North Carolina Tar Heels

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For the 1920s string band, see The Carolina Tar Heels.
North Carolina Tar Heels
Logo
University University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Conference Atlantic Coast Conference
NCAA Division I
Athletic director Bubba Cunningham
Location Chapel Hill, North Carolina
Varsity teams 27
Football stadium Kenan Memorial Stadium
Basketball arena Dean E. Smith Student Activities Center
Baseball stadium Bryson Field at Boshamer Stadium
Other arenas William D. Carmichael, Jr. Auditorium
Mascot Rameses
Nickname Tar Heels
Fight song I'm a Tar Heel Born
Here Comes Carolina
Colors
     Carolina Blue[1]       White
Website goheels.com

The North Carolina Tar Heels are the athletic teams for the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The name Tar Heel is a nickname used to refer to individuals from the state of North Carolina, the Tar Heel State. The campus at Chapel Hill is referred to as the University of North Carolina for the purposes of the National Collegiate Athletic Association.The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill was chartered in 1789, and in 1795 it became the first state-supported university in the United States.[2] Since the school fostered the oldest collegiate team in the Carolinas, the school took on the nickname "Carolina," especially in athletics. The Tar Heels are also referred to as North Carolina, UNC, or The Heels.[3]

The mascot of the Tar Heels is Rameses, a Bighorn Ram. It is represented as either a live Dorset sheep with its horns painted Carolina Blue, or as a costumed character performed by a volunteer from the student body, usually an undergraduate student associated with the cheer leading team.

Carolina has won 40 NCAA Division I team national championships in seven different sports, ninth all-time, and 51 individual national championships.

Baseball[edit]

  • Head Coach: Mike Fox
  • Stadium: Bryson Field at Boshamer Stadium
  • ACC Championships: 6 (1982, 1983, 1984, 1990, 2007, 2013)
  • College World Series Appearances: 10 (1960, 1966, 1978, 1988, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2011, 2013)

The baseball team has had recent success, reaching the championship series of the College World Series in 2006 and 2007 losing both times to Oregon State. They also appeared in the College World Series in 1960, 1966, 1978, 1989, 2008, 2009, 2011 and 2013.

Men's basketball[edit]

2008 men's basketball players Wayne Ellington, Danny Green, Tyler Hansbrough, Ty Lawson, and Deon Thompson
  • Head Coach: Roy Williams
  • Arena: Dean E. Smith Center
  • Southern Conference Championships: 13 (Tournament: 1922, 1924, 1925, 1926, 1935, 1936, 1940, 1945; Regular Season: 1935, 1938, 1941, 1944, 1946)
  • ACC Championships: 45 (Tournament: 1957, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1972, 1975, 1977, 1979, 1981, 1982, 1989, 1991, 1994, 1997, 1998, 2007, 2008; Regular Season: 1956, 1957, 1959, 1960, 1961, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1971, 1972, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1987, 1988, 1993, 1995, 2001, 2005, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2011, 2012)
  • NCAA National Championships: 6 (1924 (Undefeated), 1957 (undefeated), 1982, 1993, 2005, 2009)
  • Final Four Appearances: 18 (1946, 1957, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1972, 1977, 1981, 1982, 1991, 1993, 1995, 1997, 1998, 2000, 2005, 2008, 2009)
  • Best Final Ranking: No. 1 (Associated Press: 1957, 1982, 1984, 1994, 1998, 2008, 2009; Coaches: 1957, 1982, 1984, 1993, 2005, 2009)
  • ACC/National Players of the Year: 8 (Jack Cobb 1923–26, George Glamack 1938–41, Lennie Rosenbluth 1954–57, Phil Ford 1974–78, James Worthy 1979–82, Michael Jordan 1981–1984, Antawn Jamison 1995–98, Tyler Hansbrough 2005–09)

Carolina has enjoyed long success as one of the top basketball programs in the country. Overall, the Tar Heels have won five NCAA National Championships and were retroactively awarded one by the Helms Foundation.

Under coach Frank McGuire, the team won its first NCAA championship in 1957. After McGuire left, legendary coach Dean Smith established the team as a powerhouse in college basketball. In 31 years at Carolina, Smith set the record for the most wins of any men's college basketball head coach, a record broken in 2007 by Bob Knight. Under Smith, the Tar Heels won two national championships and had numerous talented players come through the program. Smith is also credited with coming up with the four corners offense. More recently, the Tar Heels won the national championship in 2005 and 2009 under coach Roy Williams.

Women's basketball[edit]

Field hockey[edit]

2007 field hockey team with President George W. Bush
  • Head Coach: Karen Shelton
  • Stadium: Henry Stadium
  • ACC Championships: 16 (1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 2004, 2007)
  • National Championships: 6 (1989, 1995, 1996, 1997, 2007, 2009)

Football[edit]

2006 football team playing Virginia Tech
  • Head Coach: Larry Fedora
  • Stadium: Kenan Memorial Stadium
  • Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association Championships: 1 (1895)
  • Southern Conference Championships: 5 (1922, 1934, 1946, 1949)
  • ACC Championships: 5 (1963, 1971, 1972, 1977, 1980)
  • Postseason Bowl Appearances: 30 (1947 Sugar, 1949 Sugar, 1950 Cotton, 1963 Gator, 1970 Peach, 1971 Gator, 1972 Sun, 1974 Sun, 1976 Peach, 1977 Liberty, 1979 Gator, 1980 Bluebonnet, 1981 Gator, 1982 Sun, 1983 Peach, 1986 Aloha, 1993 Peach, 1993 Gator, 1994 Sun, 1995 Carquest, 1997 Gator, 1998 Gator, 1998 Las Vegas, 2001 Peach, 2004 Continental Tire, 2008 Meineke Car Care, 2009 Meineke Car Care, 2010 Music City, 2011 Independence, 2013 Belk)
  • Best Final Ranking: No. 3 (1948 Associated Press)
  • Finished 2012 with 8–4 record but did not make bowl game due to NCAA sanctions.

Men's lacrosse[edit]

Men's lacrosse in the 2009 ACC tournament final.
  • Head coach: Joe Breschi
  • Home fields: Fetzer Field and Kenan Memorial Stadium
  • ACC tournament championships: 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1996
  • ACC regular season championships: 1981, 1982, 1985, 1988, 1991, 1992, 1994, 1996
  • NCAA tournament appearances: 1976, 1977, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1998, 2004, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010
  • NCAA tournament championships: 1981, 1982, 1986, 1991

Women's lacrosse[edit]

  • ACC tournament championships: 1 (2002)
  • NCAA Championship: 1 (2013)

Men's soccer[edit]

  • Head Coach: Carlos Somoano
  • Stadium: Fetzer Field
  • ACC Tournament Championships: 1987, 2000, 2011
  • College Cup Appearances: 1987, 2001, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011
  • NCAA National Championships: 2001, 2011

Women's soccer[edit]

Offensive Player of the Year Yael Averbuch
2006 women's soccer player Robyn Gayle
  • Head Coach: Anson Dorrance
  • Stadium: Fetzer Field
  • ACC Championships: 38 (1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009 Tournament, 1987, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2010 Regular Season)
  • National Championships: 22 (1981 AIAW, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1996, 1997, 1999, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2008, 2009, 2012 NCAA)
  • College Cup Appearances: 26 (1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2006, 2008, 2009, 2012)

Men's golf[edit]

The men's golf team has won 14 conference championships:[4]

Two Tar Heels have won the NCAA individual championship, Harvie Ward in 1949 and John Inman in 1984. Ward also won the British Amateur in 1952 and the U.S. Amateur in 1955 and 1956. The team's best finish was second place in 1953 and 1991.

Tar Heel golfers who have had success at the professional level include Davis Love III (20 PGA Tour wins including 1997 PGA Championship) and Mark Wilson (five PGA Tour wins).

Wrestling[edit]

C.D. Mock, a 1982 Carolina graduate and the first Tar Heels wrestling NCAA Champion (1982), is entering his 11th season as head coach of the University of North Carolina wrestling program. The 2005 and 2006 Atlantic Coast Conference Coach of the Year, Mock was named head coach on Sept. 30, 2002, and assumed the duties of head coach with the retirement of 30-year veteran Bill Lam following the 2002-03 season. C.D. Mock has been achieved two ACC Coach of the Year (2005, 2006) & two ACC Champions (2005, 2006) awards.[5] Though UNC is more known for basketball, the Tar Heel wrestling program has 5 individual NCAA champions: Mock, T.J. Jaworsky, who won 3 back-to-back NCAA title in the 134-pound weight class in 1993-1995, & 1988 NCAA Champion Rob Koll. UNC's best finish during the national championships is 5th in 1982.[6]

Carmichael Arena is currently the home to the Tar Heels Wrestling team located centrally on campus.[7]

Other sports[edit]

2005 men's soccer team playing SMU

Other national championship victories include the women's team handball team in 2004, 2009, 2010, 2011; and the men's handball team in 2004, 2005, and 2006. The men's crew won the 2004 ECAC National Invitational Collegiate Regatta in the varsity eight category. In 1994, Carolina's athletic programs won the Sears Directors Cup which is awarded for cumulative performance in NCAA competition. At least three Carolina wrestlers have won NCAA titles, C.D. Mock, current head coach of the Tar Heels, Rob Koll, now the head wrestling coach at Cornell, and T.J. Jaworsky.

Rugby[edit]

Carolina also fields non varsity sports teams. North Carolina's rugby team competes in the Atlantic Coast Rugby League against its traditional ACC rivals. North Carolina finished second in its conference in 2010, led by conference co-player of the year Alex Lee. North Carolina finished second at the Atlantic Coast Invitational in 2009 and again in 2010. North Carolina has also competed in the Collegiate Rugby Championship, finishing 11th in 2011 in a tournament broadcast live on NBC.[8]

National championships[edit]

North Carolina women's soccer team celebrates winning their 18th NCAA championship in 2006.

North Carolina has won 42 national championships, 40 of which are from the NCAA. UNC women's soccer accounts for 21 of the 40 NCAA national championships.[9] The 40 NCAA Championships ranks ninth all-time, behind only UCLA, Stanford, Southern California, Oklahoma State, Arkansas, LSU, Penn State, and Texas.

  • Men's
    • Basketball – 1924*, 1957, 1982, 1993, 2005, 2009
    • Lacrosse – 1981, 1982, 1986, 1991
    • Soccer – 2001, 2011
  • Women's
    • Basketball – 1994
    • Field Hockey – 1985, 1995, 1996, 1997, 2007, 2009
    • Lacrosse – 2013
    • Soccer – 1981**, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1996, 1997, 1999, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2008, 2009, 2012

(*) Pre-NCAA tournament championship (Helms Foundation) (**) There was only one AIAW soccer tournament, thus making North Carolina the only women's soccer team to win an AIAW championship

Rivalries[edit]

Tip-off of a basketball game against Duke at the Dean Smith Center
See also: Tobacco Road

Carolina's most heated rivalries are with its Tobacco Road counterparts Duke, North Carolina State, and Wake Forest. In recent years, the Carolina-Duke basketball series has attracted the most attention. HBO even made a documentary in 2009 called "Battle for Tobacco Road: Duke vs. Carolina".[10] The Tar Heels also have a rivalry with Virginia in college football, known as the South's Oldest Rivalry. UNC and UVA are the two oldest schools in the Atlantic Coast Conference.

Fight songs[edit]

I'm a Tar Heel Born[edit]

Carolina's main fight song is I'm a Tar Heel Born. It originated in the late 1920s as an add-on (or "tag") to the school's alma mater, "Hark The Sound". Today, the song is almost always played immediately after the singing of "Hark The Sound", even during more formal occasions such as convocation and commencement. Just before home football and basketball games, the song is played by the Bell Tower near the center of campus, and is often played after major victories.[11]

Lyrics[edit]

I'm a Tar Heel born, I'm a Tar Heel bred.
And when I die, I'm a Tar Heel dead.
So it's rah-rah, Car'lina-'lina!
Rah-rah, Car'lina-'lina!
Rah-rah, Car'lina-'lina!
Rah, rah, rah!

Rah, rah, rah! is rarely sung in modern practice, except by older fans. From the 1970s through the early 1990s, it was usually replaced by "Go to hell State!" Since the early 1990s, it has usually been replaced with Go to hell, Duke! However, the State variation was taught at freshman orientation well into the 1990s.

Here Comes Carolina[edit]

Another popular song is Here Comes Carolina. As its title implies, it is most commonly played when a Tar Heel team enters the field of play. Traditionally, the band plays a version of the traditional orchestral warmup tune before launching into the song when the first player charges out of the tunnel. During the warmup tune, fans stand and clap along. The effect is similar to that of a train coming down the track.

For many years at basketball games, the band played the first seven notes of the song in different keys during player introductions, modulating a half step each time before launching into the song in the normal key after the final player was announced.

The last part of the song's melody come from an old revival song, "Jesus Loves the Little Children".

Lyrics[edit]

Here comes Car'lina-lina, here comes Car'lina-lina! We hail from NCU.
We've got the spirit in it, we've got the team to win it. We wear the colors white and blue.
So it's fight, fight, fight for Carolina, as Davie did in days of old.
As we gather 'round the Well, cheer that Tar Heel team like hell for the glory of NCU!

Davie refers to William Richardson Davie, Carolina's founder. The Well refers to The Old Well, a campus landmark. NCU is an antiquated abbreviation for "North Carolina University."

Notable alumni[edit]

Notable graduates from the athletic programs include Michael Jordan from men's basketball, Mia Hamm from women's soccer, Charlie Justice from American football, Davis Love III from golf, B.J. Surhoff from baseball and Marion Jones from women's basketball and track & field.

References[edit]

External links[edit]