFaxDKwIdsNtd-ynZMTQNDhKuiTHlzRIcd80uew%3BFZefLQIdhONZ-w&mra=mrv&via=1,2,3,4,5&t=p&z=9. Retrieved May 19, 2014.
  2. ^ North Carolina Department of Transportation (1940) (PDF). North Carolina Primary Highway System (Map). Cartography by NCDOT. http://dotw-xfer01.dot.state.nc.us/imgdot/DOTStateTravelMapHistoric/STM1940.pdf. Retrieved May 19, 2014.
  3. ^ North Carolina Department of Transportation (1970) (PDF). North Carolina Official Highway Map (Map). Cartography by NCDOT. http://dotw-xfer01.dot.state.nc.us/imgdot/DOTStateTravelMapHistoric/STM1970.pdf. Retrieved May 19, 2014.
  4. ^ North Carolina Department of Transportation (1979) (PDF). North Carolina Official Highway Map (Map). Cartography by NCDOT. http://dotw-xfer01.dot.state.nc.us/imgdot/DOTStateTravelMapHistoric/STM1980.pdf. Retrieved May 19, 2014.
  5. ^ North Carolina Department of Transportation (1990) (PDF). North Carolina Official Highway Map (Map). Cartography by NCDOT. http://dotw-xfer01.dot.state.nc.us/imgdot/DOTStateTravelMapHistoric/STM1990.pdf. Retrieved May 19, 2014.
  6. ^ "Route Change (2002-12-16)" (PDF). North Carolina Department of Transportation. December 16, 2002. Retrieved May 19, 2014. 

External links[edit]