North Carolina Music Hall of Fame

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North Carolina Music Hall of Fame
North Carolina Music Hall of Fame.jpg
Established 1994
Location Kannapolis, North Carolina
Type Music
Director Eddie Ray
Website www.northcarolinamusichalloffame.org

The North Carolina Music Hall of Fame is a non-profit organization and museum that was created to honor musicians, composers and artists with ties to North Carolina that have made significant impact in the music industry. The museum serves as a clearinghouse for North Carolina musicians from all time periods, and preserves a number of memorabilia artifacts for public display.

The museum is currently located at the renovated site of the old Kannapolis, North Carolina, city jail at 109 West A Street.[1]

History[edit]

The organization was founded in 1994 by businessmen Doug Croft and Joe Carroll.[2] Originally located in Thomasville, North Carolina,[3] the group inducted seven people in 1999 and one in 2002.[2] Suffering from a lack of space, a historic city jail in Kannapolis, North Carolina, was chosen as the new location. Full renovation began in 2008, with the museum completed 7 months later in 2009.[4]

Much of the renewed interest in the NC Music Hall of Fame was driven by music industry mogul Mike Curb who has ties to Kannapolis and is friends with David Murdock who was building the Kannapolis-based North Carolina Research Campus. He worked out a deal to buy and renovate the old city jail and police station. Curb also has his close friend and North Carolina native, music executive Eddie Ray, become operations director to oversee the day-to-day for the organization.[2]

Mike Curb and Eddie Ray were both inducted into the Hall in 2009. Mike Curb for his contribution and support of the Hall of Fame and Eddie Ray for his lifetime achievement in the music non-performer category.[5]

In 2012, the organization hosted its first induction ceremony open to the public. Being held at the Vintage Motor Club Conference & Events Center in nearby Concord, North Carolina allowed the group to sell tickets to the event.[6]

Criteria for inclusion[edit]

Musicians that were either born in North Carolina or have made it their home are eligible for induction 10 years after their entry into the music industry. Inductees are not limited to music performers, and producers, industry executives and educators are also eligible for induction.[3]

Inductees[edit]

Some of the inductees include (with year inducted):

Inductees are from virtually every genre of music, including jazz, opera, hip hop and bluegrass.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Contact Us". North Carolina Music Hall of Fame. Retrieved September 10, 2012. 
  2. ^ a b c Ford, Emily (May 22, 2009). "Jailhouse rock: N.C. Music Hall of Fame set to open in old Kannapolis jail". The Salisbury Post. Retrieved September 10, 2012. 
  3. ^ a b c Fisher, Hugh (June 10, 2012). "NC Music Hall of fame celebrates Tar Heel talent". Salisbury Post. Retrieved July 27, 2012. 
  4. ^ "Overview". NCMHF. Retrieved July 27, 2012. 
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s "2009 Inductees". North Carolina Music Hall of Fame. Retrieved September 10, 2012. 
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h "N.C. Music Hall of Fame offers tickets". The Salisbury Post. August 29, 2012. Retrieved September 10, 2012. 
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m "2010 Inductees". North Carolina Music Hall of Fame. Retrieved September 10, 2012. 
  8. ^ a b c d "1999 Inductees". North Carolina Music Hall of Fame. Retrieved September 10, 2012. 
  9. ^ a b c d e f g h "2011 Inductees". North Carolina Music Hall of Fame. Retrieved September 10, 2012. 
  10. ^ "2002 Inductees". North Carolina Music Hall of Fame. Retrieved September 10, 2012. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 35°29′50″N 80°37′31″W / 35.49722°N 80.62528°W / 35.49722; -80.62528