North Carolina judicial election, 1998

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The North Carolina judicial elections of 1998 were held on 3 November 1998, to elect judges to the North Carolina Supreme Court and North Carolina Court of Appeals.

Supreme Court[edit]

Webb seat[edit]

1998 North Carolina Supreme Court election – Webb seat[1]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican George L. Wainwright, Jr. 933,692 50.11
Democratic James A. Wynn, Jr. (incumbent)[2] 929,761 49.89
Turnout 1,863,453

Whichard seat[edit]

1998 North Carolina Supreme Court election – Whichard seat[1]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Mark Martin 1,127,779 58.72
Democratic Jim Martin 792,908 41.28
Turnout 1,920,687

Court of Appeals[edit]

Eagles seat[edit]

1998 North Carolina Court of Appeals election – Eagles seat[1]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Sidney S. Eagles, Jr. (incumbent) 968,582 52.75
Republican Wendell Schollander 867,471 47.25
Turnout 1,836,053

Greene seat[edit]

1998 North Carolina Court of Appeals election – Greene seat[1]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic K. Edward Greene (incumbent) 970,847 52.96
Republican Paul Stam 862,197 47.04
Turnout 1,833,044

Horton seat[edit]

1998 North Carolina Court of Appeals election – Horton seat[1]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Robert H. Edmunds, Jr. 949,110 51.59
Democratic Clarence E. Horton, Jr. (incumbent) 890,533 48.41
Turnout 1,839,643

Timmons-Goodson seat[edit]

1998 North Carolina Court of Appeals election – Timmons-Goodson seat[1]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Patricia Timmons-Goodson (incumbent) 948,652 51.63
Republican Douglas McCullough 888,669 48.37
Turnout 1,837,321

Arnold seat[edit]

1998 North Carolina Court of Appeals election – Arnold seat[1]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Robert C. Hunter 914,301 50.10
Republican Raymond A. Warren 910,482 49.90
Turnout 1,824,783

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g "1998 General Election". North Carolina State Board of Elections. Retrieved 7 January 2010. 
  2. ^ Although the seat was called the "Webb" seat for its previous occupant, John Webb, Wynn was appointed to replace Webb before the election, and was therefore the incumbent.