North Carolina gubernatorial election, 2012

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North Carolina gubernatorial election, 2012
North Carolina
2008 ←
November 6, 2012 (2012-11-06) → 2016

  Pat McCrory July 2012.jpg Walter Dalton.jpg
Nominee Pat McCrory Walter Dalton
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 2,440,707[1] 1,931,580[1]
Percentage 54.62%[1] 43.23%[1]

Nc gov 2012.png

County results

Governor before election

Bev Perdue
Democratic

Elected Governor

Pat McCrory
Republican

The 2012 North Carolina gubernatorial election took place on November 6, 2012, concurrently with the 2012 U.S. presidential election, U.S. House elections, statewide judicial elections, Council of State elections and various local elections.

Incumbent Democratic Governor Bev Perdue was eligible to run for re-election to a second term. However, she announced on January 26, 2012, that she would not seek re-election. The Democratic nominee was incumbent Lieutenant Governor Walter H. Dalton, the Republican nominee was former Mayor of Charlotte Pat McCrory and the Libertarian nominee was Barbara Howe.

Pat McCrory won the election with almost 55 percent of the vote to Dalton's 43 percent (according to unofficial results), and became the 74th governor of North Carolina in January 2013.

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declined[edit]

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Bruce
Blackmon
Walter
Dalton
Gary
Dunn
Bob
Etheridge
Bill
Faison
Gardenia
Henley
Undecided
Public Policy Polling May 5–6, 2012 500 ± 3.1% 2% 34% 4% 29% 4% 4% 24%
Survey USA April 26–30, 2012 560 ± 4.2% 2% 32% 5% 23% 5% 3% 30%
Public Policy Polling April 27–29, 2012 500 ± 4.4% 3% 36% 2% 26% 5% 3% 25%
Civitas/Survey USA April 20–23, 2012 448 ± 4.7% 3% 32% 3% 27% 4% 2% 27%
Public Policy Polling April 20–22, 2012 500 ± 4.4% 4% 26% 4% 25% 5% 2% 35%
Public Policy Polling March 23–25, 2012 505 ± 4.4% 5% 15% 4% 26% 3% 2% 45%
Public Policy Polling February 29–March 1, 2012 499 ± 4.4% 5% 19% 2% 26% 2% 4% 41%
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Dan
Blue
Walter
Dalton
Bob
Etheridge
Bill
Faison
Mike
McIntyre
Brad
Miller
Richard
Moore
Undecided
Public Policy Polling February 3–5, 2012 400 ± 4.9% 13% 10% 21% 2% 6% 8% 7% 33%
11% 20% 24% 4% 41%
22% 25% 6% 7% 40%
20% 24% 4% 11% 41%
21% 24% 5% 8% 41%
24% 30% 6% 39%

Debates[edit]

A series of televised debates between candidates Dalton, Etheridge and Faison, held April 16–18, was considered potentially pivotal, since "the governor’s race has so far attracted little attention, created little buzz and produced few political commercials" and "polls suggest there is still a large swath of Democratic voters who have yet to decide" for whom to vote.[22] The first debate, conducted by WRAL-TV and broadcast statewide, featured few differences between the candidates, but Faison was seen as the aggressor.[23] The second debate (conducted by UNC-TV) was more contentious, with Dalton criticizing Etheridge's support of a free trade agreement while he was in Congress, and Etheridge attacking Dalton over his attendance record on boards and commissions and his alleged failure to speak out against the actions of the majority-Republican legislature.[24] In the final debate of the series, this one conducted by WNCN-TV and the North Carolina League of Women Voters, candidates were considered to be more "muted" in their criticisms of each other. All three spoke out strongly against a voter ID bill proposed by Republicans in the state legislature. Dalton emphasized modernizing the state's economy, Etheridge continued his themes of leadership and education, and Faison most sharply attacked Republicans and called for action on the state's unemployment problem.[25]

Results[edit]

Democratic primary results[26]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Walter H. Dalton 425,618 45.8%
Democratic Bob Etheridge 353,209 38.0%
Democratic Bill Faison 51,759 5.6%
Democratic Gardenia Henley 48,402 5.2%
Democratic Gary M. Dunn 27,163 2.9%
Democratic Bruce Blackmon 22,158 2.4%
Totals 928,309 100%

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

  • Jim Harney, businessman[27]
  • Scott Jones, businessman[28]
  • Jim Mahan, small businessman and former teacher[29]
  • Pat McCrory, former mayor of Charlotte and 2008 gubernatorial nominee[30]
  • Charles Kenneth Moss,[31] businessman and preacher[32]
  • Paul Wright, trial lawyer; former District Court and Superior Court judge[31]

Declined[edit]

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Jim
Harney
Scott
Jones
Jim
Mahan
Pat
McCrory
Charles
Moss
Paul
Wright
Undecided
Public Policy Polling May 5–6, 2012 496 ± 4.4% 2% 3% 2% 70% 1% 2% 20%
Survey USA April 26–30, 2012 451 ± 4.5% 3% 3% 2% 65% 3% 2% 21%
Public Policy Polling April 27–29, 2012 486 ± 4.4% 4% 2% 2% 66% 0% 2% 24%
Public Policy Polling April 20–22, 2012 521 ± 4.3% 3% 1% 2% 67% 1% 2% 23%
Public Policy Polling March 22–25, 2012 561 ± 4.1% 2% 1% 3% 64% 2% 0% 28%
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Pat
McCrory
More Conservative
Challenger
Other Undecided
Public Policy Polling September 1–4, 2011 400 ± 4.9% 40% 46% 15%
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Phil
Berger
Cherie
Berry
Tom
Fetzer
Virginia
Foxx
Pat
McCrory
Patrick
McHenry
Sue
Myrick
Fred
Smith
Other/
Undecided
Public Policy Polling November 19–21, 2010 400 ± 4.9% 2% 3% 12% 11% 37% 3% 6% 4% 22%

Results[edit]

Republican primary results [26]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Pat McCrory 744,226 83.4%
Republican Paul Wright 46,986 5.3%
Republican Scott Jones 30,884 3.5%
Republican Jim Mahan 29,794 3.3%
Republican Jim Harney 26,242 2.9%
Republican Charles Kenneth Moss 13,696 1.5%
Totals 891,828 100%

General election[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Walter
Dalton (D)
Pat
McCrory (R)
Barbara
Howe (L)
Other Undecided
Public Policy Polling November 3–4, 2012 926 ± 3.2% 43% 50% 4% 3%
Public Policy Polling October 29–31, 2012 730 ± 3.6% 39% 50% 4% 7%
WRAL News/SurveyUSA October 26–29, 2012 682 ± 3.8% 36% 53% 11%
Elon University October 21–26, 2012 1,238 ± 2.8% 38% 52% 2% 8%
Rasmussen Reports October 25, 2012 500 ± 4.5% 35% 54% 1% 10%
Public Policy Polling October 23–25, 2012 880 ± 3.3% 37% 50% 5% 8%
Rasmussen Reports October 17, 2012 500 ± 4.5% 42% 53% 4%
Public Policy Polling October 12–14, 2012 1,084 ± 3% 37% 47% 5% 11%
Rasmussen Reports October 9, 2012 500 ± 4.5% 38% 52% 10%
Gravis Marketing October 6–8, 2012 1,325 ± 2.9% 33% 50% 17%
Rasmussen Reports October 2, 2012 500 ± 4.5% 38% 54% 1% 7%
Survey USA September 29–October 1, 2012 573 ± 4.2% 39% 51% 3% 7%
Public Policy Polling September 27–30, 2012 981 ± 3.1% 37% 47% 5% 10%
WSJ/NBC News/Marist September 23–25, 2012 1,035 ± 3.4% 39% 52% 8%
Civitas September 18–19, 2012 600 ± 4% 38% 49% 3% 10%
Rasmussen Reports September 13, 2012 500 ± 3.4% 38% 51% 1% 10%
Survey USA/Civitas September 4–6, 2012 500 ± 3.4% 39% 55% 4% 29%
Public Policy Polling August 31–September 2, 2012 1,012 ± 3.4% 39% 45% 5% 10%
Elon Univ./Charlotte Observer August 25–30, 2012 1,089 ± 3.4% 37% 52% 11%
Public Policy Polling August 2–5, 2012 813 ± 3.4% 38% 45% 7% 11%
Rasmussen Reports July 27, 2012 500 ± 4.5% 41% 46% 3% 10%
Civitas July 16–18, 2012 600 ± 4% 37% 47% 6% 4%
Public Policy Polling July 5–8, 2012 775 ± 3.5% 36% 43% 9% 12%
Survey USA June 29–July 1, 2012 558 ± 4.2% 44% 46% 7% 3%
Rasmussen Reports June 25, 2012 500 ± 4.5% 35% 49% 4% 12%
NBC News/Marist June 24–25, 2012 1,019 ± 3.1% 41% 43% 17%
Public Policy Polling June 7–10, 2012 810 ± 3.4% 40% 47% 13%
Survey USA May 18–21, 2012 524 ± 4.4% 39% 44% 7% 10%
Civitas May 19–20, 2012 600 ± 4% 38% 48% 12%
Rasmussen Reports May 14, 2012 500 ± 4.5% 41% 50% 1% 8%
Public Policy Polling May 10–13, 2012 666 ± 3.8% 40% 46% 13%
Rasmussen Reports April 10, 2012 500 ± 4.5% 36% 45% 5% 14%
Public Policy Polling March 8–11, 2012 804 ± 3.5% 35% 46% 19%
Civitas February 27–28, 2012 600 ± 4% 29% 49% 22%
Public Policy Polling January 27–29, 2012 554 ± 4.2% 35% 50% 15%
Public Policy Polling September 30–October 3, 2011 760 ± 3.6% 32% 46% 23%
Public Policy Polling March 17–20, 2011 584 ± 4.1% 27% 47% 26%

Debates[edit]

Dalton and McCrory met for their first televised debate at the studios of UNC-TV on Oct. 3, 2012. Two debates were sponsored by the North Carolina Association of Broadcasters Educational Foundation, with the third and final debate sponsored by WRAL-TV and the Rocky Mount Chamber of Commerce. Howe was not invited to participate in any of the scheduled debates. The Associated Press characterized Dalton as going "on the offensive" against McCrory in the first debate.[39] The final encounter between the two candidates, held Oct. 24 on the campus of North Carolina Wesleyan College, featured "more subdued disagreements over taxes, education, health care and mental health." [40]

Results[edit]

North Carolina gubernatorial election, 2012
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Pat McCrory 2,447,988 54.70% +7.82%
Democratic Walter H. Dalton 1,931,750 43.17% -7.10%
Libertarian Barbara Howe 95,154 2.13% -0.72%
Margin of victory 516,238 11.54% +8.14%
Turnout 4,474,892 67.30% -0.84%
Republican gain from Democratic Swing

Note: The ±% column reflects the change in total number of votes won by each party from the previous election. Neither the vote shares nor turnout figures account for write-ins. Turnout percentage is the portion of registered voters (6,649,188 as of 11/6/2012)[42] who voted.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "2012 General Election Results". Raleigh, North Carolina: North Carolina State Board of Elections. 
  2. ^ News & Observer: 90-year-old physician files in Democratic primary
  3. ^ Dalton makes it official: He will seek governor's office | newsobserver.com projects
  4. ^ State Board of Elections: candidate filing list
  5. ^ A Closer Look: Dunn making second run for Governor
  6. ^ "Former Rep. Bob Etheridge to run for governor". WTVD-TV. February 2, 2012. 
  7. ^ Bill Faison announces run for governor :: WRAL.com
  8. ^ Winston-Salem Journal
  9. ^ Christensen, Rob (February 28, 2012). "Dan Blue rules out governor's race". The News & Observer. Retrieved February 28, 2012. 
  10. ^ Bowles won't run for governor
  11. ^ a b Perdue will not seek re-election :: WRAL.com
  12. ^ Democratic state treasurer won't seek higher office in 2012 | newsobserver.com projects
  13. ^ [1][dead link]
  14. ^ News & Observer: Charlotte mayor Anthony Foxx won't run for governor
  15. ^ "VOTE 2012: Hagan not running for governor". WWAY NewsChannel 3. January 30, 2012. Retrieved January 30, 2012. 
  16. ^ Graff, Laura (January 30, 2012). "Winston-Salem Mayor Allen Joines won't run for governor". Winston-Salem Journal. Retrieved January 30, 2012. 
  17. ^ Burns, Matthew (February 10, 2012). "McIntyre withdraws name from gubernatorial run". WRAL-TV. Retrieved February 10, 2012. 
  18. ^ "Brad Miller won't run for governor". News and Observer. February 16, 2012. Retrieved February 16, 2012. 
  19. ^ Christensen, Rob (February 24, 2012). "Moore won't run for governor". The News & Observer. Retrieved February 24, 2012. 
  20. ^ Frank, John (January 26, 2012). "Gov. Bev Perdue will not run for re-election". Raleigh News & Observer. Retrieved January 26, 2012. 
  21. ^ Miller, Joshua (January 31, 2012). "North Carolina: Heath Shuler Decides Against Gubernatorial Bid". Roll Call. Retrieved January 31, 2012. 
  22. ^ News & Observer: Democratic gubernatorial candidates' hopes ride on three nights of debate
  23. ^ News & Observer: Little discord at NC Democratic gubernatorial debate
  24. ^ News & Observer: Democratic gubernatorial debate: Criticism grows sharper
  25. ^ News & Observer: Democratic candidates vow to veto voter ID bills
  26. ^ a b Election Map 2012: Live Voting Results - POLITICO.com
  27. ^ Barksdale, Andrew (February 23, 2012). "Jim Harney of Cumberland County is running for N.C. Governor". The Fayetteville Observer. Retrieved February 24, 2012. 
  28. ^ WRAL.com
  29. ^ News & Observer: Another Republican candidate for governor
  30. ^ "Pat McCrory '100 percent' in for NC gov race". WRAL-TV. Associated Press. December 19, 2011. Retrieved February 24, 2012. 
  31. ^ a b "Two more Republicans join GOP contest for governor". The Times-News. Associated Press. February 24, 2012. Retrieved February 24, 2012. 
  32. ^ WRAL/Associated Press: Other NC gov candidates still aim for top prize
  33. ^ Christensen, Rob (January 3, 2010). "Who has the edge in '10? The view from my murky research". The News & Observer. Retrieved December 4, 2010. 
  34. ^ Daily Herald: N.C. labor commissioner: Focus is safety ("Berry, who was first elected to the position she occupies in 2000...plans to seek re-election in 2012.")
  35. ^ http://www.m2mpolitics.com/news/marriage-1967-primary-question.html
  36. ^ North Carolina County Commissioner Jumps Into Race : Roll Call Politics
  37. ^ News & Observer: Agriculture commissioner announces re-election bid
  38. ^ WCNC.com
  39. ^ Associated Press/News & Observer
  40. ^ News & Observer
  41. ^ "Election Results". North Carolina State Board of Elections. Retrieved November 8, 2012. 
  42. ^ http://www.app.sboe.state.nc.us/webapps/voter_stats/results.aspx?date=11-06-2012

External links[edit]

Campaign sites